October 2018 – Member News

Lindsay Alberts (Savannah College of Art and Design) is delighted to join Savannah College of Art and Design as Professor of Art History. She will teach introductory and early modern courses, and looks forward to discovering the charms of this new city.

…………

Warwick Anderson (University of Sydney and Harvard University (2018-19)) will publish the following:

Anderson, Warwick, and Roque, Ricardo, eds. “Imagined Laboratories: Comparative Racializations in Island Southeast Asia.” Special Issue of Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 49, no. 3 (October 2018).

Anderson, Warwick, Johnson, Miranda, and Brookes, Barbara, ed. Pacific Futures: Past and Present (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2018). Release set for 30 November 2018.

Anderson, Warwick, Roque, Ricardo, and Ventura Santos, Ricardo, ed. Lusotropicalism and its Discontents: The Making and Unmaking of Racial Exceptionalism (New York: Berghahn, 2019). Release set for February 2019.

…………

Rima D. Apple (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Professor Emerita presented the keynote lecture at the Postponement of Parenthood Conference, Villa Vigoni, Lake Como, 3-6 September 2018. The title of her paper was “Why delayed motherhood? Women’s decisions, 1910s-2010s.”

…………

Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (Florida Atlantic University) has been appointed as a member of the Executive Committee of the International Society for the Philosophy of Chemistry. She also presented an invited lecture titled “Robert Boyle and the Relational and Dispositional Nature of Chemical Properties” at the Seminar on the History and Philosophy of Chemistry (Laboratoire Sphère – Université de Paris Diderot), on 7 March 2018.

She recently published the following article:

Il neoplatonismo nell’ontologia chimica di Jan Baptista van Helmont.” In Platone nel pensiero moderno e contemporaneo, Volume 10, edited by Andrea Muni. 1-26. Milano: Limina Mentis, 2017.

She also served as guest editor of the following two journal volumes:

Foundations of Chemistry. Special issue for the 20th annual symposium of the International Society for the Philosophy of Chemistry (Part I), Vol. 19, No. 1.

Foundations of Chemistry. Special issue for the 20th annual symposium of the International Society for the Philosophy of Chemistry (Part II), Vol. 19, No. 3.

…………

Ana Barahona (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) recently published La Evolución Biológica en los Libros de Texto Mexicanos (Mexico City: UNAM/Centro Lombardo Toledano, 2017), with Erica Torrens.

Barahona has also been appointed a member of the International Advisory Board of the British Society for the History of Science. She started her 3-year term on 1 September 2017.

…………

Joe Bassi (University of Texas, El Paso) will be spending the fall term as a visiting scholar in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University.

…………

Harold Burstyn (retired) has moved to a CCRC in Madison, WI. He continues to spend summers in Woods Hole, MA, where he is a member of the Society (formerly the Corporation) of the Marine Biological Laboratory, now part of the University of Chicago.

…………

Stephen Case (Olivet Nazarene University) recently published Making Stars Physical: The Astronomy of Sir John Herschel (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018).

…………

Jonathan Coopersmith (Texas A&M University) will be a Visiting Research Fellow at King’s College, London this fall to research his “Creative Construction: The Importance of Fraud and Froth in Emerging Technologies.” He was also involved in a recent conference hosted by the American Institute of Physics: “To Boldly Preserve: Archiving the Next Half-Century of Space Flight.” Funded by NSF, the conference attracted nearly 100 historians, archivists, curators, and other people interested in actively promoting the collection and preservation of space history. The conference was organized by Angel Callahan (Naval Research Laboratory), Coopersmith, and Greg Good (AIP). For more information, read “Archiving the Final Frontier: Preserving Space History for the Future” on Perspectives on History, listen to The Museum of Flight’s “Preserving the Future History of Space,” or visit toboldpreserve.space.

…………

Surekha Davies (John Carter Brown Library, Brown University) was shortlisted for the Pickstone Prize, awarded biennially by the British Society for History of Science for the best scholarly book in the history of science. Davies will be an InterAmericas Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University (Sept 2018-March 2019). Davies will be a Senior Research Fellow at the Descartes Centre for the History and Philosophy of Science and the Humanities at Utrecht University (May-July 2019).

