Dissertation Abstracts 79-05 A and B

Table of contents

  1. Essays on Natural Gas in the Transition to Sustainable Energy

Document 1 of 1

Essays on Natural Gas in the Transition to Sustainable Energy

Author: Marks, Levi

Publication info: University of California, Santa Barbara, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2019. 13901454.

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Abstract:

As the world transitions toward a low-carbon energy economy, two features of natural gas set it apart from other fossil fuels. First, the combustion of natural gas generates about half as much carbon dioxide as coal. Second, gas-fired electricity generation can be ramped up and down quickly and efficiently, making it well-suited for balancing out intermittently available wind and solar energy. These two factors lead many to believe natural gas will play an extended role in the electricity generation mix. However, there are many ways in which current markets for natural gas not well-adapted for its role in the energy transition. This dissertation explores two areas where natural gas markets can be improved for its efficient utilization in the transition to low-carbon energy. The first two chapters develop policy tools to help reduce methane emissions from the natural gas supply chain, and the third chapter investigates a previously unknown market failure that can arise in interconnected natural gas and electricity markets.

The first chapter of this dissertation empirically estimates the cost of reducing methane emissions from the extraction segment of the natural gas industry. Although natural gas has important climate benefits, it is composed of about 90 percent methane, which is itself a greenhouse gas that is far more potent than carbon dioxide. A small fraction of emitted gas (in the form of equipment leaks and intentional venting) can therefore have severe warming effects. This chapter estimates the cost of reducing these emissions by examining how production facilities’ emission rates respond to changes in natural gas prices. Because firms mitigate emissions up to the point at which their marginal cost of mitigation equals their marginal private benefit of being able to sell captured gas, an estimated relationship between emission rates and prices can be used to determine mitigation costs. Results indicate that methane emissions from natural gas production can be reduced at very low cost relative to other sources of greenhouse gas emissions. For example, an emissions price equivalent to the social cost of methane is predicted to decrease emissions by about 76 percent while increasing the net cost of natural gas extraction by less than one percent.

Building on this result, the second chapter explores how emissions pricing can be used to regulate methane emissions in practice. Previously, emissions pricing programs have been implemented based on the carbon content of fossil fuels or by using continuous emissions monitoring sensors placed in smokestacks. However, because methane emissions from the natural gas industry are released from many different sources in a variety of different ways, comprehensively monitoring them is prohibitively costly at this time. This chapter outlines a novel estimate-based approach for implementing emissions pricing in this setting. Rather than monitoring emissions at all facilities continuously, the regulator randomly selects a subset of each firm’s facilities to perform measurements at. The regulator then uses these measurements to develop a firm-level estimate of emissions, which can then be used to apply an emissions tax or account for the use of permits. A theoretical model demonstrates that this approach preserves the efficiency benefits of emissions pricing with comprehensive measurement. Furthermore, a simulation calibrated to be representative of the U.S. natural gas industry predicts that this approach can achieve climate mitigation benefits roughly two orders of magnitude greater than the cost of measurement.

The third chapter, which is coauthored with Charles F. Mason, Kristina Mohlin, and Matthew Zaragoza-Watkins, explores a market failure that can arise from the increasing interdependence of natural gas and electricity markets. It develops a theoretical model that illustrates conditions under which a firm that owns both electricity generation plants and contracts for natural gas pipeline capacity may find it optimal to withhold those contracts from secondary markets. By artificially limiting the available supply of pipeline capacity on constrained days, this behavior increases electricity prices in the downstream electricity generation market, which benefits non-gas generators owned by the withholding firms. We document pipeline scheduling patterns exhibited by two firms in New England that are consistent with this behavior. We then estimate the impacts of this behavior, finding that it increased wholesale natural gas and electricity prices by 35 percent and 18 percent, respectively. We estimate that substitution from natural gas generation to coal and oil generation due to these artificial supply constraints resulted in economic losses of $1.5 billion over a three-year period. While this behavior may have been within the firms’ contractual rights, these findings underscore a need to improve regulation and coordination of these increasingly linked energy markets.

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Subject: Environmental economics; Energy

Classification: 0438: Environmental economics; 0791: Energy

Identifier / keyword: Emissions pricing Emissions tax Energy Environment Methane Natural gas

Number of pages: 181

Publication year: 2019

Degree date: 2019

School code: 0035

Source: DAI-A 81/3(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781088313701

Advisor: Deschenes, Olivier

Committee member: Frech III, H E; Meng, Kyle; Zaragoza-Watkins , Matthew

University/institution: University of California, Santa Barbara

Department: Economics

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 13901454

ProQuest document ID: 2311055477

 

Table of contents

  1. Experimentalisms of the Self: Experiments in Art and Technology, 1966-1971
  2. Topics in Computational Bayesian Statistics With Applications to Hierarchical Models in Astronomy and Sociology
  3. Schelling’s <i>Ages of the World</i>: The Beginning of the Beginning
  4. Phylogeny, Psychology, and the Vicissitudes of Human Development: The Anxiety of Atavism
  5. Effects of historical story telling on student understanding of NOS and Mendelian genetics
  6. An Evolutionary and Developmental Science Framework for Integrating Attachment, Mentalization, and Mindfulness: Implications for Religious Practice and Moral Development
  7. Factors of Renewable Energy Deployment and Empirical Studies of United States Wind Energy
  8. Lords, Libraries, and Banquets: The Expansion of Mughal Imperial Society, 17<sup>th</sup>-18<sup>th</sup> C.
  9. The Pursuit of the Modern Mind: Popularization of Science, the Development of the Middle Classes, and Religious Transformation in the Ottoman Empire, 1860-1880
  10. Promiscuous Teleology and Folk Metaphysics
  11. The Birth of a Bioeconomy: Growing and Governing a Global Ethanol Production Network, 1920-2012
  12. Nitrogen Revolutions: Agricultural Expertise, Technology, and Policy in Cold War Chile
  13. Mathematical Explanation in Science
  14. Living Inventions: Genetically Modified Organisms and the Canadian Patent System, 1976-2004
  15. La aportación de la comunidad valenciana a la ciencia médica (1980-1984): estudio bibliométrico

Document 1 of 15

Experimentalisms of the Self: Experiments in Art and Technology, 1966-1971

Author: O’Brien, Kerry

Publication info: Indiana University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2018. 10743311.

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Abstract:

In 1966, artists Robert Rauschenberg and Robert Whitman joined Bell Labs engineers Billy Klüver and Fred Waldhauer to form the nonprofit organization Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.). Designed as a “matching agency” for artists and engineers, E.A.T. also served as a liaison with industrial sponsors to fund these collaborative projects. From 1966–71, the organization underwent a large-scale shift, in which E.A.T. artists and musicians began conceiving of technology more broadly as environments, situations, and processes: what E.A.T. called “techne.” Even when handling hardware technologies, like synthesizers and oscilloscopes, composers spoke in environmental or process-based terms; John Cage was tuning in, Steve Reich was phasing, La Monte Young was drifting, and Pauline Oliveros was droning and observing. Once these processes were underway, however, a composer’s focus often shifted to the psychospiritual effects these musical experiments were having on their minds and bodies. For composers active within E.A.T., their techne was often spiritual techne.

