January 2019 Member News

Ellen Abrams (Cornell University), Vyta Baselice, and John Lisle shared the grand prize World War I and the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council: A Research Competition for research papers written by scholars under 30 about how scientists and engineers in the United States were engaged in the World War I effort.

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Helmholz: A Life in Science
David Cahan
(University of Nebraska – Lincoln) recently published Helmholtz: A Life in Science (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

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Andreas Daum (State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo), Department of History, was awarded a Humboldt Research Award, also called Humboldt Prize, by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The award is granted in recognition of a researcher’s entire achievements to date. He is invited to spend the academic year 2019-20 at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. His brief biography of Alexander von Humboldt will be published in February 2019 by C. H. Beck Publishers.

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Fred Whipple’s Empire: The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 1955-1973David H. DeVorkin (Smithsonian Institution) recently published Fred Whipple’s Empire: The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 1955-1973 (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2018).

Fred Whipple’s Empire explores the forces and drives that brought two astronomical institutions together-the Astrophysical Observatory of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and the Harvard College Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts-to become the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in the early 1970s, one of the largest institutions devoted to astronomy and space science in the world. View the free ebook here.

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A Century of Geneticists: Mutation to MedicineKrishna Dronamraju (Foundation for Genetic Research, Houston, Texas) recently published A Century of Geneticists: Mutation to Medicine (CRC Press, 2018).

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Richard Duschl was named Executive Director of Southern Methodist University’s Caruth Institute for Engineering Education & Texas Instrument Distinguished Chair in the Lyle School of Engineering. The Institute’s mission is to become a national center of excellence in researching, developing, delivering, and evaluating new and innovative K-16 STEM and Engineering Education programs, in engineering education policy research, and in the public’s understanding of STEM initiatives and engineering education.

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Matthew Daniel Eddy (Durham University) was promoted to Chair and Professor of the History and Philosophy of Science at Durham University.

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Andrew Fiss (Michigan Technological University) recently published “Structures of Antifeminism: Drugs and Women’s Education in the Texts of Dr. Clarke” in Peitho 21, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 2018): 81-103. MTU’s news office ran a story about the article:

Kelley Christensen, “Gender, Drugs and Education: A History of STEM Antifeminism,Michigan Tech News, 8 November 2018.

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Robert Fox (University of Oxford) received the Gustav Neuenschwander Prize, the main prize of the European Society for the History of Science, at the society’s biennial conference in London in September 2018. The prize is awarded every two years for outstanding life-long achievements and major contributions to the discipline of the history of science. The prize follows the award of the History of Science Society’s George Sarton Medal in 2015 and the Alexandre Koyré Medal of the International Academy of the History of Science in 2016.

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The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican ChinaJia-Chen Fu (Emory University) recently published The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2018).

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Joseph Gal (University of Colorado, emeritus) recently published “In Defense of Louis Pasteur: Critique of Gerald Geisons’s Deconstruction of Pasteur’s Discovery of Molecular Chirality” (Chirality in Press, 2018).

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Daniel Goldstein (University of California, Davis) is actively involved in the struggle to protect/assert academic freedom, which seems to be an issue at more and more universities these days. At the University of California, it has broken out in the context of the librarians’ contract (we’re unionized) and is spreading from there. He was interviewed recently for AFT Voices, the online news site of the American Federation of Teachers.

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Einstein's Italian Mathematicians: Ricci, Levi-Civita, and the Birth of General RelativityJudith Goodstein (California Institute of Technology) recently published Einstein’s Italian Mathematicians: Ricci, Levi-Civita, and the Birth of General Relativity (Providence: American Mathematical Society, 2018).

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Melinda Gormley (University of California, Irvine) who is HSS’s representative to Section L of AAAS, and also Section L Secretary, would like to announce the newly elected AAAS Fellows for the section on History and Philosophy of Science:

  • Helen E. Longino, Stanford University
  • Jürgen Renn, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Germany)
  • James Francis Woodward, University of Pittsburgh

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Hans-Jürgen Treder: Ein PorträtHans J. Haubold (United Nations) would like to announce the new book Hans-Jürgen Treder: Ein Porträt by Monika Schulz-Fieguth (Potsdam: Christian & Cornelius Ruess, 2018).

