American Historical Association Call for Podcasts

The Remedial Herstory Project is calling for proposals on women’s history for our 2021-2022 podcast season. Our podcast is targeted at K-12 educators to give them the tools to get women’s history into their classes. If you have content that you think should be a staple in the curriculum, we would love to learn about it. We have identified several themes for the upcoming season and are specifically seeking topics that meet one of these themes.

  • Women and Landmark Laws and Cases
  • Empresses, Monarchs, and Politicians
  • Women in Social Reform
  • Women in Business and Science
  • Women and War Queer Women in History
  • Women Explorers and Pioneers

You can apply to be a speaker on our website at Apply to Speak.

Applications now open for The Archive: Theory, Form, Practice

Applications are due August 30, 2021 
Apply Now
The Archive: Theory, Form, Practice

Fridays, February 11 – April 8, 2022

The Newberry Library invites graduate students in the humanities to apply for a seminar that will explore the theoretical, critical, and practical methods necessary to negotiate historical and literary archives. The seminar will be held on eight Fridays from February 11 –  April 8, 2022 (with no meeting on Feb. 25). The course will be led by Liesl Olson (Director of Chicago Studies, Newberry Library) and a team of Newberry archivists and curators, including Alison Hinderliter and Catherine Grandgeorge. The seminar will include guest presentations by visiting faculty.

The seminar will provide graduate students with a set of tools essential to doctoral research in any archive. Students will acquire skills that will also broaden their opportunities for career diversity by exposing students to archival work at an independent research library.

The course is ideal for PhD candidates in or beyond their third year of doctoral studies. A cohort of 18 graduate students will be selected to participate. Each participant will receive a $500 award, and lunch will be provided each session. Travel funding for students outside of the Chicago area is also available.

Applicants will be notified on September 15, 2022. For more information, including how to apply, visit: https://archiveformtheorypractice.com/

This seminar is part of a larger initiative which will culminate May 5 – 6, 2022 with a symposium at the Newberry that will bring together seminar faculty, students, invited archival specialists, humanities scholars, and directors of graduate study to make public a larger discussion of how to integrate archival practice more fully into doctoral programs in the humanities

Support for this seminar was provided by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

History of Computing curator position open

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is seeking to hire a new curator of the history of computing (see below for details). Applications will be accepted until July 27, 2021.

Please follow the links below for more details. And please share this announcement with anyone you think would be interested in putting in an application.

 

Please note that there are two listings:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/606618800 – for current and former federal employees

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/606854200 – for the public

 

Summary

 

The Smithsonian Institution (SI) is a diverse museum and research complex dedicated to the increase and diffusion of knowledge. The National Air and Space Museum department of Space History embraces topics such as rockets, spacecraft, and other technologies.

The incumbent curates the department’s collection and exhibits with a focus on the history of computing with an emphasis on its role in spaceflight.

This position is OUTSIDE bargaining unit.

Responsibilities

 

Duties of the GS-11 and GS-12 are the same.  At the GS-11 level there is closer supervision of the work completed.

  • Conduct independent technical research on the history of computing, including design, technology, culture, and historical significance resulting in publications in peer-reviewed journals or books
  • Serve as a curator to include managing and interpreting artifacts associated with the history of computing, including design, technology, culture, and historical significance.
  • Develop exhibits, especially as related to the history of computing, including design, technology, culture, and historical significance.
  • Prepare technical reports in writing as well as oral presentations to the staff and public and digital outreach on the Museum and its collection.
  • Foster relationships across the organization to enhance attention to the history of computing, including design, technology, culture, and historical significance.

Call for Submissions – Sigma Xi Annual Meeting and Student Research Conference

Sigma Xi Annual Meeting and Student Research Conference

Roots to Fruits: Responsible Research for a Flourishing Humanity
How scientific virtues serve society

November 4 –7, 2021
Niagara Falls, New York
(Hybrid Event)
Submission Deadline: July 30, 2021

Contribute to the dialogue on scientific integrity and responsible research by presenting a session at this year’s conference. We invite you to submit symposia proposals as well as abstracts for workshops, panel discussions, and research presentations. The conference is an international forum for researchers, ethicists, educators, and science communicators to examine what it means to be a responsible researcher across science and engineering disciplines. The submission deadline is Friday, July 30, 2021. To learn more about this Call for Submissions, visit www.sigmaxi.org/2021submissions. If you have any questions, please contact the meeting organizers: meetings@sigmaxi.org.