This dissertation examines four composers who were active with E.A.T.: John Cage, Steve Reich, La Monte Young, and Pauline Oliveros. In each case, their musical experiments were tightly bound up with their psychospiritual experiments. In E.A.T.’s founding event, John Cage attempted a Zen-influenced, non-egoic mode of participation of “tuning in” and “facilitating reception.” In his E.A.T. experiments, Steve Reich sought to program musical time and his fellow performers through a process he found analogous to yoga. Through E.A.T., La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela took their first pilgrimage to India, where they continued their work in “self-research.” In her E.A.T. project, Pauline Oliveros created “an electronic mantra without beginning or end.” In examining these composers’ hardware technologies alongside their psychospiritual technologies, this dissertation offers an alternative history of E.A.T. and identifies a tendency within American musical experimentalism to experiment on the self.?

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Subject: Music history; Music; History

Classification: 0208: Music history; 0413: Music; 0578: History

Identifier / keyword: Communication and the arts Social sciences Experimental music Experimentalism

Number of pages: 224

Publication year: 2018

Degree date: 2018

School code: 0093

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-59334-1

Advisor: Ford, Phil

Committee member: Burkholder, J. Peter; Kielian-Gilbert, Marianne C.; Melamed, Daniel R.

University/institution: Indiana University

Department: Musicology

University location: United States — Indiana

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10743311

ProQuest document ID: 2006239872

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2006239872?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 2 of 15

Topics in Computational Bayesian Statistics With Applications to Hierarchical Models in Astronomy and Sociology

Author: Sahai, Swupnil

Publication info: Columbia University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2018. 10639986.

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Abstract:

This thesis includes three parts. The overarching theme is how to analyze structured hierarchical data, with applications to astronomy and sociology. The first part discusses how expectation propagation can be used to parallelize the computation when fitting big hierarchical bayesian models. This methodology is then used to fit a novel, nonlinear mixture model to ultraviolet radiation from various regions of the observable universe. The second part discusses how the Stan probabilistic programming language can be used to numerically integrate terms in a hierarchical bayesian model. This technique is demonstrated on supernovae data to significantly speed up convergence to the posterior distribution compared to a previous study that used a Gibbs-type sampler. The third part builds a formal latent kernel representation for aggregate relational data as a way to more robustly estimate the mixing characteristics of agents in a network. In particular, the framework is applied to sociology surveys to estimate, as a function of ego age, the age and sex composition of the personal networks of individuals in the United States.

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Subject: Statistics; Astronomy; Sociology

Classification: 0463: Statistics; 0606: Astronomy; 0626: Sociology

Identifier / keyword: Pure sciences Social sciences Bayesian Computational Distributed Hierarchical Models Statistics

Number of pages: 118

Publication year: 2018

Degree date: 2018

School code: 0054

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-46469-6

Advisor: Gelman, Andrew   Zheng, Tian

University/institution: Columbia University

Department: Statistics

University location: United States — New York

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10639986

ProQuest document ID: 1999401926

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999401926?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 3 of 15

Schelling’s <i>Ages of the World</i>: The Beginning of the Beginning

Author: Jussaume, Andrew

Publication info: Duquesne University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10642337.

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Abstract:

This dissertation traces the development of Schelling’s philosophy of time as it appears in the Ages of the World, a work which Schelling himself never completed but which he clearly intended as his magnum opus. My project focuses on Schelling’s claim that time is the absolute, a claim which grew out of his Naturphilosophie and which later served as the basis for his fruitful interactions with Kierkegaard in Berlin. In the dissertation, I defend the thesis that Schelling’s concept of “beginnings” paves the way for an “organic” understanding of time which articulates the latter as a living, breathing entity. In short, my work attempts to prove that Schelling does not conceive of time as a horizon of being, or as a category of consciousness, but as the ultimate basis from which living things grow and evolve. As I write in the introduction to my project, time, for him does not simply “pass by;” instead, it “ripens,” and “bears fruit.” Similarly, living things are not merely in time, but time is in them insofar as living things produce time just as much as they are produced by it.

Supporting this thesis is my investigation into Schelling’s concept of “ground” [Grund], which regards time as a contradiction-producing a priori. Time begins with the free decision of the subject; however, this free decision is grounded, paradoxically, in the subject’s confrontation with its own fate. “Ground,” then, has the character of irreducible indeterminacy, giving time the character of “unprethinkability” [Unvordenklichkeit ]. In the opening lines of the Ages of the World , Schelling argues that “only the past can be known.” However, as I demonstrate, Schelling’s insights on “ground,” in addition to fragmentary nature of his essay, prove otherwise. Instead, what we discover in the Ages of the World is the unfolding of the insight that even the origin of history remains obscure to us, and that this obscurity is endemic to all “beginnings” in time, past, present, and future.

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Subject: Metaphysics; Philosophy

Classification: 0396: Metaphysics; 0422: Philosophy

Identifier / keyword: Philosophy, religion and theology Ground Metaphysics of freedom Philosophy of time Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von The Ages of the World Weltalter

Number of pages: 242

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0067

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-60334-7

Advisor: Swindal, James

Committee member: Lampert, Jay; Lawrence, Joseph P.

University/institution: Duquesne University

Department: Philosophy

University location: United States — Pennsylvania

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10642337

ProQuest document ID: 2008122133

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2008122133?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 4 of 15

Phylogeny, Psychology, and the Vicissitudes of Human Development: The Anxiety of Atavism

Author: Pittenger, Frank

Publication info: Duquesne University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10619297.

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Abstract:

This cross-disciplinary dissertation provides a missing intellectual history of an ostensibly dead idea. Once widely held and no less elegant for its obsolescence, the principle of biogenetic recapitulation is best remembered by its defining mantra, “ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny.” Among psychologists and sociologists as well as embryologists, the notion that the development of any individual organism repeats in compressed, miniaturized form the entire history of its species enjoyed broad (if not uncontested) acceptance through the early twentieth century. The author reexamines the origins of this theory in the work of Charles Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, and traces its influence in psychology from early psychoanalytic theory to late twentieth-century evolutionary neuroscience. It is argued that recapitulationism (or the “biogenetic law”) appealed to psychological theorists for its moral and affective implications, rather than its scientific merit or usefulness in generating testable hypotheses. Central to this study is an emphasis on the use of recapitulationism to critique doctrines of evolutionary and social progress. The dissertation concludes that for contemporary neuroscientists no less than early psychoanalysts, the ghost of phylogeny, or the evolutionary past, is most often summoned to explain worrisome and unexpected disruptions in normal human development—especially when those disruptions emerge within what is taken to be the height of modernity.

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Subject: Evolution and Development; History; Psychology

Classification: 0412: Evolution and Development; 0578: History; 0621: Psychology

Identifier / keyword: Biological sciences Social sciences Psychology Death drive Metapsychology Phylogeny Psychoanalysis Recapitulationism Triune brain

Number of pages: 181

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0067

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-60307-1

Advisor: Burston, Daniel

Committee member: Kranjec, Alexander; McCurry, Jeffrey

University/institution: Duquesne University

Department: Clinical Psychology

University location: United States — Pennsylvania

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10619297

ProQuest document ID: 2007522251

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2007522251?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 5 of 15

Effects of historical story telling on student understanding of NOS and Mendelian genetics

Author: Williams, Cody Tyler

Publication info: Western Michigan University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10758406.