Hans-Jürgen Treder, lead physicist of the German Democratic Republic (better known as East Germany, 1949-1990), would have celebrated his 90th birthday on 4 September 2018.

The renowned photographer, Monika Schulz-Fieguth, accompanied Treder for more than 30 years to capture his life in society and in science that reflected an unusual personality at the highest standards of research in astronomy, physics, mathematics, and philosophy on a day-to-day basis. Treder was able to secure space and time for intense research work in his professional environment ranging from the solar neutrino problem to the meaning of quantum gravity. He supported actively the United Nations’ efforts to make available education and science to nations worldwide.

The book (in German), containing essays on social and scientific life, 128 pages, 103 b/w photos, ISBN 978-3-00-060245-0, Euro 35.00, can be ordered by writing to the author and photographer at m@schulz-fieguth.de or visiting www.schulzfieguth.de.

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The Ark and Beyond: The Evolution of Zoo and Aquarium ConservationExpeditionary Anthropology: Teamwork, Travel, and the ‘Science of Man'Pamela Henson (Smithsonian Institution) recently published “Looking at Culture through an Artist’s Eyes: William Henry Holmes and the Exploration of Native American Archaeology” in Expeditionary Anthropology: Teamwork, Travel, and the ‘Science of Man,’ edited by M. Thomas and A. Harris, pp. 128-49 (New York: Berghahn Books, 2018).

She also published “American Zoos: A Shifting Balance between Recreation and Conservation” in The Ark and Beyond: The Evolution of Zoo and Aquarium Conservation, edited by B. Minteer, J. Maienschein, and J.P. Collins, pp. 65-76 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

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Bruce J. Hunt (University of Texas at Austin) recently published “Imperial Science: Victorian Cable Telegraphy and the Making of ‘Maxwell’s Equations’” in Proceedings of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 106, no. 8 (Aug. 2018): 1458-65.

The article was drawn from the George Sarton Memorial Lecture on the History and Philosophy of Science, which he delivered at the February 2018 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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The Secular EnlightenmentMargaret Jacob (UCLA) recently published The Secular Enlightenment (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019).

She also recently published “The Left, Science Studies, and Global Warming,” in editors Michael J. Thompson and Gregory R. Smulewicz-Zucker’s Anti-Science and the Assault on Democracy: Defending Reason in a Free Society (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2018) pp.123-130.

 

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Being Modern: The Cultural Impact of Science in the Early Twentieth CenturyFrank James (UCL/Royal Institution) recently published Being Modern: The Cultural Impact of Science in the Early Twentieth Century (London: UCL Press, 2018) with co-editors Robert Bud, Paul Greenhalgh, and Morag Shiach.

A PDF of this book can be downloaded for free from the UCL Press website.

 

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The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold WarEdward Jones-Imhotep (York University) was awarded the Society for the History of Technology’s Sidney Edelstein Prize for his book The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017). The prize is awarded to the author of an outstanding scholarly book in the history of technology published during the preceding three years.

 

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Empathy: A HistorySusan Lanzoni (Harvard University) recently published Empathy: A History (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2018).

 

 

 

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The Relevance of PhilosophyEdward MacKinnon (California State University East Bay, emeritus) recently published The Relevance of Philosophy (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2018) and “The role of a posteriori mathematics in physics” in Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 62 (2018), 166-175.

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Paolo Mancosu (University of California, Berkeley) was awarded the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award, which the Humboldt Foundation describes as granted to “internationally renowned academics… whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future.”

Abstraction and InfinityMancosu used the award to spend the period from January to July 2018 at the Center for Mathematical Philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich.

He also recently published Abstraction and Infinity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017).

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Philip Marston (Washington State University) recently published the following articles: “Humblet’s angular momentum decomposition applied to radiation torque on metallic spheres using the Hagen–Rubens approximation” in Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 220 (November 2018): 97–105.

Maxwell–Thomson–Loschmidt reversal” in Nature Physics 13 (January 2017): 2, and

James Clerk Maxwell and the physics of sound” in Acoustics Today 12, no. 4 (December 2016): 20-8.