…………

Krishna Dronamraju (Foundation for Genetic Research) is set to release A Century of Geneticists: Mutation to Medicine (Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2018) in October. The book is a collection of biographies of the leading geneticists of the twentieth century, such as Hugo de Vries, William Bateson, Francis Galton, T.H. Morgan, H.J. Muller, J.B.S. Haldane, Ronald Fisher, Sewall Wright, Oswald Avery, Erwin Schrödinger, Barbara McClintock, Francis Crick, James Watson, George W. Beadle, Norman Borlaug, M.S. Swaminathan, Victor McKusick and others. The lives and contributions of these scientists are presented within the context of their times and social circumstances. Both hardback and paperback versions are being published in October 2018 by the CRC Press (Taylor and Francis Group) in the USA and Routledge in the U.K.

…………

Matthew Daniel Eddy (Durham University) has been promoted to a full professorship in the history of science.

…………

Yulia Frumer (Johns Hopkins) has recently published the following:

Frumer, Yulia. Making Time: Astronomical Time Measurement in Tokugawa Japan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018.

Frumer, Yulia. “Translating Words, Building Worlds: Meteorology in Japanese, Chinese, and Dutch.Isis 109, no. 2 (June 2018): 326-332.

Frumer, Yulia. “Japanese Reverse Compasses: Grounding Cognition in History and Society.Science in Context 31, no. 2. (June 2018): 155-187.

…………

Amanda Golbeck (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences) wants to bring the American Statistical Association (ASA) to your attention, because you don’t have to be a member to join!

The ASA has a brand new History of Statistics Interest Group (HoSIG).

The objectives of HoSIG are to:

  1. Bring together individuals and groups who have an active interest in the history of statistics.
  2. Promote and support research into the history of statistics at all levels.
  3. Further the use of the history of statistics in education.
  4. Encourage the historical perspective among statisticians and related professionals.
  5. Contribute to the program of the annual Joint Statistical Meetings and selected meetings of the ASA and other professional organizations.

Please let her know if you have any questions. Here is a link to the instructions about how to join. Amanda L. Golbeck, Chair-Elect of HoSIG, agolbeck@uams.edu.

…………

Kristine Harper (Florida State University) has been promoted to Professor of History at Florida State University.

…………

Hans Haubold (United Nations) and Barbara Haubold (International Atomic Energy Agency) initiated a project to Search for Memorabilia of Dorothy Michelson-Livingston (1906-1994):

Dorothy is the author of the only existing biography of her father Albert A. Michelson, the first American Nobel Prize winner in physics (1907). While writing this biography over a period of more than ten years she was in contact with famous scientists and engineers to revisit the Michelson experiments that were the subject of two conferences, one held in 1981 (Astronomische Nachrichten 303 (1982)1-96, Potsdam, Germany) and one held in 1987 (American Institute of Physics 169 and 179, Cleveland, USA).

The project wishes to recover documentary evidence on Dorothy’s restless efforts to reconstruct Michelson’s scientific work and his intellectual environment:
Advice and support from the international community are welcome.

B. Haubold, H.J. Haubold, and L. Pyenson, “Michelson’s first ether-drift experiment in Berlin and Potsdam.” The Michelson Era in American Science, 1870-1930, Eds. S. Goldberg and R.H. Stuewer, AIP Conference Proceedings Vol. 179 (1988) 42-54, American Institute of Physics, New York, 1988.

…………

Toby Huff (Harvard University) was recently interviewed by Mohammed Alrushoodi. The published interview can be found at “The Sociology of Early Modern Science.

…………

Alexandra Hui (Mississippi State University) was elected as a Councilor for the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association. Her service will begin on 1 January 2019.

…………

Margaret Jacob’s (UCLA) new book The Secular Enlightenment (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018) will appear soon.