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Abstract:

Science education researchers have long advocated the central role of the nature of science (NOS) for our understanding of scientific literacy. NOS is often interpreted narrowly to refer to a host of epistemological claims associated with the process of science and the limitations of scientific knowledge. Despite its importance, practitioners and researchers alike acknowledge that students have difficulty learning NOS and that this in part reflects how difficult it is to teach. Many teachers are uncomfortable with taking time away from traditional science content instruction. One promising method for teaching NOS and science content involves an explicit and reflective approach using historical stories. The purpose of this study is to compare a traditionally taught genetics unit in a non-major introductory biology course, to the same genetics unit taught using a historical story based on Gregor Mendel. A mixed method approach was used to determine whether and how the use of historical stories influences undergraduates’ understanding of NOS and genetics content. Particular attention was paid to the explanations students used for their understandings. Intervention and control groups completed the SUSSI instrument and a two-tier genetics instrument pre- and post-instruction. A subset of both groups was also interviewed regarding their responses to both instruments and their experiences in the course.

The SUSSI Likert results showed that students in the intervention group made statistically significant gains in their understanding of the role of imagination and creativity in science. These results indicate that the introduction of historical stories helped participants gain a better understanding of this aspect of NOS. The interviews provided additional support in that participants mentioned historical stories in their explanations for why they changed towards more informed views on SUSSI items related to imagination and creativity. Additionally, students recognized that stories were used in the intervention group without prompting and felt they were helpful for learning about science. The genetics two-tier instrument results showed that participants made more statistically significant gains in their genetics content understanding in the intervention group than the control group. The current study adds to a growing body of literature regarding the use of stories in the science classroom. The results provide support for using historical stories to improve student understanding of NOS as well as more traditional science content. This study suggests further research into the role of stories in science instruction.

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Subject: Science history; Science education

Classification: 0585: Science history; 0714: Science education

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Education Mendel Nature of science Stories

Number of pages: 112

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0257

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-61494-7

Advisor: Rudge, David W.

Committee member: Petcovic, Heather L.; Reeves, Patricia L.

University/institution: Western Michigan University

Department: Science Education

University location: United States — Michigan

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10758406

ProQuest document ID: 2007217424

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2007217424?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 6 of 15

An Evolutionary and Developmental Science Framework for Integrating Attachment, Mentalization, and Mindfulness: Implications for Religious Practice and Moral Development

Author: Kreiselmaier, Andrew Kent

Publication info: Vanderbilt University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10753398.

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Abstract: None available.

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Subject: Neurosciences; Religion; Cultural anthropology; Developmental psychology

Classification: 0317: Neurosciences; 0318: Religion; 0326: Cultural anthropology; 0620: Developmental psychology

Identifier / keyword: Philosophy, religion and theology Biological sciences Social sciences Psychology Attachment theory Axial age Cosmopolitanism Evolutionary neuroscience Mentalization Mindfulness

Number of pages: 391

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0242

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-55581-3

Advisor: Gay, Volney P.

Committee member: Hamman, Jacobus J.; Meador, Keith G.; Park, Sohee

University/institution: Vanderbilt University

Department: Religion

University location: United States — Tennessee

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10753398

ProQuest document ID: 2006913237

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2006913237?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global; Psychology Database

Document 7 of 15

Factors of Renewable Energy Deployment and Empirical Studies of United States Wind Energy

Author: Can Sener, Serife Elif

Publication info: Clemson University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10619619.

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Abstract:

Considered essential for countries’ development, energy demand is growing worldwide. Unlike conventional sources, the use of renewable energy sources has multiple benefits, including increased energy security, sustainable economic growth, and pollution reduction, in particular greenhouse gas emissions. Nevertheless, there is a considerable difference in the share of renewable energy sources in national energy portfolios. This dissertation contains a series of studies to provide an outlook on the existing renewable energy deployment literature and empirically identify the factors of wind energy generation capacity and wind energy policy diffusion in the U.S.

The dissertation begins with a systematic literature review to identify drivers and barriers which could help in understanding the diverging paths of renewable energy deployment for countries. In the analysis, economic, environmental, and social factors are found to be drivers, whereas political, regulatory, technical potential and technological factors are not classified as either a driver or a barrier (i.e., undetermined). Each main category contains several subcategories, among which only national income is found to have a positive impact, whereas all other subcategories are considered undetermined. No significant barriers to the deployment of renewable energy sources are found over the analyzed period.

Wind energy deployment within the states related to environmental and economic factors was seldom discussed in the literature. The second study of the dissertation is thus focused on the wind energy deployment in the United States. Wind energy is among the most promising clean energy sources and the United States has led the world in per capita newly installed generation capacity since 2000. In the second study, using a fixed-effects panel data regression analysis, the significance of a number of economic and environmental factors are investigated for 39 states from 2000 to 2015. The results suggested that the increase in economic factors is related to a significant increase in the installed wind energy capacity, whereas, the increase in environmental factors is related to a significant decrease in the installed wind capacity.

The final study explores the factors of diffusion of state- and local-level wind energy support policies which are considered fundamental factors of the continuum and development of wind power in the United States. To reveal the internal determinants of state’s wind energy policy diffusion, we further narrow the scope and control for the geographical region in the final study. We limit our analysis to seven neighboring Midwestern states, which are located in the center of United States wind energy corridor. Using data from 2008 to 2015, the study investigates the significance of the following internal factors: wind power potential, per capita gross state product, unemployment rate, per capita value of the agriculture sector, number of establishments in agricultural sector, and state government control. Through the addition of interaction terms, the study also considers the behavioral differences in the explanatory variables under Republican and non-Republican state governance. Our findings suggest that the economic development potential and related environmental benefits were the common motivation for state- and local-level policy makers. Lastly, technical terms and agricultural sector presence provides additional motives for the state level diffusion of wind energy policies.

The findings of this dissertation are expected to contribute to the understanding of how countries and states might best stimulate and support renewable energy, and in particular wind energy, deployment.

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Subject: Alternative Energy; Environmental Studies; Energy

Classification: 0363: Alternative Energy; 0477: Environmental Studies; 0791: Energy

Identifier / keyword: Applied sciences Health and environmental sciences Renewable energy United states Wind energy

Number of pages: 187

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0050

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-61791-7

Advisor: Sharp, Julia L.   Anctil, Annick

Committee member: Dickes, Lori A.; Ransom, Bruce

University/institution: Clemson University

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies

University location: United States — South Carolina

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10619619

ProQuest document ID: 2003138775

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2003138775?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 8 of 15

Lords, Libraries, and Banquets: The Expansion of Mughal Imperial Society, 17<sup>th</sup>-18<sup>th</sup> C.

Author: Siddiqui, Hasan Zahid

Publication info: The University of Chicago, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10641157.

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Abstract:

This dissertation is a study of the social and intellectual history of Mughal imperial society focused on two axes of historical change: the elaboration and intensification of aristocratic autonomy from the early seventeenth century and the generalization of imperial regimes of knowledge that tracked the expansion of the empire as a whole. Drawing on three bodies of sources — histories of aristocratic lineages, the records of libraries and colleges, and the oeuvres of imperial scholars — this dissertation argues that developments at the provincial peripheries of the empire drove a greater uniformity in the imperial intellectual culture, particularly by the end of the seventeenth century as imperial society absorbed masses of new participants. This process was joined to a second one by which long-gestating regimes of aristocratic autonomy asserted their difference from the imperial court. The dissertation concludes with an exploration of the characteristic features of late-imperial intellectual life that emerged at the intersection of these two axes. Taken together, the analyses in the dissertation offer an account of key political contingencies and hierarchical and spatial structures that shaped Mughal imperial culture in the seventeenth and first half of the eighteenth centuries.

