Announcement: Symposium on “Global Visions on Cities and Historical Pandemics in the 20th Century” (July 24, 2020)

by Mohammad Gharipour

Epidemic Urbanism Initiative (EUI), founded by Drs. Mohammad Gharipour and Caitlin DeClercq, presents “Global Visions on Cities and Historical Pandemics in the 20th Century.” This symposium is being organized as part of GAHTC’s annual event and will be held 1-3pm US Eastern Time on Friday, July 24, 2020. The following conversations comprising this event will be moderated by Dr. Mehreen Chida-Razvi (Nasser Khalili Collections, London) and Dr. Fariba Zarinebaf (Uni. of California, Riverside).

 

Panel 1: Colonialism, Imperialism, and Urbanism

  1. French Colonialism, the City, and Pandemics in Vietnam, 1885-1930s (Michael Vann, Sacramento State Uni.)
  2. The Hong Kong Plague and the Park Movement of the British Settlements in Shanghai and Tianjin, China, 1894 (Yichi Zhang, Uni. of Oslo, Norway)
  3. Bubonic Plague, Homes, and the Battles Over Segregation in Urban Senegal, 1914-1921 (Gregory Valdespino, Uni. of Chicago)

Panel 2: Politics, Policies, and Public Health

  1. State, Epidemics, and Ecology in East Bengal, 1858-1947 (Mohammad Hussain, Ibn Haldun Uni, Turkey)
  2. The Regulation of Quarantine Spaces in Brazil after 1873 Health Convention (Niuxa Dias Drago, Ana Paula Polizzo, and Fernando Delgado, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
  3. Print, Politics, and Smallpox Epidemic in Terre Haute, Indiana, 1902-1903 (Allen Shotwell, Ivy Tech College)
  4. Urban Transformation and Public Health Policies in Post-influenza Lagos, 1918 (Timothy Oluseyi Odeyale, Uni. of Ibadan, Nigeria)

Panel 3: Community and Domestic Space

  1. The City as Field Hospital and the Influenza Epidemic in Seattle, 1918-1919 (Louisa Iarocci, University of Washington, Seattle)
  2. Building a Community in Leprosy Island in the Philippines, 1889-1941 (Mary Anne Akers, Morgan State Uni.)
  3. Epidemics between Dwelling and Building in 1950s Baghdad (Huma Gupta, MIT)
  4. House, Social Life, and Smallpox in Kathmandu, 1963 (Susan Heydon, Uni. of Otago, New Zealand)

Please register for this symposium, “Global Visions on Cities and Historical Pandemics in the 20th Century,” at the following link

 

If you have any questions, please contact us at epidemicurbanism@gmail.com.  Please also see videos from our past events and conversations on our  YouTube Channel.

Pandemic Histories Roundtable: “Public(s) and their Health”

by Christopher Calesso

The fourth roundtable in The Canadian Society for the History of Medicine’s Pandemic Histories virtual seminar series will be on July 23 at 4:00 p.m. EST.

Please join us for “Public(s) and their Health” featuring Mitchell Hammond, James Hanley and Sarah Wallace.

Registration available through Zoom: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9rHZUCogThS0gaozVULQgw

What defines the public(s) in ‘public health’? Three historians explore the relationship between public health and the community since the 19th century. Modern public health generated legal frameworks that defined social inclusion and exclusion in new ways, and shifted the boundaries between public and private. How were ideas like germ theory, and notions of healthy citizenship communicated, and received? Successful public health campaigns against infectious diseases also played a key role in shaping public opinion.

Mitchell Hammond teaches European history and the history of medicine at the University of Victoria. His book Epidemics and the Modern World was published in January with the University of Toronto Press.

James Hanley teaches the history of science and medicine at the University of Winnipeg. His research focuses on 19th century public health in Britain.

Sarah Wallace is the RCMP’s Historian in Ottawa, but in recent years has taught the History of Public Health at Trent University. Her research focuses on the relationship between pandemics and North America’s immigration policies.

Three New Podcasts: Perspectives on the COVID-19 Pandemic

This series of discussions by scholars in the humanities and social sciences raises questions and explores perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic.

New Episodes:

  • Kavita Sivaramakrishnan reflects on public engagement, political history, and the COVID-19 crisis in India.
  • Marcos Cueto discusses the COVID-19 crisis in Brazil.
  • Mary Augusta Brazelton talks about the COVID-19 crisis along with the history of public health and modernization in China.