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Janice Gunther Martin (University of Notre Dame) is pleased to announce the formation and incorporation of the Equine History Collective (EHC), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. The EHC promotes the horse as a lens for trans-regional history, and serves as an interface for related historical research in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. The organization just successfully completed its first annual conference, held at Cal Poly Pomona in partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library, on the theme “Why Equine History Matters.” To learn more about the EHC, get EHC blog alerts, and become a member, visit equinehistory.org, or e-mail equinehistory@gmail.com. Katrin Boniface of UC Riverside serves as president, Dr. Kathryn Renton of the Getty Research Institute as treasurer, and Janice Gunther Martin as secretary.

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Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of TechnologyAdrienne Mayor (Berggruen Fellow 2018-19, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University) recently published Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018).

Gods and Robots, published on 27 November 2018, so far has been reviewed by the Economist, Spectator, Gizmodo, London Times, among others, and featured in the Guardian Digital Culture Podcast.

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Sara Miles (retired) recently gave two lectures to church groups. In September she spoke at a large ELCA church near Toledo, Ohio, on “Issues Affecting Society’s Attitudes toward Science and Religion.” In November she spoke at the Presbytery of the PCUSA in St. Louis on “Scientific Issues that the Church Needs to Think About.” In both cases, the audience raised questions concerning the history of science and how to integrate science and Christianity.

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Worlds of Natural HistoryBrian Ogilvie (University of Massachusetts Amherst) recently published “Visions of Ancient Natural History” in Worlds of Natural History, edited by Helen Curry, Nicholas Jardine, James Secord, and Emma Spary (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).

 

 

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For the Birds: American Ornithologist Margaret Morse NiceMarilyn Ogilvie (University of Oklahoma) recently published For the Birds: American Ornithologist Margaret Morse Nice (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2018).

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Raffaele Pisano (Lille University) was elected (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) President of the Inter-Divisional Teaching Commission (IDTC) in 2017. This commission is under the IUHPST/DLMPST/DHST. (Since 2011, he also served IDTC as Vice-President elected in Nancy, France). He is Full Professor at the Lille University, France.

Research: History of Physics, Physics and Mathematics Relationship into the History, Nature of Science Teaching-NoS.

Teaching: “History of Physics” (at the Lille Science and Technology), “History of Science & Scientific Teaching Activities, etc.” (at the Lille Humanities and Social Sciences) and “History of Modern Physics/Science and Society” (at the École supérieure de journalisme de Lille).

The Dialogue between Sciences, Philosophy and Engineering. New Historical and Epistemological Insights: Homage to Gottfried W. Leibniz 1646-1716Hypotheses and Perspectives in History and Philosophy of Science: Homage to Alexandre Koyré 1892-1964,He and Paolo Bussotti recently published “On the Conceptualization of Force in Johannes Kepler’s Corpus: an Interplay between Physics/Mathematics and Metaphysics” in Hypotheses and Perspectives in History and Philosophy of Science: Homage to Alexandre Koyré 1892-1964, foreword by Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, edited by Raffaele Pisano, Joseph Agassi, Daria Drozdova, 295-346 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2017).

He and Paolo Bussotti also recently published “Historical and Philosophical Details on Leibniz’s Planetary Movements as Physical-Structurale Model” in The Dialogue between Sciences, Philosophy and Engineering. New Historical and Epistemological Insights: Homage to Gottfried W. Leibniz 1646-1716, foreword by Eberhard Knobloch, edited by Raffaele Pisano, Michel Fichant, Agamenon Oliveira, Paolo Bussotti, 49-92 (London: London College Publication, 2017).

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Duris Pascal (University of Bordeaux) was awarded the Prix Passet 2017 of the Entomological Society of France for the book he wrote with Elvire Diaz, The Factory of Entomology: Léon Dufour (1780-1865) (Pessac: University Presses of Bordeaux, 2017).

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Alexander Pavuk (Morgan State University) recently published “The American Association for the Advancement of Science Committee on Evolution and the Scopes Trial: Race, Eugenics, and Public Science in the U.S.A.” in Historical Research 91, no. 251 (February 2018): 137-159.

Free open access to the complete article is included as part of a journal sample issue.

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Greg Priest (Stanford University) recently published “Tools of Reason: The Practice of Scientific Diagramming from Antiquity to the Present” in a special issue of Endeavour 42, nos. 2-3 (2018), 49-188, with co-editors Paula Findlen and Silvia De Toffoli.

