October 2016 Member News

Gar Allen, Professor of Biology Emeritus at Washington University in St. Louis, retired in
2014 but has been busy with several projects. He published a number of articles on aspects of
early twentieth-century genetics, evolution and embryology, including:

  • “The History of Evolutionary Thought,” in The Princeton Guide to Evolution, Jonathan B.
    Losos, ed. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014): pp. 10-27
  • “Origins of the Classical Gene Concept, 1900-1950: Genetics, Mechanistic Philosophy and the Capitalization of Agriculture.” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (No 1, Winter, 2014): 8-39
  • “How Many Times Can You Be Wrong and Still Be Right? T.H. Morgan, Evolution, Chromosomes and the Origins of Modern Genetics.” Science & Education 24 (No. 1, 2015): 77-99
  • “Eugenics as an International Movement.” In International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences 2nd ed: Vol 8 (2015): 224-232
  • “Viktor Hamburger, 1900-2001,” Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (2015): 39 pp.

In addition, he will be speaking in a lecture series at the University of Kentucky in October, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Hunt Morgan, which also happens to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the publication of Mendel’s paper, and the 50th anniversary of Gar’s completion of his dissertation on Morgan. Between all this, he has also managed to take advantage of retirement to do some bucket-list travels, including to Alaska this past September.

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Joe Bassi’s (Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide) new book A Scientific Peak: How Boulder became a World Center for Space and Atmospheric Science was selected for an Atmospheric Sciences Librarians International (ASLI) Choice Award as one of the best books in atmospheric sciences in 2015. The book received an “honorable mention” in the history category.

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Darryl E. Brock has joined the faculty at the CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) as Assistant Professor of Latino Studies. At BMCC he will expand his research program of exploring how Puerto Ricans mediated U.S. colonial science into broader Latin America.

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Luis Campos (University of New Mexico) has been selected as the next Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology. The fourth scholar to hold this title, he will be in residence for a year at the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., where he will be researching the intersections between the histories of synthetic biology and astrobiology.

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Lawrence B. Coleman (UC Davis) has built up a collection of physics texts—the vast majority published between 1880 and 1920. He enjoyed seeing how these texts evolved from that earlier era to the current time—texts that he used in his education and then later referred to as a Professor at the University of California, Davis for the past 40 years. Some of these texts were written for college use, others for high school and some are aimed at the general public. Most have wonderful illustrations. All of them are in good to very good condition with some of them authored by well-known American and British scientists—Millikan, Tyndall, Thompson & Bragg.

He wants these books to go to someone who will appreciate them and use them in their own research on the history of physics and physics education. If you are interested, he will send you a PDF listing of the collection. Please contact him at LBColeman@ucdavis.edu.

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The Rise and Fall of the Fax Machine (Johns Hopkins University Press) written by Jonathan Coopersmith (Texas A&M University) is the co-recipient of the 2016 Business History Conference Hagley Prize for best book in business history.

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Frederick “Fritz” Davis (Purdue University) has been appointed to the R. Mark Lubbers Chair
in the History of Science in the Department of History at Purdue University. He will spend the
academic year 2016-17 at the Chinese University of Hong Kong on a Fulbright.

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Ron Doel, Kris Harper and Matthias Heymann edited Exploring Greenland: Cold War Science and Technology on Ice (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). The book addresses U.S. fascination with the Arctic—and determination to learn as much about its physical environment—as military planners anticipated that the region was where a war with the Soviet Union would be fought.

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U.S. immunologist Charles Janeway (1943-2003) was hailed in a Lancet obituary as the “father of innate immunity,” which is the phagocytedependent first line of defense against microbial infection. Recently Elie Metchnikoff (1845-1916) was hailed similarly (Cell 166: 1665-68). Now Donald Forsdyke (Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada) has ascribed paternity to a London physician, Almroth Wright (1861-1947), upon whom was based a character in Shaw’s “The Doctors Dilemma” (see “Almroth Wright, opsonins, innate immunity and the lectin pathway of complement activation: A historical perspective,” Microbes & Infection 18: 450-459).

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Tina Gianquitto (Colorado School of Mines) has been granted a Fulbright Lectureship in American Studies to teach U.S. environmental literature at the University of Naples I’Orientale—Dipartimento di Studi letterari, linguistici e comparati for the Spring of 2017.

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Owen Gingerich’s (Harvard University) new book Copernicus: A Very Short Introduction was recently published in August 2016 by Oxford University Press.

