Calling all historians of science – enter the 6th Notes and Records Essay Award

Are you a researcher in the history of science, technology and medicine?

Have you completed a postgraduate degree within the last five years?

If the answer to these questions is ‘yes’, you can enter our Essay Award for a chance to win £500 (or local currency equivalent) and publication of your winning essay in our history of science journal Notes and Records. One runner-up will also receive £250 and there will be £100 prizes for an additional three ‘honourable mentions’. All winning categories will benefit from a free online subscription to Notes and Records for one year. Deadline for entries is 28 February 2021.

Further information available at https://royalsocietypublishing.org/rsnr/essay-award

The Contemporary History Seminar Presents James Fleming’s “First Woman: Joanne Simpson and the Tropical Atmosphere”

Thursday, September 17, 4:00 pm

 

The 2020-2021 Contemporary History Seminar will begin on Thursday, September 17th on Zoom. The speaker will be:

James R. Fleming

Charles A. Dana Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, Colby College

Visiting Scholar, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University, 2020-21

First Woman:

Joanne Simpson and the Tropical Atmosphere

Clouds are the spark plugs in the heat engine of the tropical atmosphere, and heat from the tropics drives the planet’s general circulation. Atmospheric scientists didn’t know this in the 1950s, but Joanne Simpson, the first American woman to earn a Ph.D. in meteorology, did. Most histories of meteorology focus on polar and temperate regions and the accomplishments of male scientists. They marginalize or erase completely the contributions of female researchers. Joanne Simpson’s work on the tropical atmosphere did not fit this pattern. James Fleming’s new book, published by Oxford University Press, examines Simpson’s personal and professional life, her career prospects as a woman in science, and her relationship to the tropical atmosphere. These multifaceted and interacting textual streams constitute a braided narrative and form a complex dynamic system that displays surprising emergent properties. Is Joanne Simpson best remembered as a pioneer woman scientist who mentored a generation of meteorologists, and blazed a trail for other women to follow? Or was she simply the best tropical scientist of her generation? She was both.

For further information, please contact: Matt Shindell at 202-633-5897; ShindellM@si.edu

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Elizabeth Garber: In Memoriam

Elizabeth Anne Wolfe Garber (1939 – 2020)

Elizabeth Garber, Professor of History emerita at Stony Brook University, died at
home from the complications of Alzheimer’s Disease on 1 July 2020.

Liz grew up in London and graduated from Bedford College, University of
London, with a degree in physics. She came to the US to continue her studies at the
Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), moving to
the History of Science program from which she completed a PhD in 1966. While
studying and living in Cleveland she met and married Don Garber, who was
working on a PhD in physics. Their wedding took place just before she began to
write her dissertation and Don’s wedding present to her was a 3-month typewriter
rental. So, as she said, she just had to get it done on time. The idea that you
meet—or exceed—such expectations was typical of Liz’s approach to work.

In the late 1960s Don joined the Brookhaven National Laboratory and they moved
to Long Island, New York. Liz began teaching at SUNY-Stony Brook (now Stony
Brook University) first as an adjunct and later as a full faculty member. Her
interest in the history of the physical sciences was considered a surprise benefit for
Stony Brook’s strong programs in the sciences and engineering. When she came up
for tenure one of the referees noted that she knew “a lot about physics for an
historian.” Another early and unusual-seeming research field was the history of
meteorology; tenure referees were impressed by this and remarked on her work as
a font of information. Liz’s later interests in the history of mathematics and
mathematical physics led her to expand her research beyond history of physics and
thermodynamics into social and intellectual history of early modern Europe.

As a member of the Stony Brook faculty Liz taught an undergraduate survey of the
history of science and technology and more advanced undergraduate courses on the
history of the physical sciences and the social history of science. She served as
director of graduate studies and was the principal advisor to several Ph.Ds.
Liz was known to be a demanding teacher but one about whom few students
complained – her obvious commitment to the material she presented gave a sense
that “if she can do it, . . . I guess I can as well.” She would often announce to her
graduate classes that she would leave discussion to them . . . and then talk for the
full three hours of class time without notes and few pauses. You learned quickly
that there were no cigarette breaks in Liz’s classes.

Despite the role she cultivated as the crabby and frank semi-outsider on many
issues Liz was always a helpful and supportive colleague, especially to younger
faculty hired during her long watch. Liz was respected by her graduate students
and history of science colleagues as a no-nonsense and insightful editor. She had
famously stubborn attitudes toward technology—refusing for example to
memorize her social security number and writing early drafts longhand (the better
to cut and paste) but submitting what was essentially a typeset manuscript to her
publisher using an early version of LaTeX. The un-ergonomic characteristics of the
stairs to the History Department were another regular complaint.

