Member News – October 2021

Pnina Abir-Am (Brandeis University) was named the winner of a 2021 SIIA Excel Award in the Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives Features category (Silver) for her article “The Women Who Discovered RNA Splicing” published in the September-October 2020 issue of the American Scientist (Vol. 108, no. 6). An opinion piece by the author about the implications of the journal’s editors to not feature the article on the cover was the cover article in our previous issue (HSS Newsletter, April 2021).

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Scottie Buehler published “Aborted Dreams and Contested Labors: The Société Royale de Médecine’s 1786 Survey of Midwives” in the Bulletin for the History of Medicine 92, 2. (2021): 137-168. Additionally, he has accepted a position as Visiting Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine at Sam Houston State University.

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Luis Campos has been appointed Baker College Chair for the History of Science, Technology, and Innovation at Rice University, which he will begin in January 2022.

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Helmholtz and the Conservation of Energy: Contexts of Creation and Reception by Kenneth L. Caneva

Kenneth Caneva (University of North Carolina Greensboro, retired) published Helmholtz and the Conservation of Energy: Contexts of Creation and Reception (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2021).

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Karine Chemla (SPHERE (CNRS & Université de Paris)) was named the winner of the 2021 Hirst Prize and Lectureship, awarded jointly by the London Mathematical Society and the British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM).

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Rachel Mason Dentinger (University of Utah) was named the 2021-2022 Environmental Humanities Research Professor for the University of Utah’s Environmental Humanities Graduate Program. Additionally, after five years of working as an instructor in the Honors College and department of philosophy, she has begun a new position as an assistant professor in the Department of History this fall (2021).

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Robert Fleck (Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University) published “Fundamental Themes in Physics from the History of ArtPhysics in Perspective 23, no. 1 (March 2021): 25-48, and “Einsteinian Subtleties in Magritte’s Time TransfixedPhysics Today 74, no. 4 (April 2021): 10-11.

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André Goddu (Stonehill College) published “Celestial Spheres in Fifteenth-Century Cracow Astronomy and Natural Philosophy,” SCIREA, Vol. 5, Issue 4, August 2021, a revised and corrected version of the essay that appeared in What is New in the New Universities? ed. E. Jung (Warsaw, 2018), pp. 205-256.

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Edward Gosseline (Emeritus Professor, CSULB) is writing an essay on French historians, particularly on Michel Foucault and his connection to the Annales school as well as to Friedrich Nietzsche. This is a proposed chapter in a series of essays for a book on post-retirement research. Gosselin has been particularly interested in Foucault since he was an auditor in Foucault’s class at the Collège de France in 1976.

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Julia Heideklang (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), along with Hans-Joachim Pflüger and Helmut Kettenmann, published De fabrica systematis nervosi evertebratorum. Die kommentierte Dissertation von / the commented Thesis by Hermann Helmholtz (Darmstadt: WBG Academic, 2021).

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Gerald Holton (Harvard University) was granted the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences for his numerous seminal contributions to the history of 19th- and 20th-century science, in particular physics, in which he has shown special sensitivity to the cultural, philosophical, sociological, and gender contexts.

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Greta Jones (Ulster University) was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPSI) for services to the history of medicine in Ireland. Additionally, Jones published Doctors for Export: The History of Medical Emigration from Ireland c.1860-1960 (Brill, 2021).

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Henk Kubbinga (University of Groningen) published two papers on Nicolaus Mulerius, the first professor of what we would call Exact Sciences at the University of Groningen: “Nicolaus Mulerius (1564-1630): dissimulating Copernicanism in the revolting Dutch RepublicAlmagest 11, no. 2: 58-83 (2020); and “Nicolaus Mulerius as crypto-CopernicanPeriodiek no. 1: 5-9 (2020) (the magazine of the Physical-Mathematical Union of the Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Groningen). Kubbinga’s work on the history of molecular theory gave way to the paper “The fourth centenary of the molecular theory 1620-2020” in ACS-DHC’s Bulletin for the History of Chemistry 46 no. 1: 21-29 (2021). Late in 2020, Kubbinga also published the fourth volume of his series Making molecularism. Selected papers-Œuvres choisies (Groningen: Groningen University Press; ISBN 978-90-814428-9-3).