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Subject: History; South Asian Studies

Classification: 0578: History; 0638: South Asian Studies

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Aristocracy Early modern Intellectual history Libraries Mughal Empire South Asia

Number of pages: 240

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0330

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-51997-6

Advisor: Alam, Muzaffar   Chakrabarty, Dipesh

Committee member: Pomeranz, Kenneth; Woods, John

University/institution: The University of Chicago

Department: History

University location: United States — Illinois

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10641157

ProQuest document ID: 2002575361

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2002575361?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 9 of 15

The Pursuit of the Modern Mind: Popularization of Science, the Development of the Middle Classes, and Religious Transformation in the Ottoman Empire, 1860-1880

Author: Asil, Ercüment

Publication info: The University of Chicago, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10601514.

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Abstract:

This dissertation explores the popularization of modern natural sciences in the Ottoman Empire through the lenses of earliest popular scientific journals published during the 1860s and 1880s, situating this process of popularization within the socio-political transformation triggered and regulated by the Tanzimat reforms. In this context, the dissertation argues that the acquisition and popularization of modern European sciences in the Ottoman Empire was not merely a question of transfer but one of cultural translation that involved intra and international power relations. The audience of this translation primarily were the rising educated Ottoman middle classes. Hence, their socio-cultural background, needs, and aspirations shaped the representation of this new knowledge, which was intimately related to questions of citizenship, religious identity, and Islam’s role in their modern world. Promoters of the modern sciences did not constitute a uniform bloc. While they were united in their goal to undo the European colonial power attached to science, the promoters of modern sciences were in competition with each other in negotiating the benefits that would be derived from the prestige of this new knowledge. The dissertation at large confirms the revisionist view concerning the history of the relationship between science and religion by showing that promoters of modern science anchored it in the Islamicate culture. The study also underlines that this process of anchoring was a reciprocal one that resulted in the rearticulation of this culture in a way that would meet modern needs.

The first and second chapters of this dissertation depict the tension between two competing groups, one being a more Westernist and elite group of bureaucrats and the other a coalition of younger and relatively more conservative bureaucrats. These two chapters mostly analyze the moral and religious concerns of this younger group and how they rearticulated the Islamicate cultural tradition for their purposes. Chapter three describes the broadening of the social base of the speakers and audience of modern sciences, analyzing in detail the making of Hadika as a popular science journal for the Ottoman middle classes. Chapter four specifically focuses on the role religion played in Hadika through four different, albeit related, discourses, i.e., the natural theological, the sacralizing, philosophical, and legal-theological discourses. The last chapter analyzes the employment of Şemseddin Sami’s natural theological reasoning in the making of his popular scientific language, which demonstrated an Islamicate form of deism.

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Subject: Middle Eastern history; History; Science history

Classification: 0333: Middle Eastern history; 0578: History; 0585: Science history

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Cultural transformation Middle classes Ottoman modernization Popularization of science Religious reform Sami, Şemseddin

Number of pages: 397

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0330

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-51908-2

Advisor: Shissler, Ada Holly

Committee member: Bashkin, Orit; Fleischer, Cornell

University/institution: The University of Chicago

Department: Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

University location: United States — Illinois

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10601514

ProQuest document ID: 2002300379

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2002300379?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 10 of 15

Promiscuous Teleology and Folk Metaphysics

Author: Rose, David

Publication info: Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10753135.

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Abstract:

The primary aim of my dissertation is to set out one important role that cognitive science can play in debates in metaphysics. The focus of my dissertation is the appeal to intuitions in metaphysics. In certain metaphysical disputes, we often see common sense or folk intuitions being invoked in evaluating competing metaphysical theories. But when metaphysical theories are charged with violating common sense or folk intuitions, the charges tend to be met by claiming that the target theory is not, after all, at odds with what the folk think on the matter. As a result, we often end up with conflicting claims about what the folk think.

Here is one of the key ways that I see cognitive science contributing to metaphysics: Cognitive science can enter into the discussion by helping to identify the content of the relevant folk view under consideration. But the usefulness of cognitive science to metaphysics doesn’t end there. Having identified the content of common sense on the target issue, a question remains as to how much weight, if any, should be placed on the folk view under consideration in evaluating target metaphysical theories. In other words: does the relevant folk view deserve to be respected or rejected in evaluating metaphysical theories? Empirical evidence from cognitive science can enter again here and play an important role in evaluating whether the relevant aspect of the folk view is respectable or based on an unreliable or otherwise poor cognitive process. Taken together, one of the key ways that cognitive science can contribute to metaphysics is by identifying what the relevant folk view under consideration is and whether the relevant folk intuitions deserve to be taken seriously.

I focus on metaphysical disputes over composition, persistence and causation and the role of ordinary metaphysical beliefs in serving as a constraint on theories in these areas. Drawing on work in psychology, most notably the work of Deborah Kelemen, I find that the folk take a promiscuous teleological outlook on reality: all of nature—every rock and cloud—is viewed as being infused with agency and purpose. I bring the background psychological evidence into the discussion and also conduct various studies of my own, providing a range of evidence suggesting that this tendency toward promiscuous teleological thinking plays a significant role in folk intuitions about composition, persistence and causation. In light of this, I argue that folk intuitions about these matters deserve to be dismissed, that there is a debunking explanation for these folk intuitions. In short: metaphysical theories of composition, persistence and causation should not be beholden to folk intuitions since the folk view on these matters is tied into a primitive teleological view of nature.

I take myself to have illustrated a key way in which cognitive science can contribute to metaphysics. When folk intuitions are invoked as a constraint on metaphysical theories, cognitive science can enter in to help determine not only what the content of the relevant folk view is but also to help decide whether the relevant folk intuitions deserve to be taken seriously. In this way, cognitive science can help provide empirically informed debunking explanations and thus liberate certain metaphysical theories from the demand that they conform to folk intuitions.

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Subject: Metaphysics; Philosophy

Classification: 0396: Metaphysics; 0422: Philosophy

Identifier / keyword: Philosophy, religion and theology Causation Composition Debunking Folk metaphysics Persistence Promiscuous teleology

Number of pages: 268

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0190

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-55230-0

Advisor: Schaffer, Jonathan

University/institution: Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick

Department: Philosophy

University location: United States — New Jersey

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10753135

ProQuest document ID: 2002082206

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2002082206?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 11 of 15

The Birth of a Bioeconomy: Growing and Governing a Global Ethanol Production Network, 1920-2012

Author: Martin, Abigail Noelle

Publication info: University of California, Berkeley, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10621121.

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Abstract:

This dissertation examines the history of ethanol policymaking and the growth of a global ethanol production network, a cornerstone of the emerging low-carbon, bio-based economy. In this way, the study also provides insights into the nature of economic and environmental governance of this bio-based economy, analyzing the effects at multiple jurisdictional levels. I conducted research in Brazil and the United States, the two countries responsible for the vast majority of global ethanol production. The dissertation draws on data collected using qualitative methods including document analysis, interviews conducted in English and Portuguese, and multi-sited ethnographic investigation at nodes along ethanol commodity chains. The dissertation is divided into two parts, in which I first analyze the social, cultural and political forces that have influenced national ethanol production and consumption strategies, practices, and policies, before turning to the contemporary transnational governance arrangements determining the low-carbon value of ethanol and other biofuels on global markets. Together, Parts I and II emphasize the role of ideas and expertise in the transformation of ethanol and other biofuels, from agricultural support crops to the first globally traded commodities to be sold with low-carbon sustainability credentials.

