April 2015 Member News

Rima D. Apple, PhD was recently named Professor Extraordinarius, at the Institute for Gender Studies, at UNISA (University of South Africa), Pretoria, South Africa.

…………

Carlo Artemi has published a paper titled “‘Citizen Criminology’: An Example from a (Very) Strange Italy-Vatican Case” in Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 206-210. He reports that this paper is probably the first, or one of the first, in the world to present criminological implications of Citizen Science. The reference is to the very mysterious case of Emanuela Orlandi’s disappearance.

…………

Alexandra Bacopoulos-Viau has been awarded the 2014 Forum for the History of the Human Sciences Dissertation Prize for “Scripting the Mind: Automatic Writing in France, 1857–1930,” University of Cambridge, 2013. Dr. Bacopoulos-Viau, is now a postdoc in the Department of History at NYU.

…………

Marcia Bartusiak’s (MIT) book, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved will be published by Yale University Press in April 2015.

…………

Sarah Bridger’s (California Polytechnic State University) new book Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research (Harvard University Press) is coming out April 6. For more details.

…………

Luis Campos (University of New Mexico) has published a new book with the University of Chicago Press. Radium and the Secret of Life recovers a forgotten history of the connections between radioactivity and the life sciences in the early 20th century, highlighting how provocative metaphors linking radium and life ultimately led to key biological insights into the origin of life, the nature of heredity, and the nature and structure of the gene.

…………

Erik Conway (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory) published Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars (Johns Hopkins University Press) in early March 2015.

…………

Ruth Schwartz Cowan retired from the University of Pennsylvania in 2012. She is now engaged in a multi-year project (with Dan Kevles and Peter Westwick) to write the sesquicentennial history of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council. She is also preparing (with Matthew Hersch) a second, expanded edition of her textbook, A Social History of American Technology.

…………

Will Deringer, currently of the Columbia Society of Fellows in the Humanities, will begin a position as Assistant Professor in the Program in Science, Technology & Society at MIT this fall.

…………

Michael R. Dove and Daniel M. Kammen have published Science, Society, and Environment: Applying Physics and Anthropology to Sustainability. Abingdon (UK): Routledge, 2015. The book presents the results of a collaborative analysis by an anthropologist and a physicist of four key junctures among science, society, and the environment.

…………

Alice Dreger (Professor of Clinical Medical Humanities and Bioethics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University) has published Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science (Penguin Press, 2015).

…………

Robert Marc Friedman (Oslo) is writing a new play in connection with the hundredth anniversary of the general theory of relativity. “Transcendence” will open at The English Theater-Berlin/International Performing Arts Center in November, having received funding from the Berlin Hauptstadtkulturfonds. Initiative for the project came from Jürgen Renn (Max Planck Institute for History of Science), who is also collaborating on the project. Staged readings of a preliminary draft were to be held at the Baltimore meeting of the American Physical Society, 12 April and at the CUNY Grad Center program in science and the arts in New York on 14 April 2015 at 6:30 PM, Science Center, Room 4102, The Graduate Center of CUNY, 365 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan. Both events are open to the public.

…………

Anita Guerrini (Oregon State University) has been elected a Corresponding Member of the International Academy of the History of Science. Her book, The Courtiers’ Anatomists: Animals and Humans in Louis XIV’s Paris will be published in May by the University of Chicago Press.

…………

Cassandra Hatton has been named Director, History of Science & Technology, a department which she founded, at Bonhams auction house in New York. Bonhams had its inaugural history of science sale last fall, which was a huge success, and included the record-breaking sale of an Apple-1 computer for $905,000. Hatton has many exciting things in store for the department, one of which includes the sale of the recently discovered Alan Turing manuscript, which will take place on 13 April in New York.

…………

Joel Howell (Historian and Professor of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan) has co-authored an article with a cardiologist and musicologist titled “The Heartfelt Music of Ludwig van Beethoven” (Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, Volume 57, Number 2, Spring 2014, pp. 285-294) in which they argue that some of the rhythms in Beethoven’s music might be related to abnormal cardiac rhythms in his own body. The article has been featured on Science Daily, The Telegraph, and Huffington Post.

…………

The film based on the book Merchants of Doubt (by Naomi Oreskes, Harvard University, and Erik Conway, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory) was released in theaters in March 2015.

…………

Alisha Rankin (Assistant Professor of History, Tufts University) has been awarded a 2014-15 Charles A. Ryskamp and Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies to work on her book The Poison Trials: Antidotes and Experiment in Early Modern Europe.

