July 2018 – Member News

Jinna Maxwell Anderson has been involved with a study of applied art as expanding the definition of art to include the mechanisms of invention, and cross-disciplinarity/technology transfer.

…………

Rima Apple (University of Wisconsin) has received the Genevieve Miller Lifetime Achievement Award, offered by the American Association for the History of Medicine. Established in 1988, the award is given annually to a member of the AAHM who has retired from regular institutional affiliation or practice, with a distinguished record of support for the history of medicine over many years, and who has made continuing scholarly contributions of a distinguished nature.

…………

Joseph Baxley (University of Notre Dame) is the first recipient of the University of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute Gabriel Fellowship. The fellowship provides an extra fully-funded year of training in languages or other skills, before beginning dissertation work.

…………

At the meeting of the Justus Liebig-Gesellschaft in Giessen on 25 May 2018, at which Professor Emeritus William H. Brock (University of Leicester) gave a lecture titled “In Liebig’s Shadow: Heinrich Will (1812-90),” he was elected to Honorary Membership of the Society in recognition of his lifetime’s contribution to the history of chemistry and for his book Justus von Liebig: Eine Biographie des grossen Wissenschaftlers und Europaers. Dr. Brock first joined the Society in 1986.

…………

Harold Burstyn recently retired from the practice of law and moved to Madison, Wisconsin. Thus he is no longer an adjunct professor at Syracuse University. Now that he is free from other obligations, he expects to do more with the history of marine science. His email address remains burstynh@iname.com.

…………

Angela Creager (Princeton University) was recently awarded the 2018 Patrick Suppes Prize in the History of Science. She received the prize from the American Philosophical Society on 27 April 2018, for her book Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013).

…………

Jane Davidson (University of Nevada Reno) and Michael J. Everhart (Fort Hays State University) recently published “Scattered and Shattered: A Brief History of the Early Methods of Digging, Preserving and Transporting Kansas Fossils” in the Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 120, no. 3-4 (September 2017): 247-258.

…………

Edward (Ted) Davis (Messiah College), Professor of the History of Science, was appointed to the advisory board for a forthcoming exhibit on science and religion at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.

…………

William Deringer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) recently published Calculated Values: Finance, Politics, and the Quantitative Age (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2018).

…………

Steven Dick (former NASA Chief Historian) recently published Astrobiology, Discovery, and Societal Impact (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).

…………

Donald Forsdyke (Queen’s University) has extensively updated a biography of Gregor Mendel (Encyclopedia of Life Sciences, April 2018). Mendel-style plant breeding experiments were carried out by European botanists in the 1890s without knowledge of Mendel’s work. Similar animal studies had been carried out earlier by Darwin’s research associate, George Romanes (1848-1894), who knew of Mendel’s work. Mendel’s major advocate, William Bateson, recognized that the meiotic chromosomal studies of Michael F. Guyer—first reported as a brief note in Science (1900)—led to conclusions matching Mendel’s. Read more details here.

…………

Yulia Frumer (Johns Hopkins University) recently published Making Time: Astronomical Time Measurement in Tokugawa Japan (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2018). Dr. Frumer also recently published “Translating Words, Building Worlds: Meteorology in Japanese, Chinese, and Dutch” in Isis 109, no. 2 (June 2018): 326-332 and “Japanese Reverse Compasses: Grounding Cognition in History and Society,” in Science in Context 31, no. 2 (June 2018): 155-187.

…………

Joseph Gal (University of Colorado School of Medicine) recently published “Pasteur and the Art of Chirality” in Nature Chemistry 9, (2017): 604-605.

Dr. Gal is also co-organizer of a symposium, “Louis Pasteur’s Discovery of Molecular Chirality: Review and Analysis on the 170th Anniversary,” at the 256th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, 19-23 August 2018. He is co-author of a lecture to be presented during the symposium: “Path to Pasteur’s Paratartrate Discovery: New Insights Drawn from His Wayward First Two Laboratory Notebooks,” with Gregory Girolami.

