Member News – April 2019

Marina Banchetti (Florida Atlantic University) published “The Function of Microstructure in Boyle’s Chemical Philosophy: ‘Chymical Atoms’ and Structural Explanation” in Foundations of Chemistry (December 2018), “Il neoplatonismo nell’ontologia chimica di Jan Baptista van Helmont” in Platone nel pensiero moderno e contemporaneo, Volume X, edited by Andrea Muni, 1-26 (Milano: Limina Mentis, 2016), and “Il minimo, l’unità, e l’universo infinito nella cosmologia vitalistica di Giordano Bruno” in Platone nel pensiero moderno e contemporaneo, Volume XV, edited by Andrea Muni, 1-12 (Milano: Limina Mentis, 2018).

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Ian Burney (University of Manchester) has been awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for 2019. He will be working on a project that seeks to place our present-day understandings of the forensic pursuit of innocence in historical perspective.

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Hugh Cagle (University of Utah) published Assembling the Tropics: Science and Medicine in Portugal’s Empire, 1450-1700 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018).

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Steve Carr (Memorial University of Newfoundland) won the Editor’s Choice Award, Genome. The award recognizes the paper as scientifically significant, topical, and of broad interest. The paper is also made free of charge at the journal website.

He was also awarded the National Geographic Society Exploration Grant in association with the Miawpukek First Nation and Terra Nova Genomics, Inc. The Miawpukek (Mi’maq) First Nation in the Bay D’Espoir region of Newfoundland, in partnership with Terra Nova Genomics, Inc., has been award the first National Geographic Society Exploration Grant given to a team in Newfoundland & Labrador. The grant will support a combined genealogical/DNA investigation of relationships among the Miawpukek First Nation and other ancient and modern Native- and Euro-American groups.

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Paula Clarke (Columbia College) and W. Ted Hamilton published “When Management Defines Leadership: High Demand x High Support in a Rural Community College” in the Journal of Transformative Leadership & Policy Studies 7, no. 2 (December 2018): 41-65.

The article represents the first of a series of planned publications about the authors’ efforts across many decades devoted to designing, implementing, and studying the impact of a High Demand x High Support teaching pedagogy in a disadvantaged setting.

Paula K. Clarke was also the recipient of the American Anthropological Association/Oxford University Press Award for Excellence in the Undergraduate Teaching of Anthropology, 2008.

  1. “Ted” Hamilton was the recipient of the CASE-Carnegie California
  2. Professor of the Year award in 2004.

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Tara Coffin (University of Washington) successfully defended her PhD Dissertation on “Social Media as a Health Communication Tool” this past December. (We hope that she takes advantage of the free HSS e-membership being offered to all newly minted PhDs).

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Erik Conway (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and Naomi Oreskes (Harvard University) co-authored an opinion piece in the New York Times in October 2018 titled “Fixing the Climate Requires More than Technology

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Camille Croteau (Western University) received a PhD Students and Early Career Academics Research Grant 2019. The PhD Students and Early Career Academics Grant Programme is one of the research programs that has been organized by the Olympic Studies Centre since 1999, aiming to support academic research related to Olympism, the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Games. The OSC has decided to support her candidature to conduct research at the OSC library in Lausanne, Switzerland to analyze the medical discourse around women in sport. Her working title is “A genealogical analysis of the female testing discourse in sports medical literature.”

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Jane Davidson (University of Nevada Reno) and Michael J. Everhart published “The Mystery of Elasmosaurus Platyurus Cope 1868, Where is the Rest of the Type Specimen?” in Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 121, no. 3-4 (2018): 335-345.

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Astrobiology, Discovery, and Societal ImpactThe Association of American Publishers has named Steven J. Dick’s (former NASA Chief Historian) book Astrobiology, Discovery, and Societal Impact (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018) as the PROSE winner for 2019 in the category of Cosmology and Astronomy. The PROSE (Professional and Scholarly Excellence) Awards are considered the Oscars of academic publishing. Dick’s book uses history, discovery, and analogy to analyze the possible impacts to humanity of discovering life beyond Earth.