CHSTM: Call for Papers for 2021-22 Working Groups

Call for Papers
for 2021-22 Working Groups
Otto Lummer (1860-1925), at Breslau on his 60th Birthday
Image courtesy of the American Philosophical Society
The Consortium’s working groups bring together scholars from around the world to share their works in progress on specialized topics in the history of science, technology and medicine. All interested scholars are welcome. We invite paper proposals for the 2021-22 academic year in the following working groups:

Scholars interested in sharing a draft article, dissertation chapter or book chapter for discussion should submit, as a single PDF, a proposal of no more than 1000 words including:

  • a description of the paper
  • what you hope to gain from discussion with the group
  • relevant biographical information
Proposals may be submitted by July 15, 2021 at:
https://www.chstm.org/wgpaper

New issue, HoST — Journal of History of Science and Technology (15.1, June 2021)

HoST — Journal of History of Science and Technology is a peer-reviewed open access journal, published online in English by De Gruyter/Sciendo and results of a partnership between four Portuguese research units (CIUHCT, CIDEHUS, ICS e IHC).

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 15.1
Special issue “Global Flora: Mastering Exotic Plants (Eighteenth—Nineteenth Centuries)”
This special issue includes an introduction by the guest editors Lorelai Kury and Sara Albuquerque followed by three articles that contribute to an analysis of plant circulation from the viewpoint of the science and techniques that sought to use or examine exotic species, particularly within the European circuit.
• “Introduction: Global Flora: Mastering Exotic Plants (Eighteenth—Nineteenth Centuries)”, Lorelai Kury and Sara Albuquerque
• “Knowledge and Circulation of Plants: Unveiling the Participation of Amazonian Indigenous Peoples in the Construction of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Botany,” Nelson Sanjad, Ermelinda Pataca, and Rafael Santos
• “Global Affinities: The Natural Method and Anomalous Plants in the Nineteenth Century,” Lorelai Kury and Sara Albuquerque
• “The National Sericultural Utopia and Debates on the Acclimatization of Plants in New-born Belgium (1830-1865),” Denis Diagre-Vanderpelen

Additional article to the special issue published in HoST 14.2 “The Fabulous 1930s in the History of Science and Technology”
• “The 1931 London Congress: The Rise of British Marxism and the Interdependencies of Society, Nature and Technology,” Gerardo Ienna and Giulia Rispoli

An article in the newly created Varia section
• “The Social Construction of the “Non-professional Computer Users”: the “Center for the Popularization of Informatics” in Catalonia, Spain (1980s-1990s),” Ignasi Meda-Calvet

In this number you can also find three Book Reviews
• “Book Review: Michael Rossi. The Republic of Color: Science, Perception, and the Making of Modern America,” Clemens Finkelstein
• “Book Review: Hartmut Petzold. Eine Berliner Waage im Münchner Deutschen Museum,” Agnes Bauer
• “Book Review: Seb Falk. The Light Ages: A Medieval Journey of Discovery,” Nicholas A. Jacobson

HPS&ST June Newsletter

Dear Colleague,

The June HPS&ST Newsletter is on the web at:

https://www.hpsst.com/hpsst-newsletter.html

Contents

# Introduction

# Michael R. Matthews: History, Philosophy and Science Teaching: A Personal Story, Springer, 2021

# Paul Bunge Prize 2022

# German Society for Philosophy of Science, Fourth International Conference, Berlin March 2022

# Philosophy of Science Association (PSA) Covid Teaching Resources

# Assistant Editor Required, HPS&ST Newsletter

# Opinion Page: Where Science and Miracles Meet, Alan Lightman, MIT

# Recent HPS&ST Research Articles

# Recent HPS&ST Related Books

# Coming HPS&ST Related Conferences

# HPS&ST Related Organisations and Websites

The first-listed item is my own just-published academic autobiography.  The book’s Preface and TOC can be read at:

https://www.hpsst.com/uploads/6/2/9/3/62931075/personal_story_front_matter.pdf

Book details, chapter titles, previews, and purchasing information can be seen at:

https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811605574?token=xRMtG7SJe4B2Ddd

Hopefully there are some useful lessons that teachers and researchers can draw from my account of forty years of writing, editorial and administrative work in HPS&ST.