…………

Scott Gilbert has retired and rewired from Swarthmore College. He now lives in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Gilbert recently published the following:

Gilbert, Scott F. and Clara Pinto-Correia. Fear, Wonder, and Science in the New Age of Reproductive Biotechnology. New York: Columbia University Press, 2017.

Roughgarden, J., S. F. Gilbert, E. Rosenberg, I. Zilber-Rosenberg, and E. A. Lloyd. “Holobionts as Units of Selection and a Model of Their Population Dynamics and Evolution.” Biological Theory 13, no. 1 (March 2018): 44-65.

Gilbert, Scott F. “Developmental Biology: The Stem Cell of Biological Disciplines.” PLOS Biology 15, 12 (December 2017): e2003691.

Gilbert, Scott F. “Holobiont by Birth: Multilineage Individuals as the Concretion of Cooperative Processes.” Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet, edited by Anna L. Tsing, Heather A. Swanson, Elaine Gan, and Nils Bubandt. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017 (73-89).

Gilbert, Scott F. “Achilles and the Tortoise: Some Caveats to Mathematical Modeling in Biology.” Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology (January 2018).

Gilbert, Scott F. “Biological Individuality: A Relational Reading.” Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical and Historical Perspectives, edited by Lynn K. Nyhart and Scott Lidgard. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017 (297-317).

Gilbert, Scott F. “Perspective: Rethinking Parts and Wholes.” Landscapes of Collectivity in the Life Sciences, edited by Snait Gissis, Ehud Lamm, and Ayelet Shavit. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017 (123-132).

Gilbert, Scott F., Eugene Rosenberg, and Ilana Zilber-Rosenberg. “The Holobiont with its Hologenome is a Level of Selection in Evolution.” Landscapes of Collectivity in the Life Sciences, edited by Snait Gissis, Ehud Lamm, and Ayelet Shavit. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017 (305-324).

…………

Benjamin Gross (Linda Hall Library) has recently published his first book, The TVs of Tomorrow: How RCA’s Flat Screen Dreams Led to the First LCDs (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

…………

Anita Guerrini (Oregon State University) has recently been awarded the Camargo Foundation Fellowship, an 11-week residential fellowship for winter-spring 2019 at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She will be working on a book project tentatively titled When We Were Giants: Fossils, Mythology, and Nationalism in Early Modern France.

…………

Three HSS members are participants in a day-long symposium, “Louis Pasteur’s Discovery of Molecular Chirality: Review and Analysis on the 170th Anniversary,” at the 256th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, 19-23 August 2018: Joseph Gal (as noted above), Carmen Giunta (Le Moyne College, “Biological Aspects of Molecular Chirality: Some 19th-Century Highlights”), and Bert Hansen (Baruch College of CUNY, “Pasteur and the Fine Arts”).

…………

Hans J. Haubold (United Nations) recently edited a volume of Axioms titled “Special Functions: Fractional Calculus and the Pathway for Entropy” (Basel: MDPI, 2018), containing invited papers that address the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy versus Tsallis entropy. The papers provide a contribution to resolve the argument of Einstein concerning “Neither Herr Boltzmann nor Herr Planck has given a definition of W” (A. Pais, Subtle is the Lord: The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982). The volume was inspired by recent results of the Super-Kamiokande experiment for solar neutrino physics and their diffusion entropy analysis.

…………

Daniel Lewis (Huntington Library) has recently published Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction and Evolution in Hawai’i (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2018).

…………

Francesco Luzzini (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Department I) has recently published Theory, Practice, and Nature In-between: Antonio Vallisneri’s Primi Itineris Specimen (Berlin, Edition Open Access/Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Sources 9, 2018).

The book is a critical edition of Antonio Vallisneri’s Primi itineris per Montes Specimen Physico-Medicum (1705), an unpublished draft manuscript containing an exceptionally wide array of geological, medical, geographical, technical, ethnographic, historical, and archaeological data. Dr. Luzzini worked on this volume during his Edition Open Sources Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Oklahoma Libraries and at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. The book, which is the result of a pioneering attempt to combine digital humanities with the edition of an early modern source text, is now freely accessible on the EOS website.