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Thomas Drucker (University of Wisconsin – Whitewater) won the Distinguished Teaching Award, Wisconsin Section of the Mathematical Association of America.

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James Evans (University of Puget Sound) has been spending the year on Sabbatical to work on a project titled “On the Role of Hypothesis in Science.”

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Nahyan Fancy (DePauw University) and Justin Stearns (New York University, Abu Dhabi) received a New York University, Abu Dhabi Institute Workshop Grant for conducting a workshop, tentatively titled “Current Trends in the History of Science in Muslim Societies: Debates, Approaches and Stakes.” The workshop will take place in New York City in December 2019.

Fancy has also published articles in the following edited collections:

Reproduction: Antiquity to the Present Day“Generation in Medieval Islamic Medicine” in Reproduction: Antiquity to the Present Day, edited by Nick Hopwood, Rebecca Flemming, and Lauren Kassell, 129-140 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).

Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Galen“Galen and Ibn al-Nafīs” in Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Galen, edited by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos and Barbara Zipser, 263-278 (Leiden: Brill, 2019).

 

“Anatomy,” in 1001 Cures: Contributions in Medicine and Healthcare from Muslim Civilisation, ed. Peter Pormann, 42-51 (Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation, 2018).

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Boris Farber (Noigel, LLC; TRIZ Biopharma International, Corp; Farber’s Center for Academic Success, Inc.) won Top Biotechnologist and Top Educator of the Year for 2018 from the International Association of Top Professionals (IAOTP) and was featured in a spotlight in Marquis Who’s Who Magazine Millennium. He has also received the Da Vinci Diploma and Medal (2018, Hannover, Germany) and the Nicola Tesla Diploma and Gold Medal (2018, Energy).

Farber, Artur Martynov, and Ilya Kleyn published “Creation of New Medical Drugs Based on TRIZ and Computer Mathematical Modeling” in Annals of Mechnikov Institute 4 (December 2018): 15-34. The article was nominated for the Winner Diploma of the European Academy of Sciences in February 2019.

Since November 2018, Farber has served as CEO of TRIZ Biopharma International, Corp at 225 Broadway, Suite 1420, New York, NY, USA 10007, which specializes in R&D of new medical drugs. Since January 2019, Farber has served as Vice President of European Academy Natural Sciences, Chairman of USA Division.

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Anne Fausto-SterlingAnne Fausto-Sterling (Brown University), renowned biologist, was named the 2019 winner of the Ireland Distinguished Visiting Scholar Award.

Fausto-Sterling is the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor Emerita of Biology and Gender Studies at Brown University, where she is also the founder and former director of the Science & Technology Studies Program.

Fausto-Sterling graduated with her B.A. in zoology from the University of Wisconsin in 1965 and received her Ph.D. in developmental genetics from Brown University in 1970. Over the course of her influential career, she has taught at Brown and at a number of other institutions as a visiting professor and scholar, including Harvard University, Stanford, Radcliffe College, Mount Holyoke College, MIT, and The University of Amsterdam (Netherlands). She is currently a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Fausto-Sterling is a leader in the field of biology and gender development. Her research explores gender, sexuality, race, and technology, with a particular focus on dynamic systems theory, which explores how cultural difference becomes physiological difference. Her dynamic systems approach to human development examines the longstanding nature versus nurture debate and highlights the flaws inherent in that debate.

She is the author of more than 60 scholarly articles and three influential books that have each been translated into multiple languages: Myths of Gender: Biological Theories about Women and Men (1985), Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality (2000), and Sex/Gender: Biology in a Social World (2012). She also contributed a chapter to Critical Terms for the Study of Gender (2014).

Fausto-Sterling appears widely in major media outlets, including The New York Times and PBS, both as a commentator and as an expert reference for journalists. She is a frequent contributor to the Boston Review, Psychology Today, and the Huffington Post. She is a popular speaker and often leads higher-ed workshops on how to integrate feminist scholarship into the science curriculum.