Do please excuse a personal note, but the link below is to a brief one-minute clip made today by my 10-year-old grandson, Joshua, with support from his near 3-year-old brother, Hugo, as part of a local Minnamurra (Australia) environmental campaign with which he is involved.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gczYCUuoLLs

A nice example of young children’s appreciation of immediate environmental issues.  An appreciation that surely can be built upon in a science programme and extended to less immediate environmental and related social and political issues.

The Table of Contents and web-link of the HPS&ST Newsletter is sent monthly to about 9,500 individuals who directly or indirectly have an interest in the connections of history and philosophy of science with theoretical, curricular and pedagogical issues in science teaching, and/or interests in the promotion of more engaging and effective teaching of the history and philosophy of science.  The newsletter is readable and downloadable from the website above.

The newsletter is also sent to different HPS lists and to science education lists.

The newsletter seeks to serve the diverse international community of HPS&ST scholars and teachers by disseminating information about events and publications that connect to HPS&ST concerns.

Please do feel free to forward this email to any local, national or international lists whose members you think would appreciate knowing of the newsletter and its web location.  Forwarding the notification email is a very easy and efficient way of multiplying the readership and so increasing awareness of HPS&ST matters.

Contributions to the newsletter (publications, thematic issues, conferences, Opinion Page, etc.) are welcome and should be sent direct to the editor:

Michael R. Matthews, UNSW, m.matthews@unsw.edu.au .

If you wish to unsubscribe from this email list, simply click the UNSUBSCRIBE link in the footer of this email.

Alternatively, if you have friends, colleagues or students who would like to subscribe to the list, tell them to send a message SUBSCRIBE message to: m.matthews@unsw.edu.au

CHSTM: Call for Papers for 2021-22 Working Groups

Call for Papers
for 2021-22 Working Groups
Otto Lummer (1860-1925), at Breslau on his 60th Birthday
Image courtesy of the American Philosophical Society
The Consortium’s working groups bring together scholars from around the world to share their works in progress on specialized topics in the history of science, technology and medicine. All interested scholars are welcome. We invite paper proposals for the 2021-22 academic year in the following working groups:

Scholars interested in sharing a draft article, dissertation chapter or book chapter for discussion should submit, as a single PDF, a proposal of no more than 1000 words including:

  • a description of the paper
  • what you hope to gain from discussion with the group
  • relevant biographical information
Proposals may be submitted by July 15, 2021 at:
https://www.chstm.org/wgpaper

Hagley Conference CFP Deadline July 1st/Reach Out and Touch Someone

Reach Out and Touch Someone:

A Conference on Commercial Intimacy and Personalization

Thursday and Friday, November 4 and 5, 2021

Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society

Hagley Library, Wilmington, Delaware

 

In today’s wired world, marketers have heralded their ability to use apps, social media, and other online spaces to forge relationships with consumers that feel truly personal. Such claims, however, are not new.

Marketplace transactions have long been mediated by forms of commercial intimacy that blur the line between the putatively public, rational world of commerce and the private, emotional realm of personal relations. From the warm handshake to the sentiment-laden ad campaign, business interests of all sorts – producers, service providers, distributors, retailers and others – have found ways to soften the profit motive’s harder edges by enveloping it with an aura of affinity. Over time, these tools of “goodwill” became even more crucial as markets expanded to include farther-flung buyers and sellers dealing in new and unfamiliar wares.

This conference will explore the broad theme of commercial intimacy from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century. We are particularly interested in scholarship that explores how intimacy worked, the technologies behind it, and the interplay between the business and the personal. What were the technologies behind industrialized forms of intimacy? How did commercial entities appropriate tools of intimacy to sell? How might the history of emotions change our understanding of advertising and persuasion? In turn, how did the terms of commercial intimacy influence interpersonal relationships outside of the realms of sales and marketing? Why do personal appeals work even among consumers who know they are being manipulated emotionally?

We are interested in original, unpublished, and historically-informed papers addressing the above and related topics, from the mid-1800s to the recent past and centered in the US, written from a range of disciplinary viewpoints, including but not limited to: history; communication; media studies; psychology; sociology; geography; advertising; marketing; graphic design; printing and publishing; and information studies. We especially encourage proposals that engage with the following themes, but are open to any work that falls within this call:

• the dynamics of face-to-face selling, including peddling, door-to-door sales, in-home product demonstrations, house parties, and promotional seminars. How do sellers establish intimacy with buyers in these varied settings and what varied forms does this intimacy take?