…………

Adrienne Mayor (Stanford University) has been selected to be a Berggruen Fellow 2018-19 at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS), Stanford. Mayor’s book The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014) has been translated into Spanish, Italian, and French, and the film/TV option was renewed by MWM Studios. “Amazons,” the first episode of the Smithsonian Channel documentary-dramatization, Epic Warrior Women, was based on her book; Mayor was an interviewee and consultant for the script and costumes.

Mayor’s next book, Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology, is forthcoming with Princeton in fall 2018.

…………

Michael McVaugh (University of North Carolina) has discovered what is apparently the earliest extended series of sunspot observations made in the United States, in the manuscript journals of Jonathan Fisher (Harvard 1792), the Congregational minister of Blue Hill, Maine. Fisher had connected these sunspots with the extraordinarily cold weather of 1816 (“the year without a summer”) and recorded their appearance intermittently from July 1816 to September 1817. His drawings are reproduced by W. F. Denig and M. R. McVaugh in “Early American Sunspot Drawings from the ‘Year without a Summer’” in Space Weather 15, no. 7 (July 2017): 857-60.

…………

Ronald Mickens (Clark Atlanta University) was recently awarded the 2018 Blackwell-Tapia Prize. The prize citation reads in part: “Mickens’ mathematical reach extends across multiple disciplines and has a significant global impact…. He has been unearthing, celebrating, and publicizing the achievements of Black scientists for more than four decades … (and) his book, Edward Bouchet: The First African American Doctorate, was published in 2002 and is an important contribution to the history of the participation of African Americans in STEM fields.”

Mickens and two collaborators presented two papers at the 2018 Georgia Academy of Science Annual Meeting:

  1. Beverly, Imani and R. E. Mickens. “The Reasons (Sometimes) for a Change of Mind,” Georgia Journal of Science 76, no. 1 (2018): article 64.
  2. Mickens, R. E. and Charmayne Patterson. “Unknown Not Hidden Figures in Science: The Role of Invisible Colleges,” Georgia Journal of Science 76, no. 1 (2018): article 65.

…………

“The Land Beneath Our Feet,” a film co-directed by Gregg Mitman (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Sarita Siegel, has just been released on iTunes. The film weaves together rare archival footage from a 1926 Harvard expedition to Liberia with the journey of a young Liberian man, uprooted by war, seeking to understand how the past has shaped land conflicts in his country today. Released in 2016, “The Land Beneath Our Feet” has screened on six continents and won the Best Feature, Documentary or Animated Film Award, International Competition, at the 2017 Festival de Cine Verde de Barichara in Colombia, the Best African Film Award at the 2017 San Francisco Black Film Festival, and Best Documentary Director Award at the 2017 Harlem International Film Festival, among other awards.

…………

Tiffany Nichols (Harvard University) was elected into the role of Chair-Elect of the Forum on Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA) of the American Physical Society for 2018. In 2019, Ms. Nichols will serve as the Chair of FGSA.

…………

Maria Clara Nucci (University of Perugia) has funded a prize, in cooperation with The Società Italiana di Storia delle Matematiche (Italian Society of History of Mathematics), to be awarded to an original research paper on the theme “female mathematicians in history.” The prize celebrates Maria Gaetana Agnesi (1718-1799) in the Third Centennial of her birth.

…………

Theodore Porter (University of California, Los Angeles) has recently published Genetics in the Madhouse: The Unknown History of Human Heredity (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018).

…………

Greg Priest (Stanford University) has been awarded the Selma V. Forkosch Prize for 2017. The Forkosch Prize recognizes the best article published in the Journal of the History of Ideas during the year. Priest received the prize for “Charles Darwin’s Theory of Moral Sentiments: What Darwin’s Ethics Really Owes to Adam Smith,” Journal of the History of Ideas 78, no. 4 (October 2017): 571-593.

…………

Ezelle Sanford III (Princeton University) was awarded the Ford Foundation Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Through its program of highly competitive Fellowships, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students. This award will support the completion of Ezelle’s dissertation titled “A Source of Pride, a Vision of Progress: The Homer G. Phillips Hospital of St. Louis, MO (1937-1979)” which employs the history of the largest segregated hospital in the United States to trace the rise and ostensible fall of racially segregated hospital care.