…………

Joy Rankin will receive her PhD from Yale University in May 2015 and begin a tenure-track assistant professorship at Michigan State University in 2016, jointly appointed between Lyman Briggs College (in the History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science) and James Madison College (in Social Relations and Policy).

In addition to completing her dissertation, Personal Computing before Personal Computers, she has also been advising two documentary films on the history of computing. They are The Birth of BASIC, directed by Bob Drake ) and The Queen of Code directed by Gillian Jacobs.

She has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship as a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (in Cambridge, MA) for 2015-16, and will spend the year at the Academy working on her book manuscript before assuming her responsibilities at Michigan State.

…………

Naomi Rogers (Yale University) has been promoted to full Professor of the History of Medicine at Yale, where she teaches medical students and residents in the School of Medicine, and undergraduate and graduate students in the Program in the History of Science and Medicine, in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and in History. Her book Polio Wars: Sister Kenny and the Golden Age of American Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2014) has been awarded the 2014 Lavinia L. Dock Award by the American Association for the History of Nursing.

…………

Rachael Rosner (Independent Scholar) will spend the fall of 2015 as an Erikson Scholar at the Erikson Institute of the Austen Riggs Foundation to continue research on her book project, In Beck’s Basement.

…………

Anthony N. Stranges’ (Texas A&M University) book Technological Transformation of Gilded Age America, Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company, was published in 2014.

…………

Conevery Bolton Valencius is now Associate Professor in the Department of History at University of Massachusetts Boston, with affiliation also in the UMB School for the Environment. Her recent book The Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes (University of Chicago Press, 2013) came out in paperback in March 2015.

…………

Long-time HSS member George E. Webb will be retiring as Professor of History at Tennessee Tech University this summer. He hopes to pursue his many research projects and soon return to his native desert Southwest.

…………

Nadine Weidman (Harvard University and Boston College) has been appointed incoming editor of the journal History of Psychology. The journal welcomes submissions on all aspects of the psy-sciences, broadly construed, and on their interrelationships with the many contexts within which they have emerged and been practiced. Proposals for special issues are also welcome. For more information, see http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/HOP/index.aspx

…………

Dr. MeinelProfessor Dr. Christoph Meinel (University of Regensburg, Germany) is the recipient of the 2015 HIST Award of the Division of the History of Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. This award, which is the successor to the Dexter Award (1956-2001) and the Sydney M. Edelstein Award (2002-2009), will be presented at the American Chemical Society in Boston in August 2015. Dr. Meinel was born on November 28, 1949 in Dresden, Germany. He earned the qualification “Diplom-Chemiker” from the University of Marburg in 1974; all his subsequent historical work reflects his deep knowledge of the underlying chemistry. He continued his education at Marburg in the history of science and graduated in 1977 with a PhD. His doctoral dissertation was on the history of chemistry at Marburg, an extensive subject subsequently published as a major monograph.

He continued in the history of chemistry as a postdoctoral fellow with Maurice Crosland at the University of Kent at Canterbury, then returned to the University of Marburg, earning habilitation at the University of Hamburg in 1987. After a year as Fellow at the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study, he was appointed to a full professorship at the University of Regensburg in 1990, where he continued until his retirement in 2015. Christoph spent two periods in the United States, as a visiting professor at Smith College and as a research associate at the Center for the History of Chemistry (now a division of the Chemical Heritage Foundation) in Philadelphia.

Christoph Meinel is a member of the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina and a member of the Académie Internationale d’Histoire des Sciences in Paris. He has served as president of the German Society for the History of Science, and was the founding president of the International Commission on the History of Modern Chemistry. From 1990 through 1997 and again since 2014 he chairs the History Division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and is editor of the Division’s journal Mitteilungen.

Dr. Meinel’s extensive body of historical work has earned him a position at the center of the international community of historians of chemistry. His research interests include the emergence of chemistry as a discipline, its social history, communication and publication networks. He has also published on various aspects of early modern natural philosophy.

Such a rich career in the history of chemistry has been recognized by many honors: the Gmelin-Beilstein Memorial Medal of the German Chemical Society, the Alexandre Koyré Medal of the International Academy of the History of Science, and the Liebig-Wöhler Friendship Prize of the Göttingen Museum of Chemistry. The History Division of the American Chemical Society is honored to join the European societies in awarding Professor Meinel the HIST Prize.

Back to April 2015 Newsletter