April 2018 – Member News

Lindsay Alberts (Boston College) has recently published an article in the September 2017 edition of Journal of the History of Collections (Oxford): “Francesco I’s Museum: Cultural Politics at the Galleria degli Uffizi.” To read, please visit the journal website.

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In November 2017, Theodore Arabatzis’ (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens) article, “What’s in it for the Historian of Science? Reflections on the Value of Philosophy of Science for History of Science,” was published in the International Studies in the Philosophy of Science Journal (31:1 (2017), pp. 69-82).

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Andrew Butrica recently finished drafting a history of the IEEE (Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and it is currently undergoing review in preparation for publication.

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Rebecca Charbonneau (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), was recently awarded a Gates Cambridge scholarship to pursue her PhD in the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. Charbonneau’s research regards space history and the history of radio astronomy.

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Barbara Di Gennaro (Yale University) has recently published an article in the April 2017 edition of the Annals of Science: “Craft, Money and Mercy: An Apothecary’s Self-portrait in Sixteenth-century Bologna” (74 (2): pp. 91-107).

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Nahyan Fancy (DePauw University) recently hosted and organized the Second Annual Undergraduate Research Conference on Science, Technology, Medicine and Society, which took place on 9-11 March 2018 at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. For more information, please visit the conference website. Two of Fancy’s articles have been published within the past year. “Post-Avicennan Physics in the Medical Commentaries of the Mamluk Period” was published in the Intellectual History of the Islamicate World, Volume 6 Issues 1-2 on pages 55-81. In 2017, “Womb Heat versus Sperm Heat: Hippocrates against Galen and Ibn Sīnā in Ibn al-Nafīs’s Commentaries” was published in Oriens Volume 45, Issue 1-2, on pages 150-175.

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Chicago University Press has recently published Yulia Frumer’s (Johns Hopkins University) book, Making Time: Astronomical Time Measurement in Tokugawa Japan (2018).

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A documentary film on Copernicus, “Tajemnice De Revolutionibus” (“Secrets of De Revolutionibus”), directed by Michał Juszczakiewicz and produced by Robert Szaj of the Nicolaus Copernicus Foundation, has been televised on Polish public television including interviews with Owen Gingerich, André Goddu (Stonehill College), Daniel Pietro Omodeo, Jarosław Włodarczyk, and Jerzy Sikorski. The director is preparing an English version. An English translation of the announcement is available on Google by searching: Premiera filmu dokumentalnego “Tajemnice de revolutionibus.”

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Amanda Golbeck (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences) recently published her book Equivalence: Elizabeth L. Scott at Berkeley (Chapman and Hall/CRC).

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Daniel Halverson’s (Case Western Reserve University) article, “Monographs on the Universe: Americans Respond to Ernst Haeckel’s Evolutionary Science and Theology, 1866-1883” was accepted for publication by Past Tense Graduate Review of History and is due to appear in the upcoming 2018 issue.

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Gary Hatfield (University of Pennsylvania) published an article titled “Helmholtz and Philosophy: Science, Perception, and Metaphysics, with Variations on Some Fichtean Themes” in the Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6.3 (2018), 11-41. It appeared in a special issue on “Method, Science, and Mathematics: Neo-Kantianism and Analytic Philosophy.”

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Hans J. Haubold (United Nations) would like to report that The United Nations is implementing an initiative for the development of astronomy world wide (UN BSSI). They published the report on UN BSSI covering the period from 1991 to 2012 and beyond. The report provides information on planetariums, astronomical telescopes, space weather instrument networks, and publications generated by UN BSSI.

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The section for history of science and technology (GNT), directed by Prof. Dr. Klaus Hentschel (University of Stuttgart, Germany), just celebrated its 50th anniversary since its foundation right after the transformation of the former Stuttgart Polytech into a University. Its chairs have been professors Armin Hermann (for 33 years), Moritz Epple and (since 2006) Klaus Hentschel. Specialities of GNT in Stuttgart are: history of the physical sciences and of research technologies, biographical & prosopographic studies & databases (such as DSI on illustrators), visual cultures of science & technology; comparative history; interplay of experimentation, instrumentation & concept formation; gender studies & history of mentalities.