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Amy Fisher (University of Puget Sound) has been officially recommended for tenure by the Science, Technology and Society Program and the Faculty Advancement Committee.

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Michael Gordin (Princeton University) gave a lecture on the periodic table (“D. I. Mendeleev’s Periodic Table: What Happened in February 1869?”) on the occasion of its 150th anniversary at the Feb 2019 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Anita Guerrini (Oregon State University) gave a keynote lecture, “Giants, Fossils, and the Origins of Nationalism” at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden on March 28. This public lecture was part of the Lorentz Center workshop “Types of Knowledge: Towards a New History of Concepts and Practices,” which took place from March 25-29. Anita is in residence at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, from February 26 until May 15 and then at the Descartes Center at the University of Utrecht, Netherlands, from May 15 until July 31.

She officially retired from Oregon State on 1 Jan 2019.

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Inevitably Toxic: Historical Perspectives on Contamination, Exposure and ExpertiseVivien Hamilton (Harvey Mudd College), Brinda Sarathy, and Janet Brodie published Inevitably Toxic: Historical Perspectives on Contamination, Exposure and Expertise (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018).

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Hans Haubold (United Nations, Vienna and New York) reports a followup to a lecture that Gerald Holton (Harvard University) gave in 1997 and was later published: the Robert and Maurine Rothschild Distinguished Lecture, which was titled “Einstein and the Cultural Roots of Modern Science” (Daedalus, Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, “Science in Culture” 127, no. 1, Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, (Winter 1998): 1-44), on 8 April 1997. Holton wrote that “from the list of icons of high culture at the time who greatly impressed Einstein, I must focus on just one author, indeed one who, with Friedrich Schiller, was among the most universally revered: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.” Holton refers to Friedrich Herneck’s book Einstein privat: Herta W. erinnert sich an die Jahre 1927 bis 1933 (Berlin: Buchverlag Der Morgen, 1987, 47-48) which states that Einstein kept sculptured busts of both Goethe and Schiller in his Berlin apartment in the Haberlandstrasse 5. The house was destroyed during World War II, but what was not known in detail until recently is that Einstein had presented the two busts to a relative of his house maid, Herta W., on the occasion of a visit to Einstein in the Haberlandstrasse apartment.

Unexpectedly, on 1 Feb 2019, the two busts together with a personal letter from Einstein, dated 22 March 1929, stating that he presented the two busts to Herta W.’s youngest brother, were unearthed at an auction broadcast on German television and thus were made visible to a wide audience.

The YouTube video (in German) shows in detail the expert’s evaluation of the Goethe and Schiller busts and the accompanying Einstein letter.

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War Matters: Material Culture in the Civil War EraRobert D. Hicks (College of Physicians of Philadelphia/Mütter Museum) published “Scabrous Matter: Spurious Vaccination in the Confederacy” in War Matters: Material Culture in the Civil War Era, edited by Joan Cashin, 123-150 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018).

 

Civil War Medicine: A Surgeon’s DiaryHe also edited Civil War Medicine: A Surgeon’s Diary (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2019). It features a narrative of the experience of an army regimental surgeon during the Civil War based on the hitherto unpublished diary of James Fulton, MD, Assistant Surgeon, 143rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. The volume includes contextual essays by Shauna Devine, Guy R. Hasegawa, Barbra Mann Wall, Margaret Humphreys, Randall M. Miller, and James M. Edmonson.

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Forster - Humboldt - ChamissoBrigitte Hoppe (LMUniversity of Munich) published “Erfahrungsaustausch zwischen den Naturhistorikern und Forschungsreisenden Chamisso und Martius” in Forster – Humboldt – Chamisso, edited by Julian Drews, et al., 297-313 (Goettingen: V&R unipress, 2017).