• the technologies of personalized solicitations, including direct mail, telemarketing, spam, mailing lists, databases, and other networked and mediated forms of individualized inquiry.  What kinds of affective appeals—including the apparent lack of affect—are at work in these different attempts to reach out to potential customers?  How do these forms of communication imagine or frame the individuals they address?

• the use of particular mediums, techniques, and genres through which commercial intimacy is performed, including the voice, body language, dress, manners, rhetorical styles, penmanship, and other forms of self-presentation.  What are the affective aesthetics of different forms and genres of address and how do these map onto assumptions about identity, politics, or ideology?

• the emotional appeal of early celebrity “influencers,” endorsers, and spokespeople; approachable and humanized “brand ambassadors.”  What does the association with a particular celebrity mean for a given product brand and how does this frame the consumers that the brand targets?

• the psychology behind ad slogans and promotional copy fostering personal relationships and/or loyalty.  What is going on, or presumed to be going on, when consumers see themselves in or otherwise “buy into” a given brand identity?

• the practice of gift-giving in the commercial context, including greeting cards, business gifts, retail premiums, customer loyalty and rewards programs.  What are the affective dimensions of such “loyalty” as framed within these exchange relations?

• the creation of community and identity within sales forces, buying clubs, and multi-level marketing enterprises.  How might sales people come to see themselves as part of a larger affective community and what does this mean for the practice of selling a given product or brand identity?

Please submit proposals of no more than 500 words and a one-page C.V. to Carol Lockman at https://www.hagley.org/2021-fall-conference-abstract-submission by July 1, 2021. Conference presenters will be asked to submit complete versions of their conference papers by Oct. 15, 2021. The conference is planned as an in-person event but will adopt a virtual format if necessary. Presenters will receive lodging in the conference hotel and compensation for their travel costs. The conference organizers are planning an edited volume based on a selection of revised conference papers. The program committee is comprised of Brent Malin, University of Pittsburgh, Richard Popp, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Wendy Woloson, Rutgers University-Camden; Roger Horowitz and Erik Rau, Hagley Library.

PhD position- Drawing to learn in science

PhD position in Drawing to learn in science

A PhD position is available at the Department of Teacher education at NTNU. This is an educational position that shall provide promising research recruits the opportunity for professional development through studies towards a PhD. The position is connected to the PhD-program in Educational Science at the faculty of Social and Educational Science and the faculty will be your employer.

The position is connected to the ScienceHumanities research group coordinated from the Natural science section at the Department. The research group applies perspectives from the humanities and the social sciences to the study of natural science (including science in school) as a discipline and cultural practice, past and present. Studies of cultures of text and (re)presentation of science, how the Nature of Science is taught in the classroom, students’ understanding of science, and practical experiments in science teaching are included in this. For more information, see https://www.ntnu.edu/ilu/sciencehumanities.

We are looking for a highly motivated candidate to participate in a research endeavor focusing on Drawing to Learn in Science. We are interested in how drawing supports learning-to-think in science, and also how it can engage creativity for science learning.

Drawing to explore, model, represent and communicate scientific understanding and reasoning is inherent to scientific practice. The practice of drawing is intertwined with the history and nature of science in terms of how scientific knowledge is, and has been, produced and justified. When it comes to student learning, drawing has been shown to contribute to observation skill, enhanced recall, to make understanding explicit and to organize knowledge effectively, leading to deep learning. However, there is a lack of studies of how and why teachers include drawing activities in the science classrooms and how student engage in drawing as a science practice. Other relevant questions to ask are what knowledge and skills teachers need in order to make use of Drawing to Learn in Science in their classrooms, and how such knowledge and skills can be developed through pre- and in-service training.

We invite applicants to submit a research proposal within the theme Drawing to Learn in Science and linked to the ScienceHumanities research group. We are open to different scientific approaches to the topic and different educational contexts.

For more information, see the job advert: PhD candidate in Drawing to Learn in Science (207694) | NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology (jobbnorge.no)

If you have any questions about the position, please contact please contact project leader, Associate professor
Helena Bichão (+47 73412848 / +47 91527735 Helena.bichao@ntnu.no), chair of the
ScienceHumanities research group, Professor Annette Lykknes (+47 73590496 / +47 48031517,
annette.lykknes@ntnu.no) or head of the science section at Department of Teacher Education
John Magne Grindeland (+47 73559877 / +47 97180375, john.m.grindeland@ntnu.no).