July 2014 Newsletter

 

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Vol. 43, No. 3, July 2014
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From the HSS Editorial Office

One hundred years ago, Germany invaded Belgium and George Sarton, together with his wife, his daughter, and his fledgling journal Isis left his home town of Ghent. He went to England first and then settled in the United States for good. Today, as you are reading these words, the journal that Sarton edited for forty years is, likewise on board ship, crossing the Atlantic in the opposite direction. Its destination is not Belgium but the Netherlands—the northern one of the two nations that inhabit what is widely known as the Low Countries.   In the first week of my editorship, which started on July 1, we have been setting up shop at the new Isis office at Utrecht University. Click here to continue . . .

Society Executive Director Jay Malone talks about the strategic planning process for the HSS. Click here to continue . . .

History of Science Society Strategic Planning Interim Report

In 2013, the History of Science Society celebrated the centennial of Isis. In 2024 we will celebrate the centennual of the HSS itself, and the HSS Executive Committee believes that the Society should examine our mission and position ourselves favorably for our second century. Jay Malone reports on the initial findings of the strategic planning process. Click here to continue . . .

Innovations in Education Series: Teaching Those Who Teach Evolution: The Khan Academy Approach

Evolutionary concepts underlie all bioscience teaching, yet it is claimed that “our current educational system rarely, if ever, attempts to teach them in a serious and effective manner” (Klymkowsky 2011). Indeed, there is a “pervasive reluctance of teachers to forthrightly explain evolutionary biology.” So conclude Berkman and Plutzer (2011) from their national survey of US high school biology teachers. Among their “strategies for avoiding controversy” are teaching various aspects of microevolution (e.g. genetics, molecular biology) and “completely ignoring” the “macroevolution of species.” The proposed solution is to focus on obtaining “better trained teachers” by “improving the instruction they receive on evolution as undergraduates.” But this goal is to be achieved merely by making evolution a requirement for college level education courses. Although an important step, the possibility that there might be problems with the instruction itself has not been considered (Berkman and Plutzer 2012). I here suggest why college level instruction may be inadequate and, indeed, partly responsible for this “pervasive reluctance” to teach evolutionary concepts. Furthermore, I propose remedies. Click here to continue . . .

Member News

News from members of the History of Science Society. Click here to continue . . .

Announcements from the Graduate and Early Career Caucus (GECC)

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Survey Responses from the 2013 Meeting of the History of Science Society

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In Memoriam

Memorial information about members of the History of Science Society. Click to continue . . .

News from the Profession

News from the History of Science. Click to continue . . .

Humanities Indicators: New Website, Publication, and Data Forum

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The ACLS Humanities E-Book and the HSS

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The Society: Donors to the Society 2013

As more and more people freely share their work and their lives with a world-wide audience, (e.g. Linked In and Facebook) many individuals now question the need and the value of publishers. Since the HSS is developing a strategic plan for the future, now is a good time to examine the various moving parts of the Society. Click to continue . . .

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