Broadly, the four chapters in Part I examine the ways in which governments have transformed the economic geography of ethanol production networks anchored in Brazilian sugarcane and American corn. Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5 examine how nationally specific political cultures of economic governance have influenced ethanol policymaking. In Chapter 2, I present a new framework for understanding the relationship between ethanol policymaking and political cultures of economic governance as a way to shed new light on the cultural and structural conditions of state support for low-carbon development. Chapters 3 and 4 address the US case exclusively. In Chapter 3, I provide a genealogical analysis of the evolution of political culture since the formation of the nation-state, tracing how key ideas and practices regarding economic governance have emerged and receded leading up through the 1970s. In Chapter 4, I weave the history of US ethanol policymaking into this genealogical analysis, using the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries to show how political culture has helped to constitute the vision, strategies and policies used to build the US ethanol statecraft. Chapter 5 applies the same analysis in Chapter 4 to the case of Brazil. The overarching argument developed is that the US and Brazil have differently governed ethanol expansion in accordance with their unique political cultures of state intervention. In addition, these cases suggest that ethanol statecraft also helps to constitute a nation’s political cultures of economic governance.

In Part II, I examine one particular form of economic governance: the emerging global regime complex for biofuels governance. I shift the usual focus of policy analysis from the national level to the transnational level. I conduct a fine-grained analysis of the governance arrangements shaping the global biofuels production network. I advance the argument that a global regime complex for biofuels has emerged and indicates that the politics of expertise provide a new mode of regime complex orchestration. Chapter 6 situates global environmental governance for biofuels as part of a broader historical trend away from multilateral regimes to regime complexes. This began in the forestry sector, which I unpack to use as a critical exemplar. Chapter 7 explores how the low-carbon justification for industrial policies that have increased ethanol production and consumption around the world requires nation-states to arbitrate the meaning of “low-carbon” value through the politics of expertise. This chapter looks closely at the scientific controversy that emerged around models developed to calculate the lifecycles of greenhouse gas emissions produced by different biofuel commodity chains. Chapter 8 provides a theory of regime complex orchestration based on the biofuels regime complex. This theorization emphasizes the ways in which the regime complex structure empowers transnational networks of experts to orchestrate coordination between regimes. The experimentalist architecture of the regime complex for biofuels empowers experts to steer outcomes through think deliberation. In effect, this group of non-state actors has pulled various regimes for biofuels towards broad agreement about the value of including indirect land use change variables in GHG calculator models. Taken together, these findings offer several theoretical and practical insights into the kinds of democratic institutional capacities that are required for a just transition to a low-carbon future.

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Subject: Environmental Studies; Agricultural economics; Political science; Public policy

Classification: 0477: Environmental Studies; 0503: Agricultural economics; 0615: Political science; 0630: Public policy

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Health and environmental sciences Biofuel Brazil Ethanol Low-carbon Political culture United States

Number of pages: 237

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0028

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-57271-1

Advisor: Iles, Alastair

Committee member: Ansell, Christopher; O’Neill, Kate; Peluso, Nancy

University/institution: University of California, Berkeley

Department: Environmental Science, Policy, & Management

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10621121

ProQuest document ID: 2001147633

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2001147633?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global; Worldwide Political Science Abstracts

Document 12 of 15

Nitrogen Revolutions: Agricultural Expertise, Technology, and Policy in Cold War Chile

Author: San Martin, William

Publication info: University of California, Davis, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10623595.

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Abstract:

This dissertation studies the process of knowledge and technology transfer that led to Chile’s first massive expansion of nitrogen fertilizer consumption in the second half of the twentieth century. The increasing use of nitrogen fertilizer remains central to the process of agro-technological change known as the Green Revolution and is one of the main drivers of present-day global environmental change. To reverse the negative effects of the Green Revolution, scientists and policy-makers around the world are working today on expanding management practices, technologies, and policies to reduce the ecological effects of nitrogen fertilizers and enhance environmental protection, which is referred to as “the global nitrogen challenge”. Using Chile—one of the highest consumers of nitrogen fertilizer in the Americas today—as a case study, this research places Chile’s efforts to increase fertilizer consumption within the country’s long history of agro-technological change and offers a novel approach to the application of historical analysis to contemporary environmental issues.

It argues that between 1951 and 1973, Chilean and U.S. government institutions and agricultural experts established a transnational model of state-led, multiagency cooperation that was critical in expanding agricultural research, technologies, and education. Within a Cold War context this transnational institutional framework dramatically transformed agricultural expertise, fertilizer consumption, and the state itself. This claim calls into question the generalized arguments that market-based policies and neoliberal models of agricultural production were more efficient for technology transfer and increasing food production, and that the Chilean state was structurally incapable of modernizing agricultural practices before 1973. Chile’s extensive increase in nitrogen fertilizer consumption—what I call Chile’s nitrogen revolution—was instead a product of this state-led transnational institutional framework. Radical anti-communist politics and market-based policies established after the 1973 military coup, however, largely disassembled this institutional framework. I conclude that Chile’s capacity to effectively face its nitrogen challenge and expand the use of more efficient fertilization practices and technologies depends on rebuilding this institutional framework for knowledge and technology transfer.

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Subject: Latin American history; Environmental Studies; Science history

Classification: 0336: Latin American history; 0477: Environmental Studies; 0585: Science history

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Health and environmental sciences Agriculture Chile Cold war Green revolution History Nitrogen

Number of pages: 211

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0029

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United State s

ISBN: 978-0-355-46196-1

Advisor: Walker, Charles   Schlotterbeck, Marian

Committee member: Jarvis, Lovell; Schlotterbeck, Marian; Walker, Charles

University/institution: University of California, Davis

Department: History

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10623595

ProQuest document ID: 1999017112

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999017112?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 13 of 15

Mathematical Explanation in Science

Author: Koo, Alexander

Publication info: University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015. 10185825.

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Abstract:

Inspired by indispensability arguments originating from Quine, mathematical realists such as Alan Baker argue that since mathematics plays a key explanatory role in our best scientific theories, then the very same reasons which convince us to be scientific realists should lead us to be mathematical realists as well. Baker’s enhanced indispensability arguments (EIA) makes use of inference to the best explanation (IBE) to deliver the realist conclusion. Mathematical nominalists have resisted this argument by asserting that there is no such thing as a genuine mathematical explanation (GME) where the mathematics is playing an indispensable explanatory role. In this dissertation I will argue that the nominalist is incorrect and that GMEs do, in fact, exist. My methodology will be to develop a set of criteria that clearly defines a GME which the nominalist would gladly accept. From there, a new example of a GME will be advanced that satisfies all of the criteria. To solidify this result, I will show that Strevens’ kairetic account of scientific explanation clearly points to mathematics playing an indispensable explanatory role in our supposed examples of GME. While this all bodes well for mathematical realism, I will further argue that the EIA still does not lead to mathematical realism. Baker assumes that using IBE to infer the existence of mathematical objects is unproblematic. I will challenge this assumption, and without IBE the EIA does not deliver. By no means does this result block the realist project. Ultimately, I believe that freeing ourselves from the yoke of traditional indispensability arguments and focussing on how it is that mathematics can explain physical facts explain will advance the realist position even further.