Liz was as serious about her hobbies as she was about her work. She sewed and
knit many of her own clothes, the more complicated the better. As might be
expected she was drawn to projects that required mathematics to work out
patterning. She and Don were serious gardeners and their house in East Setauket
was always undergoing improvements. After Don retired from Brookhaven, he and
Liz became more active in such community projects such as greening the Stony
Brook campus and finding new uses for ageing strip malls. They were a fixture at
the classical music performances at the Stony Brook’s Staller Center for the Arts
and much of their social and community life was with non-academic friends. Trips
into New York for lectures, concerts, museum visits or meals—especially
meals—were regular before Liz’s retirement and became more so after that. Don’s
final illness coincided with her decline, but she was able to remain in the house
they loved until her own death in early July.

 

[This material was assembled by Sarah Lowengard and Joel Rosenthal: July 2020)

Humanities Without Walls

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 16 major research universities throughout the US Midwest and beyond.

In summer 2021, HWW is holding its first online, national, virtual summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Through a series of workshops, talks, and virtual field trips, participants will learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the nonprofit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields. All aspects of the workshop will be remote, virtual, and online in nature.

HWW invites applications from doctoral students pursuing degrees in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, virtual summer workshop.  Selection for the workshop includes a $5,000 fellowship.

This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this workshop and fellowship by their home institution and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university.

Full details of the program, including required application components, are available at: https://www.humanitieswithoutwalls.illinois.edu/initiatives/pre-doctoral/pre-doctoral-cfa.html

Propose a New Online Working Group

The Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine invites proposals for new online working groups focusing on specialized topics in the history of science, technology or medicine. This call is for groups that will meet between January 1 and December 31, 2021.

Working groups foster a collegial and stimulating environment for scholars at all levels from around the world to work together in small groups, discussing works-in-progress and other literature of interest. Groups are hosted through the Consortium’s website. Participation will be promoted among the Consortium’s members, fellows and larger community. Individuals or groups can participate from anywhere via video conference.

Proposals should:

  1. Describe the scope and purpose of the proposed working group
  2. Include brief biographical statements from two or three scholars who will serve as conveners
  3. Include a preliminary list of topics or titles for seven to twelve meetings
  4. Identify at least eight scholars committed to attending meetings
  5. Include a plan for promotion of the working group to relevant scholars
  6. Indicate how the proposed group complements, overlaps with, or is distinct from, other currently active or past working groups

We encourage proposals with a mix of conveners at different levels of seniority. Renewal of successful groups will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Applications are due no later than November 15, 2020.

Propose a working group

Contact info@chstm.org with any questions regarding working groups.

CFP: Association for East Asian Environmental History Sixth Biennial Conference, Kyoto University, 7-10 September 2021

The Association for East Asian Environmental History (AEAEH) is now accepting proposals for organized panels and individual papers for its Sixth Biennial Conference to be held September 7-10, 2021, at Kyoto University. The general theme of the conference is “Humans and Nature in East Asia: Exploring New Directions in Environmental History.” Panels and individual papers may explore the general theme or any aspect of East Asian environmental history, including the following sub-themes of the conference:

• Energy
• Pollution
• Oceans
• Lakes and Rivers
• Forests
• Food and Agriculture
• Disease
• Art and Philosophy
• Historiography

The deadline for submitting paper and panel proposals is November 30, 2020. For complete information about the conference and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit the website for EAEH 2021.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the organizers of EAEH 2021 are carefully monitoring the current situation. They hope it will be possible for scholars from around the world to meet safely in Kyoto in September 2021. But various alternatives to the conference, including a virtual meeting, are also under consideration. Please check the conference webpage for updates about the planned format of the conference. Relevant information will also be sent to AEAEH members by email.

The Association for East Asian Environmental History was founded in 2009 to promote cooperation among scholars working on any aspect of environmental history in East Asia. The association welcomes new members and encourages a wide variety of approaches to the study of environmental history, including interdisciplinary, transnational, and comparative approaches. To learn more about the AEAEH, visit its website.

Looking for your suggestions for broadening the resource pages of SHOT to include texts on anti-racism, anticolonialism and diversity.

A volunteer group of SHOT (Society for the History of Technology) members is gathering ideas for a revised “Classic Works in the History of Technology” page on the society’s website. During this time of increased awareness of racism and white supremacy in historical scholarship, our group has gathered to address major gaps in the history of technology and related fields. The goal is to reorient notions of what counts as a “classic” to encompass texts that are anti-racist, anti-colonial, and inclusive in sentiment expressly.

We aim to create a list of sources across geographies, time periods, and sub-disciplines that will help graduate students in the history of technology prepare for doctoral exams. We are reaching out to solicit recommendations for this list. If you have suggestions for sources that you would recommend to a graduate student preparing for exams in your field, please fill out this form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfC3zvFbhx59RyHzxLFo4aq0CfaipQ-exOhzhji7bw7kXQFOQ/viewform, and limit the list to five sources. Primary source works, articles or other shorter pieces, and other media (films/documentaries, audio, etc) are also welcome in addition to monographs or collections in the field. Alternatively, you can e-mail your ideas to our group at shotbibliography@gmail.com.