She also published “Die vergleichende Methode in der Naturforschung im Wandel” in Virchow-Forschung als Lebensaufgabe. Festschrift zum 80. Geburtstag von Christian Andree, edited by Ingo Wirth, 213-30. (Hildesheim, Zuerich, New York: Georg Olms, 2018).

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The Scientific World of Karl-Friedrich Bonhoeffer: The Entanglement of Science, Religion, and Politics in Nazi GermanyKathleen L. Housley (independent scholar) published The Scientific World of Karl-Friedrich Bonhoeffer: The Entanglement of Science, Religion, and Politics in Nazi Germany (Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019).

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Danian Hu (The City College of New York) published “文革”中的”无产阶级科学革命” — 中国科学院”相对论批判组”再考 [“The Proletarian Scientific Revolution” in the Cultural Revolution: The CAS “Relativity Criticism Group” Reexamined] in《自然科学史研究》 [Studies in the History of Natural Sciences] 37, no. 3 (2018): 327-363.

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The Afterlife of the Leiden Anatomical Collections: Hands On, Hands OffHieke Huistra (Utrecht University) published The Afterlife of the Leiden Anatomical Collections: Hands On, Hands Off (New York: Routledge, 2019). It starts where most histories end: after death. It tells the story of thousands of body parts kept in bottles and boxes in nineteenth-century Leiden — a story featuring a struggling medical student, more than one disappointed anatomist, a monstrous child, and a glorious past. Huistra blends historical analysis, morbid anecdotes, and humor to show how anatomical preparations moved into the hands of students and researchers, and out of the reach of lay audiences. In the process, she reveals what a centuries-old collection can teach us about the future fate of the biobanks we build today.

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The Ascent of John TyndallRoland Jackson (The Royal Institution of Great Britain) published The Ascent of John Tyndall (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). It was published in the US in July 2018. It is the first full biography of John Tyndall in more than 70 years.

He also published “Eunice Foote, John Tyndall and a question of priority” in Notes and Records (February 2019). The journal article is online, prior to print publication later this year. The topic (Eunice Foote and John Tyndall) is becoming a bit of a cause celebré in relation to the marginalization of women in science, and this paper offers a detailed analysis and judgement.

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Christine Keiner (Rochester Institute of Technology) won the 2019 Everett Mendelsohn Prize for her article “A Two-Ocean Bouillabaisse: Science, Politics, and the Central American Sea-Level Canal Controversy,” in the Journal of the History of Biology 50, no. 4 (2017), 835-887. The Mendelsohn Prize was instituted in 2016 to honor the founding editor of JHB, and is awarded annually to the author of an article published in the journal during the previous 3 years. The article will be freely available on the Journal of the History of Biology website during 2019.

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John Krige  (Georgia Institute of Technology) won the Francis Bacon Award in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. He will spend Fall 2019 in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at Caltech and will organize a conference on transnational approaches to the history of science and technology for spring 2020.

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Mark Largent (Michigan State University) is serving as Interim Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education.

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Pierre Laszlo edited an issue, abundantly illustrated and in press, of the Bulletin of the Sabix (Société des amis de la Bibliothèque de l’École polytechnique), devoted to the late Alfred Sauvy, an alumnus of the École. He authored or co-authored several articles in the issue, including Repères biographiques; Liste chronologique des livres publiés par Alfred Sauvy; Les fiches de lecture d’Alfred Sauvy (co authored with Pierre Couveinhes); Recension du livre d’Alfred Sauvy « Aux sources de l’humour »; and Sauvy et la langue française

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Michael R. McVaugh (University of North Carolina) edited Arnau de Vilanova, Speculum, Arnaldi de Villanova Opera Medica Omnia, vol. XIII (Barcelona: Fundació Noguera-Universitat de Barcelona, 2018).

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Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War AmericaErika Milam (Princeton University) published Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019).

 

 

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Audubon in Nova Scotia: An Excerpt from the Journals of John James AudubonEric L. Mills (Dalhousie University) edited and annotated Audubon in Nova Scotia: An Excerpt from the Journals of John James Audubon (Kentville: Gaspereau Press, 2018).