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Subject: Philosophy of Science

Classification: 0402: Philosophy of Science

Identifier / keyword: Philosophy, religion and theology Explanation Indispensability Inference to the best explanation Mathematical explanation Naturalism Realism

Number of pages: 201

Publication year: 2015

Degree date: 2015

School code: 0779

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-46656-0

Advisor: Brown, James R.

Committee member: Berkovitz, Joseph; Pincock, Christopher; Thompson, Paul; Walsh, Denis

University/institution: University of Toronto (Canada)

Department: History and Philosophy of Science and Technology

University location: Canada

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10185825

ProQuest document ID: 1999436298

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999436298?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 14 of 15

Living Inventions: Genetically Modified Organisms and the Canadian Patent System, 1976-2004

Author: Moore, Rebecca

Publication info: University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015. 10185820.

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Abstract:

This dissertation tells the history of the interaction between the Canadian patent system and conceptions of the organism. Although organisms have been modified by humans for millennia, their entry into the patent system demanded they be understood as human inventions in accordance with the requirements of the Patent Act. It was not enough for an organism to simply be modified by humans; instead, the modified organism had to be seen as designed and controlled by a human inventor. I explore how the organism became conceived as a living invention during the patent process. The result is a contemporary history that sheds light on Canada’s current, convoluted approach to the patenting of organisms, where “lower” organisms are patentable in their entirety and “higher” organisms are not, yet patents on pieces of “higher” organisms (i.e., patents on genes contained within an organism) give the inventor control over the whole organism.

This dissertation is organized around two questions: 1) How was the organism described in the Canadian patent system? 2) Why was the organism described in this way? These questions are explored through a close analysis of four key patent applications filed with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office, beginning in 1976, and their subsequent journey through the Canadian judicial system.

I argue that in order to answer these questions, these cases must be understood in the context of the nexus between the molecularization of biology, government and corporate investment in biotechnology, and the nature of legal protection provided by the state. It is only at this nexus that one can explain why whole, modified organisms found their way into the patent system in the first place while also illuminating how—as a consequence of their entry into the patent system—organisms were described.

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Subject: Canadian history; Philosophy of Science; Patent Law; Science history

Classification: 0334: Canadian history; 0402: Philosophy of Science; 0562: Patent Law; 0585: Science history

Identifier / keyword: Philosophy, religion and theology Social sciences Canada Genetically modified organisms History of biotechnology History of patents Science policy

Number of pages: 246

Publication year: 2015

Degree date: 2015

School code: 0779

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-46655-3

Advisor: Vicedo, Marga

Committee member: Castle, David; Gold, Richard

University/institution: University of Toronto (Canada)

Department: History and Philosophy of Science and Technology

University location: Canada

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10185820

ProQuest document ID: 1999436276

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999436276?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 15 of 15

La aportación de la comunidad valenciana a la ciencia médica (1980-1984): estudio bibliométrico

Author: Abad Perez, Irene

Publication info: Universitat de Valencia (Spain), ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1987. U607451.

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Abstract: None available.

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Subject: Science history

Classification: 0585: Science history

Identifier / keyword: (UMI)AAIU607451 Social sciences Community health

Number of pages: 980

Publication year: 1987

Degree date: 1987

School code: 5871

Source: DAI-C 73/07, Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-1-303-90356-4

University/institution: Universitat de Valencia (Spain)

Department: Facultad de Medicina

University location: Spain

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: Spanish

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: U607451

ProQuest document ID: 1526269409

Table of contents

  1. Reconstructing the invasion history of Lyme disease in North America
  2. The Rise of the Bo: Autonomous Strongmen, Opium Capital, and State Formation in Mainland Southeast Asia (1948-1996)
  3. Invisible Wounds: Rethinking Recogniton in Decolonial Narratives of Illness and Disability
  4. Choreographies of Disablement
  5. Tuberculosis Disease Incidence Estimation among Foreign-born Persons, Los Angeles County 2005-2011
  6. Child Welfare and the Imperial Management of Childhood in Settler Colonial Canada, 1880s-2000s
  7. Up To Date and Progressive Winchester and Frederick County Virginia, 1870–1980

Document 1 of 7

Reconstructing the invasion history of Lyme disease in North America

Author: Walter, Katharine Sassandra

Publication info: Yale University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10783471.

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Abstract:

Over the last half-century, previously undescribed tick-borne pathogens including the Lyme disease bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi, have rapidly spread across the Northeast and Midwest United States. Lyme disease is now the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in North America, with over 300,000 estimated cases each year in the United States. Despite its epidemiological importance, many questions remain about this ongoing invasion. Does the observed spread of human cases reflect the ecological spread of the Lyme disease bacteria or does it reflect changes in case reporting and recognition? How do ticks and tick-borne pathogens spread across space and why are tick-borne pathogens currently invading the US? A better understanding of the ecological and evolutionary history of Lyme disease in North America will inform predictions about its future spread and how control measures might be implemented.

Reconstructing the invasion of Lyme disease is challenging because B. burgdorferi circulates in an enzootic cycle; humans are only incidental hosts. This means that reported cases of disease may not reflect the underlying ecological spread of B. burgdorferi. Pathogen genomes offer an alternative data source for reconstructing the history of pathogen invasion. However, this requires large population-scale samples of pathogen genomes that are difficult to generate from field samples. Further, for pathogen genomes to be informative, pathogens must evolve on similar timescales to ecological spread.

My dissertation work integrates diverse data sources–human case reports and pathogen genomic data–to reconstruct the history of B. burgdorferi in North America. In Chapter One, I present a spatio-temporal model for the spread of human cases of Lyme disease and babesiosis, another tick-borne disease, across New England. Our model uses use the best available longitudinal data–human surveillance data–to model the underlying ecological spread of tick-borne pathogens. Our model predicts that tick- borne diseases spread in a diffusion-like manner, at approximately 10 km per year, with occasional long-distance dispersal, likely due to spread by avian hosts. The remaining studies rely on pathogen genomic data. In Chapter Two, I tackle the methodological challenge of generating genomic data from mixed template samples by developing a method to capture multiple pathogen genomes from individual field-collected tick samples. This approach allowed us to efficiently differentiate between pathogen DNA versus tick and other exogenous DNA, enabling efficient deep sequencing and population genomic study. In Chapter Three, I examined the genomic diversity of B. burgdorferi within individual field-collected ticks. I found that 70% of ticks are infected with multiple strains of the Lyme disease bacteria, indicating that humans may be exposed to and infected with more than one strain of the bacteria from a single tick bite. I also find evidence that the Lyme disease bacteria is evolving in response to the immune defenses of its natural hosts (including rodents and birds). Finally, in Chapter Four, I examined patterns of B. burgdorferi genomic variation across space. I find that B. burgdorferi diversity is ancient and predates not only the reported emergence of Lyme disease in humans over the last ~40 years, but also the last glacial maximum, ~20,000 years ago. Ultimately, population genomic data reveal that the recent emergence of Lyme disease in North America is not driven by a recent introduction or evolution of B. burgdorferi. Instead, the recent epidemic of human Lyme disease is likely driven by environmental and ecological changes that have increased the density of ticks, infected ticks, and/or frequency of human exposures to infected ticks in the past century.