Included in that same issue are “Diagramming Evolution: The Case of Darwin’s Trees” in Endeavour 42, nos. 2-3 (2018), 157-171, along with “Tools of Reason” in Endeavour 42, nos. 2-3 (2018), 49-59, with Silvia De Toffoli and Paula Findlen.

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Jamil Ragep (McGill University) would like to announce that the Islamic Scientific Manuscripts Initiative (ISMI) is pleased to launch its public website. ISMI is a collaborative project that is directed jointly by Dr. Sally Ragep and Prof. Jamil Ragep at McGill University, Montreal, and by Prof. Lorraine Daston at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG Berlin). The senior technical researcher is Dr. Robert Casties (MPIWG Berlin). Further information appears later in this Newsletter.

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Karen Randall (Propolis Press) recently published The Leyden Jar: A Biography (Northampton: Propolis Press, 2018).

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A People's History of Computing in the United StatesJoy Rankin (Independent scholar) recently published A People’s History of Computing in the United States (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 2018).

 

 

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Acetylene and Its Polymers: 150+ Years of HistorySeth C. Rasmussen (North Dakota State University) recently published Acetylene and Its Polymers: 150+ Years of History (Heidelberg: Springer, 2018) and “Revisiting the Early History of Synthetic Polymers: Critiques and New Insights” in Ambix 65, no. 4 (November 2018): 356-372.

He was also elected as the 2019 Chair-Elect for the History of Chemistry (HIST) Division of the American Chemical Society. He will become Chair of the Division in 2021.

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Vast Expanses: A History of the OceansHelen M. Rozwadowski (University of Connecticut, Avery Point) recently published Vast Expanses: A History of the Oceans (London: Reaktion Books, 2018).

 

 

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Charles Edward of Saxe-Coburg: The German Red Cross and the Plan to Kill “Unfit” Citizens 1933-1945Talking Back against the Nazi Scheme to Kill the Handicapped Citizens of Germany 1933-1945Alan Rushton (Huntington Medical Center) recently published Talking Back against the Nazi Scheme to Kill the Handicapped Citizens of Germany 1933-1945 (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018) and Charles Edward of Saxe-Coburg: The German Red Cross and the Plan to Kill “Unfit” Citizens 1933-1945 (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018).

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Jeremy Schneider (Princeton University) recently published “The First Mite: Insect Genealogy in Hooke’s MicrographiaAnnals of Science 75, no. 3 (2018), 165-200.

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Practicing Relativism in the Anthropocene: On Science, Belief, and the HumanitiesBarbara Herrnstein Smith (Duke University) recently published Practicing Relativism in the Anthropocene: On Science, Belief, and the Humanities (London: Open Humanities Press, 2018).

 

 

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The Road to Universal Health Coverage: Innovation, Equity and the New Health EconomyJeffrey L. Sturchio (Rabin Martin) recently published The Road to Universal Health Coverage: Innovation, Equity and the New Health Economy with co-editors Ilona Kickbusch and Louis Galambos (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018).

He also published “Global Health Disruptors: The Global Healthcare Market” (BMJ, 30 November 2018) and “The Professionalization of American Chemistry: How the German Ph.D. Model Crossed the Atlantic,” with Ned D. Heindel and James J. Bohning in editor Seth C. Rasmussen’s Igniting The Chemical Ring Of Fire: Historical Evolution Of The Chemical Communities Of The Pacific Rim (World Scientific, 2018, pp.387-425).

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Kenneth L. Taylor (University of Oklahoma) was awarded the Prix Eugène Wegmann by the Société Géologique de France, at its annual meeting in October 2018.

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Alain Touwaide is a Visiting Professor in the Department of History of Medicine, University of Rome “La Sapienza,” for a 6-week period. He researches the epidemiology of antiquity, with a focus on malaria in ancient Rome. Besides, he delivers lectures on the history of botany and medicine.

During the winter term (January-March 2019), he will be teaching the course “Mediterranean Medical Traditions: Comparative Perspectives: at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

He and Eric Yarnel recently published “Accuracy of Dioscorides’ De materia medica (1st century C.E.) regarding diuretic activity of plants” in Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2018.

He and E. Appetiti recently published “Searching for Chinese Medicinal Plants in Greek Classical Medicine: A First Approach” in Chinese Medicine and Culture 1 (2018): 40-45.