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William Newman (Indiana University) published Newton the Alchemist: Science, Enigma, and the Quest for Nature’s “Secret Fire” (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018). Newton the Alchemist is the first scholarly monograph book on Isaac Newton’s alchemy to appear in a generation. The work uses a combination of laboratory replication of Newton’s experiments and critical reading of the million-plus words he wrote on the subject to come to a radically new understanding of the role that alchemy played in his life and work. Newton the Alchemist also contains four appendices in which a number of Newton’s alchemical treatises are edited for the first time.

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Agustí Nieto-Galan (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) won the ICREA Acadèmia Prize (2018). The ICREA Academia program was launched in 2008 with the aim of contributing to the intensification of the research carried out by university professors who are in a fully active and expansive phase of their research careers. The winners of the ICREA Academia award, all of them professors at Catalonia’s public universities, receive a substantial research grant for a period of five years.

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John Abbot and William Swainson: Art, Science, and Anna Zieglerin and the Lion’s Blood: Alchemy and End Times in Reformation GermanyTara Nummedal (Brown University) published Anna Zieglerin and the Lion’s Blood: Alchemy and End Times in Reformation Germany (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019).

Nummedal, Janice Neri, and John V. Calhoun published John Abbot and William Swainson: Art, Science, and Commerce in Nineteenth-Century Natural History Illustration (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2019).

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Donald Optiz (DePaul University) began serving as Editor-in-Chief of Endeavour, a leading journal for the history and philosophy of science published by Elsevier, on 1 Jan 2019. (While serving, he continues as Associate Professor and Interim Dean in the School for New Learning at DePaul.)

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The Spanish Disquiet: the Biblical Natural Philosophy of Benito Arias MontanoMaría M. Portuondo (Johns Hopkins University) published The Spanish Disquiet: the Biblical Natural Philosophy of Benito Arias Montano (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019).

 

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American Tropics: The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity ScienceMegan Raby (University of Texas) has published American Tropics: The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity Science

 

 

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A Meaning to LifeMichael Ruse (Florida State University) published A Meaning to Life (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019).

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Edmund Russell (Carnegie Mellon University) has received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for 2019. He is writing the first scholarly book on the transcontinental telegraph, which crossed the American West in 1861. He will spend the academic year 2019-2020 working on this project at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, where he will be the Dibner Distinguished Fellow in the History of Science and Technology.

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Patience Schell (University of Aberdeen) published “Natural History Values and Meanings in Nineteenth-Century Chile” in Notes and Records 73, no. 1 (March 2019): 101-124.

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The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined FlightTimothy Schultz (U.S. Naval War College) published The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined Flight (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018).

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Angela Shaffer (American Public University System) began a master’s certificate program in European History, February 2019.

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Carlos Sierra (Universidad Nacional de Colombia) is now an Associate Professor with tenure, granted recognition under the new statute for teaching staff.

He also published:

La dimensión bioética en la historia de la guerra (Medellín: Universidad CES, 2018)

“Leonardo da Vinci: El Tony Stark del Renacimiento” in Agenda Cultural Alma Mater (Universidad de Antioquia), no. 262 (March 2019): 4-8

“Energía y equidad: La luctuosa transformación del fuego” in Revista Universidad de Antioquia, no. 332 (April-June 2018): 9-12

“La infausta transmutación del agua” in Revista Universidad de Antioquia, no. 331 (January-March 2018): 13-16

“La dimensión ética en filmes y series de televisión” in Revista de Bioética Latinoamericana 22, no. 1 (September 2018-February 2019): 171-198

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The Genius ChecklistDean Keith Simonton (University of California, Davis) published The Genius Checklist (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2018).

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Pamela Smith (Columbia University), Seth Low Professor of History and Founding Director of the Center for Science and Society, is thrilled to announce that the Center for Science and Society has been awarded a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to continue building the activities of the Center’s Research Clusters, its curriculum development and seed grants, and its public outreach programming.