Metropolitan Museum Journal: Call for Submissions

he Editorial Board invites submissions of original research on works of art in the Museum’s collection.

The Journal publishes Articles and Research Notes. All texts must take works of art in the collection as the point of departure. Articles contribute extensive and thoroughly argued scholarship, whereas research notes are often smaller in scope, focusing on a specific aspect of new research or presenting a significant finding from technical analysis. The maximum length for articles is 8,000 words (including endnotes) and 10–12 images, and for research notes 4,000 words with 4–6 images.

The process of peer review is double-blind. Manuscripts are reviewed by the Journal Editorial Board, composed of members of the curatorial, conserva­tion, and scientific departments, as well as external scholars.

Articles and Research Notes in the Journal appear both in print and online, and are accessible via MetPublications and the Journal‘s home page on the University of Chicago Press website.

Some members may have visited the Making Marvels exhibit earlier this year: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/making-marvels-science-splendor. The Met has a large Scientific Research department that works closely with its Conservation departments. Scientists and conservators publish new findings in the Journal.

https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/conservation-and-scientific-research/scientific-research

 

The deadline for submissions for Volume 56 (2021) is September 15, 2020.

 

Submission guidelines: www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/met/instruct

 

Please send materials to: journalsubmissions@metmuseum.org

 

Inspiration from the Collectionwww.metmuseum.org/art/collection

View the Journalhttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/loi/met

Metropolitan Museum Journal: Call for Submissions

The Editorial Board invites submissions of original research on works of art in the Museum’s collection.

The Journal publishes Articles and Research Notes. All texts must take works of art in the collection as the point of departure. Articles contribute extensive and thoroughly argued scholarship, whereas research notes are often smaller in scope, focusing on a specific aspect of new research or presenting a significant finding from technical analysis. The maximum length for articles is 8,000 words (including endnotes) and 10–12 images, and for research notes 4,000 words with 4–6 images.

The process of peer review is double-blind. Manuscripts are reviewed by the Journal Editorial Board, composed of members of the curatorial, conserva­tion, and scientific departments, as well as external scholars.

Articles and Research Notes in the Journal appear both in print and online, and are accessible via MetPublications and the Journal‘s home page on the University of Chicago Press website.

Some members may have visited the Making Marvels exhibit earlier this year: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/making-marvels-science-splendor. The Met has a large Scientific Research department that works closely with its Conservation departments. Scientists and conservators publish new findings in the Journal.

https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/conservation-and-scientific-research/scientific-research

 

The deadline for submissions for Volume 56 (2021) is September 15, 2020.

 

Submission guidelines: www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/met/instruct

 

Please send materials to: journalsubmissions@metmuseum.org

 

Inspiration from the Collectionwww.metmuseum.org/art/collection

View the Journalhttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/loi/met

Remote Interviewing in the COVID-19 Era

Presented by SOHA: Southwest Oral History Association
July 31st, 9:30am (PST) on Zoom

Considering doing oral history while in quarantine? Join us to discuss our experiences conducting and processing interviews online during the COVID-19 pandemic. Come prepared to share! This workshop will include a robust dialogue of concerns, benefits, and potentially useful technologies when it comes to remote interviewing.

Speakers: Dr. Caryll Batt-Dziedziak (Interim Director, Women’s Research Institute of Nevada) and Dr. Summer Cherland (Founder, South Phoenix Oral History Project)

Moderator: Jennifer Keil, SOHA President

This is a free workshop. We encourage you to consider donating a small amount or joining our nonprofit organization.

Please RSVP here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1VB_FMoJBauS-bGCV0sOByrDP_SUc2NL1-DEfdHr6QUE/viewform?edit_requested=true

Contact Info:

Summer Cherland, PhD

History Faculty, South Mountain Community College
Founder, South Phoenix Oral History Project
2nd Vice President, Southwest Oral History Association

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for Literature Today (September 2020 issue), Issue theme “PANDEMIC”

by Dr. Pradeep Chaswal

Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.