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A Life and Career in Chemistry: Autobiography from the 1960s to the 1990s by Pierre Laszlo

Pierre Laszlo (Ecole polytechnique and University of Liège) published A Life and Career in Chemistry: Autobiography from the 1960s to the 1990s (Springer, 2021).

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Healing with Poisons: Potent Medicines in Medieval China
by Yan Liu

Yan Liu (State University of New York, Buffalo) published Healing with Poisons: Potent Medicines in Medieval China (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2021).

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Robert (Jay) Malone, formerly HSS’s executive director, has become the director of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning, transforming scholarship, and creating diverse and inclusive communities. It develops programs, products, and services to help those working in academic and research libraries learn, innovate, and lead within the academic community. ACRL—with over 9,000 individual and institutional members—is the largest of the divisions of the American Library Association, and the headquarters are based in Chicago. Jay is excited about this new chapter and one of his first moves will be to join HSS’s Collections, Archives, Libraries, and Museums (CALM) Caucus.

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Ronald Mickens published “The Roles of SIR Mathematical Models in Epidemiology” History of Physics Newsletter XIV, no. 5 (Fall 2020): 2, 10-15.

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The Astronomer’s Chair: A Visual and Cultural History
by Omar Nasim

Omar Nasim (University of Regensburg, Germany) published The Astronomer’s Chair: A Visual and Cultural History (Cambridge, Mass: The MIT Press, 2021).

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Vivek Neelakantan (Independent Historian) was a featured speaker in the Third International Virtual Summer School entitled “Resilience and Control: Transmissible Disease and the Rise of Modern Society,” organized by Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia (August 11, 2021), directed at an international mix of undergraduate and graduate students, mostly from Southeast Asian nations. He lectured on the First Wave of COVID-19 in India and Indonesia from a comparative perspective, drawing from both history and sociology.

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Ronald Numbers (University of Wisconsin-Madison) is in the process of publishing “Creationism in Asia, Oceania, and Eastern Europe,” in a double volume of International Journal for the History of Scientific Ideas, v. 12: 2021, which was in production at the time of publication of this issue of the Newsletter.

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Traumatic Pasts in Asia: History, Psychiatry, and Trauma, 1930 to the Present by Hans Pols

Hans Pols (University of Sydney) was elected to become a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2020. Additionally, he published Traumatic Pasts in Asia: History, Psychiatry, and Trauma, 1930 to the Present (New York: Berghahn, 2021).

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Seth Rasmussen (South Dakota State University) was named a 2021 Fellow of American Chemical Society, in specific recognition of his work in the history of chemistry, as well as his traditional chemical research.

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Whitney Barlow Robles (Dartmouth College) published a digital exhibition titled “The Kitchen in the Cabinet: Histories of Food and Science.” The project was produced in collaboration with undergraduate students at Dartmouth College.

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Karin Rosemblatt (University of Maryland) is PI for a five-year NSF Research Coordination Grant “Placing Latin American and the Caribbean in the History of Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine.” Email karosemb@umd.edu if you are interested in learning more.

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A Philosophers Look at Human Beings by Michael Ruse

Michael Ruse (Florida State University, retired) published A Philosophers Look at Human Beings (Cambridge University Press, 2021).

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Emilie Savage-Smith (University of Oxford) assisted with the editing and translating of A Literary History of Medicine: The ʿUyūn al-anbāʾ fī ṭabaqāt al-aṭibbāʾ of Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah (Leiden: Brill, 2020).

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Sara Schechner (Harvard University) was awarded the Sawyer Dialing Prize from the North American Sundial Society “for her career in education and conservation of our dialing heritage, and in particular for her authorship of Time of Our Lives: Sundials of the Adler Planetarium.” The prize is considered the “Oscar” of the sundial world because the awardee receives a personalized sundial.

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Ariel Segal (Library of Congress) presented a paper and slides at Archival Kismet Conference in April 2021 on two versions of paleontological art by John Martin, comparing and contrasting it with his earlier art of Biblical catastrophic scenes. He also described two items of paleontological interest encountered while helping digitize material at the Library of Congress.

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Frank W. Stahnisch (The University of Calgary) has received the Jason A. Hannah Medal for an important publication in the History of Medicine (his recently published monograph: A New Field in Mind: A History of Interdisciplinarity in the Early Brain Sciences. Montreal, PQ, and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queens University Press, 2020) through the Royal Society of Canada–the Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada, Ottawa.

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More from the October 2021 Newsletter