…………

Henk Kubbinga (University of Groningen) is glad to report on the latest developments concerning Planck’s constant, h. In a paper titled “A Tribute to Max Planck,” Europhysics News 49, no. 4 (July-August 2018): 27-30, he succeeded in further refining Planck’s own 1899 calculations ab initio, that is, from first principles. The context of those calculations sheds an entirely new light upon the so-called “quantum revolution.” In fact, there was, from a molecular point of view, far more continuity than generally acknowledged. In this Newsletter of our most-distinguished History of Science Society, it is a pleasure to stress that the final elucidation of Planck’s mathematics, in 2015, was an obvious “tale of two Continents,” as Charles Dickens would have called it playfully. It all started on the Old Continent, in Paris, with a PhD (1983) and habilitation (1996) on the history of the (atomic and) molecular theory (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), continued with papers read at annual meetings of the HSS (1996, Atlanta, GA: “Max Planck: Molecularism and Quantum Theory;” 1999, Pittsburgh, PA: “Laplace and the Rise of Molecularism”), and subsequently as a guest of the German Physical Society at the Quantum Centenary Congress (2000, Berlin: “’Planck’s Quanta as Molecules of Energy”) and, later, of the American Institute of Physics (2006, College Park, MD; study of US-Englished source materials), to conclude now with the publication of Planck’s calculation of h under the wings of the European Physical Society.

…………

Philipp Lehmann (UC Riverside) recently published:
Camprubí, Lino, and Philipp Lehmann, eds. “Experiencing the Global Environment.” Special issue, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A, 70 (2018).

…………

For her next book project, Slouch: The Forgotten History of America’s Poor Posture Epidemic, Beth Linker (University of Pennsylvania) has won grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Library of Medicine for the 2018-2019 year.

…………

Pamela O. Long (independent scholar) has recently published Engineering the Eternal City: Infrastructure, Topography, and the Culture of Knowledge in Late Sixteenth-Century Rome (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

…………

Paige Madison (Arizona State University) has received a Fulbright Study/Research Award to spend a year at Universitas Indonesia and Indonesia’s National Archaeological Research Center conducting language study and pursuing the project “Homo floresiensis and the History of Anthropology in Indonesia.”

…………

Adrienne Mayor (Stanford University) was recently awarded the Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford for 2018-19.

…………

Richard Oosterhoff (University of Edinburgh) recently moved from a research post at CRASSH, University of Cambridge, to a permanent post as Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Edinburgh.

Oosterhoff will publish Making Mathematical Culture: University and Print in the Circle of Lefèvre d’Étaples (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018) and Logodaedalus: Word Histories of Ingenuity in Early Modern Europe (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018), both set for release in October. Logodaedalus is co-authored with Alexander Marr, Raphaële Garrod, and José Ramón Marcaida.

…………

Don Opitz (DePaul University) was appointed Interim Dean of the School for New Learning, DePaul University, for the 2018-19 academic year. Previously he served as the School’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Enrollment Management. He continues to hold Associate Professor status on DePaul’s faculty.

He also published “Emergence of LGBTQ Studies” in Living Out Loud: An Introduction to LGBTQ History, Society, and Culture, edited by Michael J. Murphy and Brytton Bjorngaard, 195-96. New York: Routledge, 2019.

…………

Hans Pols (University of Sydney) has recently published a monograph, Nurturing Indonesia: Medicine and Decolonisation in the Dutch East Indies (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).

…………

Pedro Raposo (Adler Planetarium) is now Curator and Director of Collections at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago. The new role expands on his previous position as Adler’s Curator and entails higher responsibilities in steering the Planetarium’s history and collections department (aka the Webster Institute), working closely with the Adler’s VP of Astronomy and Collections. Pedro and his team will continue to pursue varied initiatives and projects in order to make the Adler’s world-class collections of scientific instruments, rare books, and archival materials ever more accessible to the research community, while exploring innovative and engaging ways of using this remarkable resource in Adler exhibitions and programs.

…………

Joy Lisi Rankin recently published A People’s History of Computing in the United States (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2018). For more information, visit www.joyrankin.com.

…………

Anna Reser would like to announce that Lady Science is celebrating its fourth birthday in October 2018! Lady Science is an independent magazine and podcast focused on women and gender in the history and popular culture of science. Founded in 2014 as a small newsletter, Lady Science now publishes researched historical essays each month, essays on higher education, pop culture, current events, and special series on topics such as fascism and science, gender and pain in the medical establishment, Star Trek, and sports and science.