Type:
Call for Publications
Date:
July 7, 2020 to September 20, 2020
Subject Fields:
Humanities, Languages, Literature, Public Health, Theatre & Performance History / Studies

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS (September 2020 issue),  Issue theme “PANDEMIC”

We are inviting submissions for September 2020 issue of ‘Literature Today’. The theme of our September 2020 issue is ‘Pandemic’. You can send us poems, short stories, memoirs and one act plays on :

1. Survival in pandemic.

2. Survival in society .

3. Survival in post Covid-19.

4. Emotions in the times of pandemic.

5. Relationships in the times of pandemic.

6 Faith in the times of pandemic.

7. Humanity and pandemic.

8. Animals in pandemic .

9. Nature in the times of pandemic.

10. Any other relevant topic which explores the theme of ‘Pandemic’.

Submission Deadline: September 20, 2020

Submission Guidelines:
1. Send not more than 4 poems.
2. Send not more than 2 short stories/2 one act plays/ 2 memoirs.
3. Work submitted for publication must be original.
4. Simultaneous submissions are also welcome.
5.Please send all submissions to editorliteraturetoday@gmail.com
6. Please send a cover letter and short Bio-data, (Maximum 100 words) in third person narrative, with your submission.

Submission Deadline: September 20, 2020
For other details please visit:
https://literaturetodayjournal.blogspot.com/

PLEASE SHARE THIS CALL FOR SUBMISSION

COVID-19 and Asian Medicine Webinar

by Michael Stanley-Baker

The International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM: http://iastam.org/) will be hosting a series of webinars with the overall title:

The ‘pan’ of pandemics: why and how do Asian approaches matter?

The first webinar will take place on Wednesday, July 8th 2020, 3:00PM Central European time (London 2:00PM, New Delhi 6:30PM, Beijing 9:00PM, New York 9:00AM)

 

COVID19 has articulated our connectivity, whilst also reminding us that we ought to look forward to an epistemic space where plurality is normal, and not disruptive.

Where does the study of Asian medicine sit within these understandings?

How can we begin to make sense of encounters between medical histories? Between different medical epistemologies? What can history teach us about current challenges?

Join us for an inter-disciplinary discussion with:

Prof. Monica H. Green (Arizona State University): Historical Contours of the Medieval Afro-Eurasian Disease Landscape: New Findings from Genetics and Medical History

Prof. Volker Scheid (London): Some Moments in the Encounter between Chinese Medicine and Covid-19

Prof. A. David Napier (UCL, London): Sick Societies and the Flow of Life

Introduction: Prof. Dr. Angelika C. Messner (IASTAM President, Kiel University)

Moderator: Dr Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (Goldsmith, University of London)

 

Link: https://uni-kiel.zoom.us/j/97252014788?pwd=OG5vMitZM21GSVpwNThkWm9VOWsrdz09

Meeting ID: 995 1959 3248

Password: 958586

 

Abstracts:

Prof. Monica H. Green (Arizona State University):

Historical Contours of the Medieval Afro-Eurasian Disease Landscape: New Findings from Genetics and Medical History

Recent developments in genetics have given a new resolution to long-standing questions about the origins and dissemination histories of the world’s major infectious diseases. This brief presentation will summarize what is now known about seven diseases that originated in Afro-Eurasia: plague, leprosy, tuberculosis, smallpox, measles, and the treponemal diseases, syphilis and yaws. The increasing resolution of these disease narratives provides a basis for assessing not only when and how Asia was affected by them, but also how medical responses may have developed at both local and transcontinental levels.

 

Prof. Volker Scheid (Practitioner and historian, London)

Some Moments in the Encounter between Chinese Medicine and Covid-19

Before eventually some stable narrative will emerge about what Covid-19 is and does I will present some disparate moments in the encounter between Chinese medicine and this as yet only partially understood entity. My focus will be on the choices that various actors make in this encounter, ranging from the liberal press in the West to Chinese medicine practitioners and patients in China and the West. In these encounters Covid-19 is invariably constructed as a threat as well as an opportunity in struggles over ideology and status as much as health and sheer physical survival.

 

Prof. A. David Napier (UCL Anthropology Dept., London)

Sick Societies and the Flow of Life

In the early 1980s I conducted fieldwork on ritual healing in Indonesia. The timing coincided with the then-emerging HIV/AIDS pandemic. Though the pandemic proved devastating globally, it was often understood at local levels in ways at odds with global narratives about mortality and morbidity. In particular, indigenous views of human agency in the face of biological threat alerted me to other ways of understanding viral diseases as invasive—especially in Bali, where the presence of potentially infectious foreigners was, and yet remains, ubiquitous and unavoidable. These lessons apply equally today in the face of Covid-19.