…………

David Sepkoski (Max Planck Institute) will be returning to the US as the new occupant of the Thomas M. Siebel Chair in History of Science at the University of Illinois.

…………

Mark Solovey (University of Toronto) has recently completed a book manuscript called “Social Science for What? Public Funding for the ‘Other Sciences’ at the U.S. National Science Foundation since World War Two” and an essay manuscript called “The Impossible Dream: Scientism as Strategy against Distrust of Social Science at the U.S. National Science Foundation, 1945-1980.” Both projects are under review.

He is also co-editor (with historian of science/medicine Deborah Weinstein) for a special issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences on the topic “Living Well: Histories of Emotions, Wellness & Human Flourishing.”

For the 2018 International Sociological Association’s World Congress of Sociology to be held in Toronto in July, he is co-organizer with Christian Daye (historian of sociology/sociologist) of two sessions on the theme “Cold War Social and Behavioral Sciences: International and Transnational Entanglements.” Both are planning an edited volume of essays on the same topic.

…………

Pamela Smith (Columbia University), the Seth Low Professor of History and Director of the Center for Science and Society, has been awarded the 2017-2018 Columbia University Faculty Mentoring Award. This award is given by the Graduate Student Advisory Council to commemorate excellence in the mentoring of PhD and MA students. This award is a student initiative; selections were made entirely by graduate student representatives from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and affiliated schools based on student nomination letters spanning across all disciplines.

…………

Michael Stolberg (University of Würzburg) is the director of the Würzburg project on Early Modern Physicians’ Correspondences, which now offers free online access to the records of about 40,000 letters from more than 200 libraries and archives in Germany and abroad. The project aims at a systematic survey of surviving letters that were written, usually in Latin or German, by a German-speaking learned physician or addressed to him, between 1500 and 1700. In addition to the metadata, thousands of entries offer a detailed summary, in German. The project has been running since 2009 with funding from the Union of the German Academies of the Sciences and Humanities and is expected to finish its work in 2023.

…………

C Michele Thompson (Southern Connecticut State University), with co-editors Hans Pols and John Harley Warner, recently published Translating the Body: Medical Education in Southeast Asia (Singapore: National University of Singapore Press, 2017).

…………

Alain Touwaide again served as a Visiting Professor at UCLA during the spring term 2018. He taught two courses: Department of Classics: Food and Medicine in Antiquity and the Department of Comparative Literature: Foundations of Western Medicine. From Hippocrates to Vesalius.

…………

Peter Usher (Pennsylvania State University) has recently published “Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and the New Astronomy” in Notes & Queries 65, no. 1 (March 2018): 81-83.

Please visit his new website: Shakespeare, Digges, and the Dawn of Modern Science.

…………

John Wilkins (University of Melbourne) has recently published Species: The Evolution of the Idea, 2nd edition, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2018.

…………

M. Norton Wise (University of California, Los Angeles) recently published Aesthetics, Industry, and Science: Hermann von Helmholtz and the Berlin Physical Society, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018.

…………

Audra Wolfe (freelance writer) will publish Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018) this November.

…………

Dominik Wujastyk (University of Alberta) would like to draw members’ attention to the journal History of Science in South Asia (HSSA, ISSN 2369-775X). This is a relatively new journal, now in its sixth year of publishing.

HSSA is Open Access; authors retain copyright; there are no article processing fees. The journal is published on the OJS platform generously supported by the University of Alberta Libraries eJournal Hosting System.

We take “South Asia” as an inclusive, non-political, socio-geographic term referring to the area from Afghanistan to Sri Lanka, from Pakistan to Bangladesh, and of course India. Research on the influences of South Asian cultures beyond these borders is also welcome, for example, Nepalese or Tibetan influences on China, Sri Lankan influences on the Maldives, or Indian influences in South-East Asia.

We take “science” to be broadly conceived, and to include all forms of rigorous intellectual activity that adopt at least to some extent a quantitative and empirical approach, as in the German “Die Wissenschaft,” that covers most forms of academic scholarship. Theoretical discussions of the meaning of “science” in the South Asian context are implicit in many of the articles published and are explicitly welcomed.