The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific RevolutionShe also published a new paperback edition of The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific Revolution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

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Miriam Solomon (Temple University) has received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for 2019. She will be a Visiting Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge, and a Visiting Scholar at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Cambridge University. Her project, Evidence and Values in the DSM 5.x, uses tools from recent philosophy of science, science studies, and social epistemology to make recommendations for how to improve the ongoing process of revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM).

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Collecting Experiments: Making Big Data BiologyBruno J. Strasser (University of Geneva) published Collecting Experiments: Making Big Data Biology (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019).

 

 

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Calculation and Computation in the Pre-electronic Era: The Mechanical and Electrical AgesAristotle Tympas (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens) published Calculation and Computation in the Pre-electronic Era: The Mechanical and Electrical Ages (London: Springer, 2017).

 

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Aesthetics, Industry, and Science: Hermann von Helmholtz and the Berlin Physical SocietyNorton M. Wise (UCLA) has published Aesthetics, Industry, and Science: Hermann von Helmholtz and the Berlin Physical Society (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018).

 

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Richard Rufus of Cornwall: Sententia cum quaestionibus in libros de anima AristotelisRega Wood (Indiana University, Bloomington), et al. edited Richard Rufus of Cornwall: Sententia cum quaestionibus in libros de anima Aristotelis (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019).

 

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Richard Yeo (Griffith University) published “Hippocrates’ Complaint and the Scientific Ethos in early Modern England” in Annals of Science 75, no. 2 (2018), 73-96.

Conceptualizing the World: An Exploration across Disciplines He also published “The Individual and the ‘Intellectual Globe’: Francis Bacon, John Locke, and Vannevar Bush” in Conceptualizing the World: An Exploration across Disciplines, edited by Helge Jordheim and Erling Sandmo, 311-324 (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2019).

In collaboration with Brandon Chua, Geoff Kemp, David McInnis, and John Spurr, he also published John Locke: Literary and Historical Writings, edited by J. R. Milton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2019).

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Anya Zilberstein (Concordia University, Montreal) and Molly Warsh will be co-editors of the new book series “New/Old Natures: Histories of the Environment” with Routledge.

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Karen Rader Delivers 2019 Sarton Lecture at AAAS

Left to Right: John Powers (dashing historian of chemistry), Karen Rader (Sarton Lecturer), Betty Smocovitis (Chair of AAAS Section L)

Left to Right: John Powers (dashing historian of chemistry), Karen Rader (Sarton Lecturer), Betty Smocovitis (Chair of AAAS Section L)

 For the 2019 George Sarton Memorial Lecture in the History and Philosophy of Science, Karen Rader (Virginia Commonwealth University) provided a powerful exposé on the historical significance of science education in various media in the 20th century. Titled “Science for Grownups: Assessing Past and Present Adult STEM Education in the United States” the lecture asked the question “What if we focus on adults, rather than children, when looking at post-Sputnik science education and pause to look at successes and failures?” Using sources that ranged from Benjamin Gruenberg’s “Science and the Public Mind,” which urged policy makers in the Eisenhower Administration to establish goals for adult populations, to Catherine Mackenzie (Bierstadt), who was employed by Alexander Graham Bell and wrote a weekly column for the New York Times Magazine with a focus on mental health, Professor Rader, touched on how various popular media wielded significant influence on science literacy. What gave her lecture particular power was her ability to show the hidden assumptions in popular media, such as the made-for-tv movie “Hemo the Magnificent” (1957) directed by Frank Capra, which contained veins of religious themes that her students have found surprising in their frequency (AAAS Director, Rush Holt, who attended the lecture, reported that he remembers “Hemo,” that it influenced him, and that he did not think twice at the time about its religious themes.). She urged us to think about how re-telling these stories has the potential to re-shape STEM education, and that by knowing more about the landscape we will better understand the identities of learners and teachers who occupied these spaces, and what worked best.