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Subject: Biology; Evolution and Development; Epidemiology

Classification: 0306: Biology; 0412: Evolution and Development; 0766: Epidemiology

Identifier / keyword: Biological sciences Health and environmental sciences Bacteria Genomics Invasion Lyme Disease Phylogeography Ticks

Number of pages: 196

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0265

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-70937-7

Advisor: Diuk-Wasser, Maria

University/institution: Yale University

University location: United States — Connecticut

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10783471

ProQuest document ID: 2023467205

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2023467205?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 2 of 7

The Rise of the Bo: Autonomous Strongmen, Opium Capital, and State Formation in Mainland Southeast Asia (1948-1996)

Author: Buchanan, John A.

Publication info: University of Washington, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10636454.

ProQuest document link

Abstract:

The Shan State of Burma became one of the most politically fragmented areas of the post World War II period. In rural areas, autonomous strongmen exercised social control independently of central state leaders and became a pervasive form of political authority.

This dissertation examines the conditions under which autonomous strongmen emerge. It draws on a state and society approach to argue that where local access to resources coincide with societal dislocations individuals can, by careful use of rewards, sanctions, symbols, and meaning-laden practices, gain acceptance of their rulemaking authority from society. It starts with an examination of the booms in opium production taking place in Mainland Southeast after 1940. Next, it examines the dislocations in Shan State and the emergence of autonomous strongmen. A final part looks at the configuration of authority in Kachin State of Burma, northern Thailand, and northern Laos. Comparative analysis of these sub regions shows the importance of the configuration of society, the availability of revenue from resources, and whether strongmen can offer segments of society strategies to meet their material and psychological needs in accounting for the emergence of autonomous strongmen. My argument challenges several tenets of the conventional wisdom about strongmen. One, it contests the belief that coercion or financial inducement is the primary basis for their domination of society. Two, it disputes the view that the presence of valuable resources, such as opium, accounts for the emergence of powerful strongmen. Additionally, the argument refutes the notion that state weakness in peripheral areas allows for their emergence. Finally, my findings indicate that autonomous strongmen are likely to remain a feature of the contemporary world order.

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Subject: Southeast Asian studies; International Relations; Political science

Classification: 0222: Southeast Asian studies; 0601: International Relations; 0615: Political science

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Civil wars Narcotics Political economy Southeast Asia State formation Strongmen

Number of pages: 395

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0250

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-59489-8

Advisor: Kier, Elizabeth

Committee member: Bachman, David; Callahan, Mary P.; Migdal, Joel S.

University/institution: University of Washington

Department: Political Science

University location: United States — Washington

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10636454

ProQuest document ID: 2006428650

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2006428650?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 3 of 7

Invisible Wounds: Rethinking Recogniton in Decolonial Narratives of Illness and Disability

Author: Ureña, Carolyn Margaret

Publication info: Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10753148.

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Abstract:

Working at the interface of literary studies, decolonial theory, and disability studies, my dissertation draws on literature and film across a variety of genres, including fiction by Ralph Ellison, Gabriel García Márquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Díaz, to demonstrate how literary narratives about illness and disability contribute to understanding racial formations and ameliorating colonial wounds. The dissertation develops a critical framework for understanding the ways in which a sustained encounter between critical race studies, disability studies, and the medical humanities can generate new conceptions of health and healing. I accomplish this through a reassessment of the writings of decolonial theorist Frantz Fanon, a physician who used narrative case studies and ethnography to illuminate the imbrication of race, illness, and disability. By introducing a decolonial perspective to the study of narratives of illness and disability, this project not only challenges the medical humanities and disability studies to consider the experience of race and the effects of colonialism, but also foregrounds questions of disability and illness within the fields of race theory and postcolonial studies, where they have until now received minimal scholarly attention.

Chapter one argues that Fanon’s clinical and philosophical perspective offers the medical humanities critical tools with which to dismantle binaries at the center of Western hegemonic thought and which serve to perpetuate Eurocentrism. As I build a theory of decolonial embodiment in chapter two, I work with Fanon’s and Ralph Ellison’s scathing critiques of Mark Robson’s 1949 Home of the Brave, a Hollywood film that problematically conflates blackness and disability. Read against the grain, the film also illuminates the limits of Eurocentric psychiatry’s understanding of the black subject. In chapter three I perform a comparative reading of Toni Morrison’s iconic neo-slave narrative Beloved and Gabriel García Márquez’s underexplored Of Love and Other Demons to examine the healing power of love in a decolonial context. My final chapter examines ethnographies of illness by medical anthropologists Paul Farmer and Cheryl Mattingly in light of Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth, which itself can be understood as a radical form of ethnography, to argue that beyond recognizing the suffering of people of color it is essential to take seriously the need to create a new narrative of the human that is not defined by European standards.

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Subject: Comparative literature

Classification: 0295: Comparative literature

Identifier / keyword: Language, literature and linguistics Critical race studies Decolonial healing Decolonial love Decolonial theory Disability studies Fanon, Frantz Medical humanities

Number of pages: 223

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0190

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-55242-3

Advisor: Jurecic, Ann

University/institution: Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick

Department: Comparative Literature

University location: United States — New Jersey

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10753148

ProQuest document ID: 2002533962

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2002533962?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 4 of 7

Choreographies of Disablement

Author: DiLodovico, Amanda

Publication info: Temple University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10641960.

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Abstract:

Choreographies of Disablement interrogates the historical relationship between dance and disability to recognize and define ‘disablement’ as a choreographic concept within contemporary dance practice. Working from choreographic analysis, interviews, and theories of sovereignty and crip time I argue ‘disablement’ grows out of the historical nexus in which Western concert dance, through the paradigm of ballet, was cultivated: the seventeenth century French political sphere and the prestige of a sovereign balletomane King. The performances of French kings in the burlesque ballet choreographies of 1624–1627 serve as the historical center of this research because disability has a political role to play at the dawn of concert dance in the West. This insight provides the historical perspective from which I locate the development of ‘disablement’ in the seventeenth century and identify its emergence in twenty-first century choreographies.

This dissertation uses the historical and political significance of the burlesque ballets as a touchstone to then analyze three contemporary sites of choreography produced between 2004 and 2016. Chapter 3 considers the repertory of German choreographer Raimund Hoghe, a queer disabled artist. I focus attention on his piece Sacre–The Rite of Spring (2004), which draws upon dance’s historical, canonical past. Chapter 4 focuses on Disabled Theater (2012), devised by French choreographer Jérôme Bel in collaboration with the Swiss-based company Theater Hora, a professional theater company comprised of performers with developmental disabilities. The piece is composed of theatrical tasks, including the presentation of self-choreographed dance solos. Chapter 5 centers on the collaborative performance work, A Fierce Kind of Love (2016), comprised of Philadelphia-based disabled and nondisabled performers with choreography by US dance artist Nichole Canuso. Taken together, my analysis of these sites questions the state of disability within the discursive space of dance studies, and in turn positions ‘disablement’ as a historically inflected site of choreographic thinking materializing in contemporary practice.

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Subject: Disability studies; Dance

Classification: 0201: Disability studies; 0378: Dance

Identifier / keyword: Communication and the arts Health and environmental sciences Choreographies Dance Disablement

Number of pages: 250

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0225

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-58877-4

Advisor: Franko, Mark

Committee member: Bond, Karen; Dodds, Sherril; Giersdorf, Jens Richard; Walters, Shannon

University/institution: Temple University

Department: Dance

University location: United States — Pennsylvania

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10641960

ProQuest document ID: 2002294707

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2002294707?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 5 of 7

Tuberculosis Disease Incidence Estimation among Foreign-born Persons, Los Angeles County 2005-2011

Author: Readhead, Adam

Publication info: University of California, Los Angeles, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10640625.