Greek Alchemy from Late Antiquity to Early ModernityGreek Manuscript Cataloguing: Past, Present, and FutureHe also recently published “Towards a Catalogue of Greek Medical Manuscripts” in Greek Manuscript Cataloguing: Past, Present, and Future, edited by Paolo Degni and Paolo Eleute, 111-118 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2018).

He also recently published “The Alchemical Manuscript Tradition. An Overview” in Greek Alchemy from Late Antiquity to Early Modernity, edited by Efthymios Nicolaidis, 41-54 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2018).

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Katelyn Horstman, a UCLA undergraduate astrophysics student, working with HSS member Virginia Trimble as a summer intern, recently completed, wrote up, posted on arXiv, and submitted to Scientometrics a paper titled A Citation History of Measurements of Newton’s Constant of Gravity.

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Pasquale Tucci (Università degli Studi di Milano, emeritus) and Clara Silvia Roero recently published I Diari Berlinesi (1857-1859) di Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli (Torino: Deputazione Subalpina di Storia Patria e Centro di Studi per la Storia dell’Università di Torino, 2018).

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Calculation and Computation in the Pre-electronic Era: The Mechanical and Electrical AgesAristotle Tympas (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens) recently published Calculation and Computation in the Pre-electronic Era: The Mechanical and Electrical Ages (London: Springer, 2017).

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Peter D. Usher (Pennsylvania State University) recently published “Tubal, Shylock, and the Myth of Venice” in Polemos Journal of Law, Literature, and Culture (2018) 12:2, 415-428.

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Phyllis M. Tookey Kerridge and the Science of Audiometric Standardization in BritainJaipreet Virdi (University of Delaware) and Coreen McGuire recently published “Phyllis M. Tookey Kerridge and the Science of Audiometric Standardization in Britain” in British Journal of the History of Science 51, no.1 (March 2018): 123-146.

She also recently published “Prevention & Conservation: Historicizing the Stigma of Hearing Loss, 1910-1940” in Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45, no.4 (December 2017): 531-544.

She also recently published “Between Cure and Prosthesis: ‘Good Fit’ in Artificial Eardrums” in Rethinking Modern Prostheses in Anglo-American Commodity Cultures, 1820-1939, edited by Claire L. Jones, 48-69 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017).

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Robert S. Westman (University of California, San Diego) is the 2018-2019 Sarton Chair and recipient of the Sarton Medal in the History of Science awarded by the University of Ghent. Given in recognition of lifetime achievement in research, the chair is named after George Sarton. As Sarton Chair, Westman gave two public lectures in Ghent on 11 and 12 October 2018. Both presentations will be published in Sartoniana. After 19 years at UCLA, Westman joined the Department of History at UC San Diego in 1988 and became one of the founders of its Science Studies Program.

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Travis Wilds (University of Minnesota—Twin Cities) was awarded an NEH Fellowship, a year-long fellowship in support of research and writing for a book titled Empire of Exactitude: Life, Literature and the Physical Sciences in Post-Enlightenment France. The book addresses the socio-historical dynamics through which new ideals of quantification advocated by Pierre-Simon Laplace and others prevailed in French physical science, shaped the new positive sciences of life, and eventually spread across Napoleonic Europe.

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WintroubMichael Wintroub (University of California, Berkeley) was awarded the Pickstone Prize from the British Society for the History of Science. Established to commemorate the historian of science Professor John Pickstone, the Pickstone Prize is awarded every two years to the best scholarly book in the history of science. The winning book will mark a major advance in the understanding and interpretation of the scientific past.

The 2018 BSHS Pickstone Prize has been awarded to Wintroub for his book The Voyage of Thought: Navigating Knowledge across the Sixteenth-Century World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Judge Charlotte Sleigh, editor of the British Journal for the History of Science, described The Voyage of Thought as: “Extraordinary. This book changed my perspective on the history of science, pushing it far further back in chronological terms and wider in terms of possible sources than it had ever gone before.”

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HSS Digital Research Survey—with Gift Drawing

The History of Science Society is offering several gifts to those who respond to this short online survey about research in the digital environment. We are looking for responses from a wide range of individuals, from technophobes to digital natives.