A large jubilee volume with many photographs and full documentation of publications, talks, teaching and research activities throughout these years has just been published by Klaus Hentschel (ed.) “50 Jahre GNT,” Stuttgart, Berlin & Diepholz, 2018, ISBN 978-3-86225-110-0.html. For information about the program, please visit www.uni-stuttgart.de/hi/gnt.

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Emily Herring’s (University of Leeds) article, “‘Great is Darwin and Bergson his Poet’: Julian Huxley’s Other Evolutionary Synthesis” was published in the Annals of Science 75(1), pp. 40-54. It is available online.

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As part of the University of Michigan’s celebration of its bicentennial, Dea Boster and Joel Howell (University of Michigan) co-authored a new history of the medical school, Medicine at Michigan: A History of the University of Michigan Medical School at the Bicentennial (University of Michigan Press, 2017).

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Edward Jones-Imhotep (York University) was awarded the Abbot Payson Usher Prize from the Society for the History of Technology for “Malleability and Machines: Glenn Gould and the Technological Self,” Technology and Culture 57 (2016): 287-321. He has also recently published The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press, 2017).

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Henk Kubbinga (University of Groningen) published Making molecularism III. Catalogus librorum &c. Selected papers III (Groningen University Press) as part of a series on the history of the atomic and molecular theory. The focus this time is on the role of libraries, from Piso’s library at Herculaneum—where Lucretius, about 60 BCE, forged his De rerum natura, in praise of the atomic theory—over the library of the inventor of the molecular theory, Isaac Beeckman (who, ca.1620 CE, used Lucretius’ poem), to that of a modern specialist in the field. The book is at once a massive plea for the creation, under the wings of the European Physical Society at Mulhouse (France), of the Albert Einstein Library, as a safe haven for the paper ware of the past that made the history of Physics and which, in our e-Era, counts among the endangered species.

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Susan Lamb (Hannah Chair in History of Medicine at the University of Ottawa) was invited to give the prestigious Heberden Society Lecture at the New York Academy of Medicine. Professor Lamb’s public lecture was introduced by Rosemary Stevens and explained why the ideas of psychiatrist Adolf Meyer remain at the center of debates in American psychiatry today more than a century after their introduction.

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In 2017, Ed Larson (Pepperdine University) and Michael Ruse (Florida State University) published the book, On Faith and Science, with Yale University Press. In 2018, Ed published the monograph, To the Edges of the Earth: 1908, the Race for the Three Poles, and the Climax of the Age of Exploration, with HarperCollins. An advance review in Booklist noted that it is, “a fine psychological study, a story of bravery and obsession and men who pushed themselves to the edge of sanity. Larson, who won a Pulitzer Prize in history for his book about the Scopes Trial (Summer for the Gods, 1997), is a meticulous writer, telling us not just what happened on the three expeditions but-whenever possible-why and how the success or failure of these voyages of discovery would impact the very future of exploration itself.”

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Lewis Laska (Tennessee State University) has been working on A Cumulative Index to Scientific American, 1845-1947 for several years and the end is now in sight with 340,000 entries. There is currently no cumulative index to Sciam, which led to Laska’s work. If you would like to assist in this venture, please contact him at Lewis L. Laska, P.O. Box 252, Madison, TN 37116, (615) 491-2928, llaska@verdictslaska.com.

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Daniel Lewis’s (Huntington Library) book Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai’i will be published in April 2018 (Yale University Press).

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David Luesink’s (Sacred Heart University) article, “Anatomy and the Reconfiguration of Life and Death in Republican China” was published in the Journal of Asian Studies 76, no. 4 (November 2017): 1009-034.

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In late 2017, Smithsonian Secretary David O. Skorton named Michael J. Neufeld (Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum), a Senior Curator at the National Air and Space Museum, a Smithsonian Distinguished Scholar, the highest research honor of the Smithsonian Institution.