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Abstract:

Tuberculosis is a global public health issue with more than 2 billion people infected worldwide. It is also a serious public health concern within the United States with 9,557 cases of active disease diagnosed in 2015 alone. In the U.S., specific sub-groups, such as foreign-born persons, persons with diabetes or persons living with HIV or other immunocompromising conditions are known to be at higher risk of TB disease. Among foreign-born residents in the U.S., persons born in high-morbidity countries are known to be at even higher risk of developing the disease. Yet, TB disease incidence rates by country of birth are not reported at the local, state or national level despite these large, known differences in risk by country of birth. This is part due to the complications of using country-of-specific population estimates and technical challenges of using standard distributions to model a communicable disease. This thesis aims to call attention to this notable gap and, in part, to fill it.

Data on 5,447 diagnosed TB cases from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health TB Control Program were combined with stratified population estimates available from the Public Use Microdata Survey to calculate incidence rate of TB disease for the years 2005 through 2011, stratifying by country of birth and other demographic factors. Bayesian models were used to account for the uncertainty in the number of diagnoses and the population estimates. Extending these models into spatial analysis required the use of a hierarchical Bayesian model. Prediction models were constructed using bootstrap backward elimination and stochastic variable selection.

We estimated that the unadjusted incidence rate among persons born in the Philippines was 44.3 per 100,000 person-years and among persons born in Vietnam 38.7 per 100,000 person-years in comparison to 2.3 per 100,000 for U.S.-born persons. In spatial analysis, TB disease incidence was found to be spatially heterogeneous within Los Angeles County and remained so within high-risk countries of birth and when accounting for age, sex and years in residence. In prediction modeling, we found the addition of PUMA-level ecological variables did not improve the prediction of TB disease incidence beyond models using age, sex, country of birth and years in residence. With these three analytical approaches–non-spatial, spatial and prediction–we confirmed that TB disease incidence rates varied markedly by country of birth and showed that issues arising from the technical challenges of dependent outcomes, sparse data and uncertainty in population estimates can be ameliorated.

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Subject: Epidemiology

Classification: 0766: Epidemiology

Identifier / keyword: Health and environmental sciences Disease surveillance Epidemiology Infectious disease epimdeiology Spatial analysis Tuberculosis

Number of pages: 98

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0031

Source: DAI-B 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-46259-3

Advisor: Detels, Roger   Sorvillo, Frank J.

Committee member: Arah, Onyebuchi; Currier, Judith; Kim-Farley, Robert; Nielsen, Karin

University/institution: University of California, Los Angeles

Department: Epidemiology

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10640625

ProQuest document ID: 1999355408

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999355408?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 6 of 7

Child Welfare and the Imperial Management of Childhood in Settler Colonial Canada, 1880s-2000s

Author: Landertinger, Laura

Publication info: University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2017. 10634272.

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Abstract:

The Canadian child welfare system perpetuates deeply colonial relations. Indigenous children are being removed en masse, die at exceptionally high rates in the system, and the child welfare personnel is primarily drawn from the white settler society. This dissertation seeks to find answers to the question of how this present-day reality came to be and how Indigenous child removal can continue so vigorously.

This dissertation is a genealogical inquiry into the beginnings and development of the Canadian child welfare system. Through extensive archival research, it traces how this institutional framework re-articulates relations of coloniality – relations through which Indigenous peoples are rendered subjects to be managed and white settlers are re-inscribed as dominant, superior, and – despite the enormous violence that underpins their subject positions – as ‘caring’.

This dissertation advances the argument that the management of childhood is of central concern to the colonial/racial state. Child welfare emerged as an imperial project, for the purpose of white settler colonial nation-building. Animated by a colonial concern that the white race be preserved, early child-rescue initiatives focused on ‘saving’/managing the damaged but salvageable white settler child. These children were to be prevented from ‘sinking’ to the level of the Indian or racial Other, and molded into useful citizens for the white settler colony.

At the turn of twentieth century, Indigenous children were rendered extraneous to the emerging field of child welfare. State interest in the Indigenous child was an annihilative and carceral interest, animated by the idea that Indigenous children had to be removed and contained in institutions (i.e. Indian Residential Schools). While Indian Residential Schools were eventually phased out, the colonizers’ focus on Indigenous child removal remained. Indigenous child removal emerged as a central modality of colonial power, the intent of which was to effect Indigenous erasure and dispossession for the proliferation of the settler colony. This modality of power continues through the child welfare system today, sustaining the settler society’s annihilative and accumulative impulse, continuing to dispossess Indigenous peoples of their lands and sovereignty.

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Subject: Canadian studies; Sociology; Native American studies

Classification: 0385: Canadian studies; 0626: Sociology; 0740: Native American studies

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Child welfare Indigenous children Management of childhood Race and imperialism Settler colonialism Social work

Number of pages: 415

Publication year: 2017

Degree date: 2017

School code: 0779

Source: DAI-A 79/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-0-355-53232-6

Advisor: Razack, Sherene

Committee member: Bhuyan, Rupaleem; Cannon, Martin; Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera; Titchkosky, Tanya

University/institution: University of Toronto (Canada)

Department: Social Justice Education

University location: Canada

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 10634272

ProQuest document ID: 1999313367

Document URL: http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1999313367?accountid=14709

Copyright: Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.

Database: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Document 7 of 7

Up To Date and Progressive Winchester and Frederick County Virginia, 1870–1980

Author: Linhart, Mary Sullivan

Publication info: George Mason University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2014. 3671738.

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Abstract:

Between 1870 and 1980, leaders in Winchester and Frederick County, Virginia, successfully encouraged industry, diversified agriculture, improved local institutions and infrastructure, and promoted the community and its products. In 1870, the community was recovering from the devastation caused by the Civil War. In succeeding years, Winchester and Frederick County did not decline as the United States transitioned from an agricultural to an industrial economy. Unlike many other small American communities, Winchester and Frederick County achieved economic stability as farmers diversified crop production and business leaders organized to attract industry and encourage commerce and tourism. Leaders became community boosters and extended their goals to improve community life. Progressive leaders strengthened and expanded government, improved education and medical care, supported better transportation, and upgraded the civic infrastructure.

This dissertation examines progressive business leaders for more than a century and focuses on efforts to achieve economic stability. Farmers developed apples as an important commercial crop. In the business sector, leaders attracted outside industry and developed local industries to provide jobs. Leaders coped with many challenges, including the legacy of the Civil War, the impact of external forces, national economic downturns, the Great Depression, and two World Wars.

Most Winchester and Frederick County leaders between 1870 and 1980 were independent businessmen and believed there was a congruence of their interests and those of the region. They understood the community and were actively involved in civic life. Leaders influenced and reacted to the attitudes of fellow citizens. Leaders of Winchester and Frederick County were ordinary citizens who cooperated to expand and diversify the economy and meet the challenges of change.

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Subject: American history

Classification: 0337: American history

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences Business leaders Community Frederick County Progressive businesses Virginia Winchester Virginia

Number of pages: 370

Publication year: 2014

Degree date: 2014

School code: 0883

Source: DAI-A 76/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 978-1-321-48895-1

Advisor: Schrag, Zachary

Committee member: Petrik, Paula; Travis, Toni-Michelle

University/institution: George Mason University

Department: History

University location: United States — Virginia

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3671738

ProQuest document ID: 1651244442