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Gabrielle Graham (Florida State University) has been promoted from Museum Educator to Visitor Services Supervisor at the Museum of Florida History. As a representative for the Museum of Florida History, she also actively serves as board member at-large for the Community Classroom Consortium, a coalition of cultural, scientific, natural history, and civic organizations in north Florida and south Georgia, providing educational experiences and resources for students, teachers, the general public, and its members.

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The twenty-fifth anniversary of Gary Hatfield’s (University of Pennsylvania) The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception from Kant to Helmholtz (MIT Press) was celebrated at the 11th biennial meeting of HOPOS, the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science, in Minneapolis (23-25 June 2016), with a Symposium: “The Natural and the Normative at 25: Psychology, Perception, and Measurement in Kant and Helmholtz.” The session was chaired by Scott Edgar (St. Mary’s University) and included talks by: Corey Dyck (Western Ontario), “Empirical and Transcendental Psychology”; Francesca Biagioli (Universität Konstanz), “The Natural and the Normative Reconciled: Helmholtz’s Theory of Measurement”; and Lydia Patton (Virginia Tech), “Helmholtz on Sensory Complexity.” Hatfield responded with his paper “The Natural and the Normative and the Facts in Perception: Two Works Revisited.”

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Frank James (The Royal Institution) is delighted to announce that Michael Faraday’s laboratory
notebooks, RI MS F/2/A-J, have been enrolled on the UNESCO Memory of the World register.

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This summer, Kathryn Maxson Jones (Princeton University) received the Mary and Randall Hack ‘69 Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute, which supports innovative graduate research on water and water-related topics. For the official news story which features a short summary of the specific research to be conducted over the coming year supported by her award funds, please visit http://environment.princeton.edu/news/seven-princeton-studentsreceive-hack-graduate-awards.

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Melanie Kiechle’s (Virginia Tech) article, “Navigating by Nose: Fresh Air, Stench Nuisance, and the Urban Environment, 1840-1880” was recently published in the Journal of Urban History (42, no. 4 (2016): 753-771).

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Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Europe. US Technological Collaboration and Nonproliferation (MIT Press, 2016) by John Krige (Georgia Institute of Technology) is now available for purchase.

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Wiley Blackwell has published A Companion to the History of Science, edited by Bernard Lightman (York University) (Wiley Blackwell, 2016). This edited volume, an introduction to the history of science, contains 40 original essays written by experts in the field. It is structured around four analytical categories: roles, places and spaces, communication, and the tools of science.

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As of 1 September 2016, Brian Ogilvie (University of Massachusetts Amherst) has been promoted to the rank of (full) Professor and started an appointment as Chair of the History Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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The first BJHS Themes, a new, fully open access, peer-reviewed journal from the British Society for the History of Science, was published this month. The issue is titled “Science of Giants: China and India in the Twentieth Century.” In this article, one of the volume’s editors, Jahnavi Phalkey (King’s College London), gives her observations on the opportunities and challenges on writing about China and India.

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Anna Marie Roos, Reader at the University of Lincoln (UK), will be a visiting fellow at All Souls College, University of Oxford in 2017, and was a John Rylands Fellow at the University of Manchester in Summer 2016. Roos was also elected as a member of Council for the British Society for the History of Science in July 2016.

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Gildo Magallhães Santos (University of São Paulo, Brazil) has recently published two books in Brazil:

  • Ciência e conflito. Ensaios sobre História e Epistemologia de ciências e técnicas (Bookexpress, 2015)
  • Um bit auriverde. Caminhos da tecnologia e do projeto desenvolvimentista na formulação duma política nacional de informática para o Brasil (1971-1992) (Intermeios, 2016)

He has also been promoted to Full Professor at the History Department, University of São Paulo, Brazil effective August 2016.

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Sigrid Schmalzer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) recently published Red Revolution,
Green Revolution: Scientific Farming in Socialist China (University of Chicago Press, 2016).

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Angela D. Shaffer graduated with honors from American Public University System on 15 August 2016, with a Master of Arts in the Humanities. She also joined Golden Key International Honour Society this month. Her graduate research prompted the proposal, “Purple Peculiarities: The Evolving Quest for Meaning, Carroll’s Alice as Evidence of Blended Species,” which was accepted for the “Humanities, Literature, Cultures, and Arts Global Conference” scheduled for poster presentation on 18 October 2016 in Washington, D.C.