Please enter your top five sources in the form by September 16. If the book or article title is not in English, please provide an English translation in square brackets after the non-English title.

We will compile a list of sources after receiving everyone’s suggestions. We aim to add this new page to the SHOT website around the time of the annual meeting. We are also considering adding future bibliographies on the SHOT website with the aim of making them more inclusive.

Thanks in advance for contributing and helping the next generation of scholars.

Sincerely,

Donna J. Drucker, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Charnell Chasten Long, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Alana Staiti, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian

Bess Williamson, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Geoff Zylstra, New York City College of Technology

Anna Åberg, Chalmers University of Technology

Vectors of the U.S.A.- Webinar Series Starting 9/22

An invitation from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum: Disease Vectors in the US

I am writing to share details of our upcoming webinar series, Disease Vectors of the U.S.A. In addition to remaining vigilant about preventing the spread of COVID-19, we must also remain aware of the diseases spread by mosquitoes and ticks as we and our pets take in the outdoors this summer. West Nile, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, Lyme and heartworm are just a few of the diseases that we and our pets risk contracting when seeking safe outdoor activities. Join us for this two-part series to hear what experts have to say about the hidden lives of mosquitoes and ticks and how to protect yourself, your family, and your pets against mosquito- and tick-borne illnesses.

For further information contact:

Ashley Peery, PhD

Outbreak Educator

Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum

AAHM Updates: 2021 Call for Papers and Resources

Three updates from AAHM:

 

1. The submission system for the 2021 Call for Papers is open!  Consider submitting an abstract for the 2021 meeting. The deadline for submissions is September 30th. For additional details and to submit an abstract go here: https://www.histmed.org/cfp2021 

2.  The American Historical Association has launched the Bibliography of Historians Responses to COVID-19. Many of you contributed to this bibliography.  AHA is still accepting submissions here: https://www.historians.org/news-and-advocacy/everything-has-a-history/a-bibliography-of-historians-responses-to-covid-19

AAHM members can connect to these resources from the website on the COVID 19 Resources page or the History of Medicine Resources page  

AHA has also launched Remote Teaching Resources to help our members and colleagues with the challenges of being a historian, and a history teacher, in a virtual environment. This ongoing project compiles materials and tools to aid historians in developing courses and teaching remotely in online and hybrid environments, providing a central location where instructors can access high-quality materials that meet professional standards. All resources are vetted by a team of historians at the AHA. Remote Teaching Resources is part of “Confronting a Pandemic: Historians and COVID-19,” which has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, using funding from the CARES Act. [Many AAHM members contributed to this.]

How to Use: Simply visit the site and find the resource you need. Remote Teaching Resources includes accessibility guides, pedagogy resources, and materials specific to a range of places, eras, topics, and fields. Resources are available in a wide range of formats, including filmed lectures, podcasts, short videos, lesson plans, syllabi, assignments, primary sources with discussion questions, online museum exhibits, maps, and a wide range of digital history projects useful for instruction.

How to Submit: To maximize the number and range of resources available prior to the fall semester, the AHA encourages historians to submit teaching materials to the project using this form. No contribution is too small. New resources will be uploaded weekly through December 31, 2020. We encourage you to use these resources in your classes and to share them with colleagues. Please share the call for submissions with colleagues as well – we would be grateful for any materials they can contribute.

 

3. Antoine Johnson, Chair of the AAHM Committee on Student Affairs and other contributors have compiled an excellent resource on the history of anti-black racism in medicine. Syllabus: A History of Anti-Racism in Medicine is available here and is linked from the AAHM website on the History of Medicine Resources page

 

Remote Teaching Resources for Historians

The American Historical Association has launched Remote Teaching Resources to help our members and colleagues with the challenges of being a historian, and a history teacher, in a virtual environment. This ongoing project compiles materials and tools to aid historians in developing courses and teaching remotely in online and hybrid environments, providing a central location where instructors can access high-quality materials that meet professional standards. All resources are vetted by a team of historians at the AHA. Remote Teaching Resources is part of “Confronting a Pandemic: Historians and COVID-19,” which has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, using funding from the CARES Act.

How to Use

Simply visit the site and find the resource you need. Remote Teaching Resources includes accessibility guides, pedagogy resources, and materials specific to a range of places, eras, topics, and fields. Resources are available in a wide range of formats, including filmed lectures, podcasts, short videos, lesson plans, syllabi, assignments, primary sources with discussion questions, online museum exhibits, maps, and a wide range of digital history projects useful for instruction.

 

How to Submit

To maximize the number and range of resources available prior to the fall semester, the AHA encourages historians to submit teaching materials to the project using this form. No contribution is too small. New resources will be uploaded weekly through December 31, 2020.

We encourage you to use these resources in your classes and to share them with colleagues. Please share the call for submissions with colleagues as well – we would be grateful for any materials they can contribute.

For further information:

Sarah Weicksel

Research Coordinator

American Historical Association