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Agustí Nieto-Galan (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) has been promoted to a Full Professorship in History of Science at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

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Sayaka Oki (Nagoya University) recently published an article “Œ/Économie and Science in France during the Age of Social Reform: Agronomy, Natural History and Political Arithmetic” in The Foundations of Political Economy and Social Reform: Economy and Society in Eighteenth Century France, edited by Ryuzo Kuroki and Yusuke Ando published by Routeledge in January 2018.

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Hyung Wook Park (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) has published “Managing Failure: Sir Peter Brian Medawar’s Transplantation Research,” Notes and Records: The Royal Society Journal of the History of Science 72 (2018), pp. 75-100.

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Kevin Schindler (Lowell Observatory) has written a new book with planetary scientist Will Grundy titled Pluto and Lowell Observatory: A History of Discovery at Flagstaff (History Publishing, 2018).

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Angela Shaffer (American Public University System) is currently instructing “Medieval to Modern World 800 C.E. – 1750 C.E.” and “World Mythology” at Front Range Community College, Boulder County Campus, Colorado. The former assists scholars with embodying personages from the Scientific Revolution in an active learning setting. Segments include Think-Tank Challenge and Thought Experiments in which scholars use imaginary time travel in order to relate to the medieval mindset. World Mythology makes a case for an evolutionary perspective of antiquity as told through myth, examining reality with a strong focus on natural philosophy.

Shaffer also completed and submitted her first grant proposal for an undergraduate scholarly journal that demands interdisciplinary research methodology and objective writing. Uniting art and science, the Humanities Mythology conference will introduce accomplishing associates to academic society, preparing scholars for further study in higher-education.

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Willis Shirk’s (Meraki Enterprises LLC) latest book, A History of the Atomic Space Age and Its Implications for the Future has just been published (Dog Ear Publishing, 2018). More information can be found at https://www.wshirk.com.

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Asteroid 1978VT8 (which describes when it was discovered) has been renamed after Virginia Trimble (University of California, Irvine) and is now called 9271Trimble. Virginia has also just been elected a Patron of the American Astronomical Society (whose Historical Astronomy Division she formerly chaired) by its Board of Directors.

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The Science History Institute has released a documentary film that Roger Turner (Science History Institute) has worked on as a researcher for the last two years. “The Instrumental Chemist” explores the life of Arnold Beckman, including beautifully filmed scenes of people who continue to use today’s descendants of the scientific instruments Beckman developed. For more information, visit https://www.sciencehistory.org/arnold-o-beckman-legacy-project.

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Peter D. Usher (The Pennsylvania State University) has published “Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and the New Astronomy.” Notes & Queries 65:1, 81-83, 2018.

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Ronald Vasile’s first book, William Stimpson and the Golden Age of American Natural History, will be published in June 2018 by Northern Illinois University Press.

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Elizabeth Watkins (University of California, San Francisco) was named the 2018 American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellow in the History of American Obstetrics and Gynecology. This grant will support archival research for her project, “IUDs and Implants: How Long-Acting Contraception Made a Comeback in 21st Century America.”

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Simon Werrett (University College London) and Lissa Roberts (University of Twente) are pleased to announce the publication of an edited volume of essays, titled Compound Histories: Materials, Governance and Production, 1760-1840 (Leiden: Brill, 2017). The book is available to download for free via Brill’s Open Access site. Compound Histories offers a new view of the period during which Europe took on its modern character and globally dominant position. By exploring the intertwined realms of production, governance and materials, it places chemists and chemistry at the center of processes most closely identified with the construction of the modern world. Rather than emphasize revolutionary breaks and the primacy of innovation-driven change, the volume highlights the continuities and accumulation of incremental changes that framed historical development. Contributors are: Robert G.W. Anderson, Bernadette Bensaude Vincent, José Ramón Bertomeu Sánchez, John R.R. Christie, Joppe van Driel, Frank A.J.L. James, Christine Lehman, Lissa L. Roberts, Thomas le Roux, Elena Serrano, Anna Simmons, Marie Thébaud-Sorger, Sacha Tomic, Andreas Weber, and Simon Werrett.