The Lady Science Podcast archive includes interviews with scholars and writers like Dr. Marie Hicks, Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble, and Dr. Susan Stryker. The podcast has covered topics like historical myths about the female body, queer histories of science, gender and technology, and the history of scientific racism.
The editors and staff would like to thank our readers for their support and enthusiasm over the last four years, and invite HSS members who are not familiar with the magazine to browse our archive (ladyscience.com/archive), follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@ladyxscience), and subscribe to our newsletter (tinyletter.com/ladyscience) and podcast (ladyscience.com/podcast). Lady Science is fully reader supported (patreon.com/ladyscience) and will always be completely free to access.

…………

Andrew S. Reynolds (Cape Breton University) has recently published The Third Lens: Metaphor and the Creation of Modern Cell Biology (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

…………

John L. Rudolph (University of Wisconsin-Madison) will publish How We Teach Science: What’s Changed and Why It Matters (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2019) in the spring. The book recounts the way in which science and its methods have been taught in American schools from the middle of the eighteenth century to the present with an eye to understanding the consequences of that teaching for the relationship between science and the public.

Rudolph has also recently begun his second term as chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at Wisconsin.

…………

Neeraja Sankaran (Ashoka University) is now a Visiting Associate Professor, as she was invited to reprise her former role of Associate Professor to teach the foundation undergraduate course in scientific literacy (Principles of Science) at Ashoka University, India. She was also selected as a 2018-2019 Research Fellow at the Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine, to use the collections at: American Philosophical Society, Columbia University, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Rockefeller Archive Center, and Science History Institute.

Sankaran has recently published:

Sankaran, Neeraja. “On the Historical Significance of Beijerinck and His Contagium Vivum Fluidum for Modern Virology.History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40, no. 3 (September 2018): 41 (25 pages)

Helvoort, Ton van, and Neeraja Sankaran. “How Seeing Became Knowing: The Role of the Electron Microscope in Shaping the Modern Definition of Viruses.Journal of the History of Biology, (online 20 June 2018), 1-36.

Sankaran, Neeraja. Book Review of Immunity: the Evolution of an Idea, by Alfred I. Tauber. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40, no. 2 (June 2018): 32 (3 pages)

Sankaran, Neeraja. Book Review of From Madman to Crime Fighter: The Scientist in Western Culture, by Roslynn D. Haynes. The British Society for Literature and Science, July 2018 (Online only)

…………

Sigrid Schmalzer (University of Massachusetts Amherst) has been working on a number of projects related to activism and the history of science. In January, UMass Press published a volume she co-edited with Dan Chard and Alyssa Botelho titled Science for the People: Documents from America’s Movement of Radical Scientists. Meanwhile, she has been active in the reconstitution of Science for the People itself (in its former incarnation, it lasted roughly from 1969 to 1989). They held their first national convention in February and released the first issue of the revitalized magazine in July. Inspired by these developments, Schmalzer is launching a new book series with UMass Press called Activist Studies of Science and Technology. She hopes HSS members will consider the series for their activism-related book projects.

…………

David Schwartz was a guest speaker at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s 75th Anniversary Event, “Past, Present, and Future,” on August 6 at the Lab. He spoke about the nuclear legacy of Enrico Fermi, the history of the nuclear arms race and nuclear anxiety, and the role of scientists in the development, and control, of nuclear weapons.

…………

Roger H. Stuewer (University of Minnesota) recently published The Age of Innocence: Nuclear Physics between the First and Second World Wars (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2018).

…………

Alison Wylie (University of British Columbia), who is a Professor of Philosophy and Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of the Social and Historical Sciences, will give the Forum for the History of Human Science distinguished lecture at the 2018 HSS conference. Her primary interest is in understanding how we know what (we think) we know under non-ideal circumstances, and in addressing issues of accountability that arise in research practice. She publishes on evidential reasoning, ideals of objectivity, feminist standpoint theory and on normative issues raised by an ethic of stewardship and collaborative practice in archaeology.