The survey is designed to help the broader history of science, technology, and medicine community understand how digital resources have affected scholarship in the field.and is intended for those who work in history of science, technology, or medicine (or allied fields) at all levels: students, researchers, teachers, librarians, and curators.

The survey is designed by HSS’s Bibliographer, Stephen Weldon (IsisCB Explore and the Isis Current Bibliography) and two members of the Technology and Communication Committee: Kathleen Sheppard and Margaret Gaida.

If you complete the survey, you can elect to be entered in to a drawing to receive either a $25 gift card (for HSS members), or a 2019 one-year e-membership to the History of Science Society with access to Isis and other benefits. Two awards of each type are available. The drawing will be held in early 2019. (The survey is anonymous, and the drawing entry form is not connected to the survey collector.)

Once again, the link to the survey is here.

Feel free to reach out with any questions or concerns via isiscbsurvey@gmail.com.

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George Sarton Memorial Lecture in the History and Philosophy of Science

overview by Jay Malone

The Sarton Memorial Lecture is given each year at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The lecture is co-sponsored by the AAAS and the HSS (AAAS pays for the speaker’s expenses and the HSS’s Executive Committee chooses the speaker and the Society pays an honorarium). The HSS is one of the few groups with which the AAAS cosponsors a lecture. In choosing the speaker, the Executive Committee looks for someone who can speak engagingly to an audience primarily made up of scientists. The chair of Section L of AAAS (history and philosophy of science) introduces the Sarton Lecturer and the section officers take the speaker and a guest to lunch after the talk, which is typically at noon on Saturday of the AAAS meeting (right after Section L’s business meeting).

The ties between HSS and AAAS date back to HSS’s establishment. When the Society was founded on 12 January 1924, “it was decided at that meeting that the History of Science Society would cooperate as much as possible with Section L of the [AAAS], but would not identify itself too closely with it,” the reasoning being that the HSS could not bring together different groups if it took sides with any one of them. Isis 6, no. 1 [1924]: 5 . The HSS met with AAAS every other year (in off years, we met with AHA) up through 1972. The Sarton Lecture dates back to 1960. Its earliest mention in Isis is found in 1961, pp. 98-99: “At a recent meeting of the George Sarton Memorial Foundation, Inc., held in New York City in conjunction with the History of Science Society and the Section on the History and Philosophy of Science of the [AAAS], it was announced that funds are being sought to obtain a distinguished historian of science from abroad to be a featured speaker at the 10th International Congress for the History of Science, to be held at Cornell University and in Philadelphia in 1962. The Foundation also announced its intention to maintain funds for a featured speaker on the history and philosophy of science at annual meetings of AAAS.” In Isis, March 1961, p. 105 there is an announcement that the first George Sarton Memorial Lecture was delivered on December 27, 1960 at the Belmont Plaza Hotel in New York—by René Dubos on “The Scientist and the Public”—at the annual meeting of the HSS. (Isis 51, no. 3 [Sept 1960]: 255)

The George Sarton Memorial Foundation, Inc., the apparent creator of the lecture, was begun around 1958. The notice in Isis  49, part 3, no. 157 [Sept 1958]: 342 states that the Foundation’s “purpose is to promote the efforts of the late George Sarton in the history and philosophy of science” and has been organized to help maintain Isis and provide lectureships and fellowships to advance the study of the history of science. Its first president was Chauncey D. Leake of Ohio State and May Sarton (George’s only child) was its vice president. The Foundation’s first meeting was on 12 April 1958 in New York City, in the home of Alfred Hellman. Leake, who was dean of the medical college at Ohio State, was elected as president of AAAS the following year and this is the suspected origin of the Sarton Lecture being given at AAAS’s annual meeting. Little is known of the Foundation itself, which was relatively short lived. A notice in Isis 56, no. 1 [1965]: 81 reports on a resolution of the HSS Council, recommending that the HSS accept the net assets of the Foundation in the event that the assets are offered to the Society. The following year, a report in Isis announced the receipt of funds from the Foundation, which was dissolved in 1965 (Isis 57, no. 1 [1966]: 123).

The next Sarton Memorial Lecture will be in Washington DC, the Marriott Wardman Park, on Feb 17 at noon (a Sunday and not a Saturday). Karen Rader (Virginia Commonwealth University) will speak on “Science for Grown-Ups: Assessing Past & Present Adult Informal Science Education.”