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The Making and Knowing Project, directed by Pamela H. Smith (Columbia University), has published two collectively researched and written articles in spring 2016:

  • Donna Bilak, Jenny Boulboullé, Joel Klein, and Pamela H. Smith, “The Making and Knowing
    Project – Reflections, Methods, and New Directions,” New Directions in Making and
    Knowing, a special issue, guest edited by Pamela H. Smith, of West 86th: A Journal of Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture, 23.1 (2016): 35-55.
  • Pamela H. Smith and the Making and Knowing Project, “Historians in the Laboratory: Reconstruction of Renaissance Art and Technology in the Making and Knowing Project,” Art History, special issue on Art and Technology, 39.2 (2016): 210-233.

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James Strick was promoted to full Professor of Science, Technology and Society at Franklin and Marshall College. In addition, he received the College’s Bradley R. Dewey Award for 2016-17 which celebrates faculty research of high caliber. The award notice cited Strick’s entire body of work but emphasized his recent book with Harvard University Press, titled Wilhelm Reich, Biologist.

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Elly Truitt (Bryn Mawr College) will be a visiting fellow at the MPIWG in Berlin for two months in the spring of 2017, working on a project about Roger Bacon and speculative technology. She was also awarded a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to learn Arabic and study Arabic scientific manuscripts.

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Hasan Hasan Umut is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Islamic Studies at McGill and is working on the history of science in Islamic societies with a particular interest in astronomy. He was awarded the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation & McGill Fellowship in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, which has been initiated by these two institutions this year. Under this fellowship, he conducts research in the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa.

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Conevery Bolton Valencius has accepted a new appointment as Professor in the History Department at Boston College. This year, she is Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, where she is working on the history of induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing.

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Mark A. Waddell (Lyman Briggs College and Department of History) has recently been
awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor at Michigan State University. He will
also be an Allington Fellow in the fall at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia.

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Congratulations to the New Doctors

During a history conference, I was sharing a room with a recent post doc, and he confided in me his difficulty in renewing his membership in HSS given the sizable difference between what students pay and the regular member rate. This to me seemed an opportunity both to celebrate a significant achievement and to encourage scholars to maintain (or begin) their membership in the HSS. The Society thus created a free e-membership for those who received their PhD in the prior year and who are no longer eligible for student memberships. You will receive all of the regular benefits, including discounted meeting registration, and if you are already a member, your membership (electronic only) will be extended by one year at no cost.

– Jay Malone, HSS Executive Director

JSTOR for HSS Members

In its strategic plan, HSS identified professional development as one of our six goals. Specifically,
the Society is focusing on supporting the “professional development of emerging history of science scholars in and outside the academy.” One of the ways in which the HSS can help our members advance their research and teaching is to facilitate access to the literature, and we are pleased to work with JSTOR to offer a 50% savings on a one year JPASS subscription for members. JPASS, available as monthly or yearly plans, allows you to read whatever journal article you like and enjoy up to 120
PDF downloads a year from the JSTOR archive, an archive with over 7 million articles from 2 thousand journals (including Isis and Osiris), representing some 50 academic disciplines.

In addition to past issues of Isis and Osiris, members may find the following journals of
particular interest:

  • The British Journal for the History of Science
  • Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied
    Sciences
  • Science Progress
  • Science, Technology, & Human Values

JSTOR adds new titles to JPASS every month so you’ll have a growing collection of the world’s leading scholarly journals only a click away. HSS members save 50% on a yearly JPASS here: http://jpass.jstor.org/?soc=HSS&mc=6kiy5hIv99

HSS Prize Nominations

Gentle Members, please take a few moments to nominate a book in the history of science (broadly but not infinitely conceived) that demonstrates an exemplary achievement, whether it be a work aimed primarily at scholars in the field (Pfizer), the general public (Davis), the role of women in science (Rossiter), or an examination of natural history (Levinson). Academic publishers nominate books en masse, including works that strain the imagination when it comes to science, and it is you, our members, who can offer the best insights regarding a work: what makes it notable and why the Society should consider it as path breaking, or important, or just plain interesting. And please remember that works by card-carrying historians of technology, historians of medicine, historians of the environment, and many other fields have won major HSS prizes. Just type a few sentences stating what sets this book apart. Informed suggestions will elevate our field and that is one of the more important goals of the HSS.