Inviting proposals from prospective ‘special editors’ for the next issue of The British Journal for the History of Science Themes

Thanks.

———- Forwarded message ———
From: H-Net Notifications <drupaladmin@mail.h-net.org>
Date: Sat, Jun 13, 2020 at 1:12 AM
Subject: H-Sci-Med-Tech daily digest: 6 new items have been posted
To: jay@HSSONLINE.ORG <jay@hssonline.org>

Greetings Robert (Jay) Malone,

New items have been posted in H-Sci-Med-Tech.


Announcing the latest issue of Technology’s Stories: Aesthetics and Electricity

by Suzanne Moon
Aesthetics and Electricity
 The aestheticization of electrical technologies was not a secondary afterthought in the history of electrification, but a major factor in the very shaping of the modern electrified world. A sensitivity to aesthetics in design was a necessary consideration to manage collective hopes and fears about an electrified future. Design schemes for electrical technologies were mediated through class, status, gender, spatial, national or religious values and identities linked to modes of consumption. This issue highlights how electricity was historically melded into culturally agreeably forms.

Daniel Pérez Zapico: Aesthetics and the Political Appropriation of the Electric Light

Michael Kay: “A Mighty Cobweb”: Electricity, Aesthetics and the Urban Public Space

Karen Sayer: Light ‘Pollution’: The Aesthetics of Modernity Vs Pastoral in Britain

Technology’s Stories offers innovative, sharp, and compelling storytelling about technology in society, past and present. It aims to engage scholars, students, and the interested general public with the usable past – with stories that can help us make sense of contemporary technological challenges and aspirations. Pieces are strong on content and light on academic jargon, making them especially suitable for undergraduates.
Interested in putting together an issue for Technology’s Stories? Or publishing a standalone essay? Please contact us at techstories@techculture.org. We invite contributions from across the spectrum, from graduate students to senior scholars.
Sincerely,
Suzanne Moon, Editor, Technology’s Stories
Con Diaz, Associate Editor, Technology’s Stories
techstories@techculture.org

WEBINAR: Patents on Life: Diamond v. Chakrabarty at 40 (June 17, 1pm EDT)

by Eric Hintz

WEBINAR: Patents on Life: Diamond v. Chakrabarty at 40 (June 17, 1pm EDT)

 

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

1:00 – 2:30 PM (EDT)

This webinar is free and open to the public. No advance registration is required.

 

CLICK HERE TO JOIN THE LIVE WEBINAR: https://gmu.webex.com/gmu/onstage/g.php?MTID=edc57918cd80a86c10aa42962ce340089

 

In June 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Diamond v. Chakrabarty authorized the first patent on an intentionally genetically modified organism and concluded that patents may be granted for “anything under the sun that is made by man.” The decision contributed to the rise of the modern biotechnology industry and reshaped the agriculture industry. Less well known, the Plant Protection Act of 1930 had previously allowed intellectual property protection for selectively bred and cloned plants. On the 40th anniversary of Diamond v. Chakrabarty and the 90th anniversary of the Plant Protection Act, our expert panel will discuss breakthroughs in agricultural biotechnology and explore the impacts – economic and environmental – of these two major historical turning points. How did the rise of patented, GMO crops change farming? How did the Supreme Court’s decision change the patent system? How did developments in biotechnology reshape America’s innovation system?

 

We will take questions through the web portal following brief opening presentations and an initial discussion among the panelists.

 

PANELISTS:

  • Ananda M. Chakrabarty, inventor and distinguished professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Illinois Chicago College of Medicine
  • Dan Charles, science writer, National Public Radio food and agriculture correspondent
  • Daniel Kevles, Stanley Woodward Professor Emeritus of History, History of Medicine & American Studies, Yale University
  • Jennie Schmidt, farmer, registered dietitian nutritionist, and blogger at The Foodie Farmer
  • Moderator: Arthur Daemmrich, Director, Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History
  • Closing Remarks: Sean O’Connor, Executive Director & Senior Scholar, Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

Details: https://cpip.gmu.edu/patents-on-life-diamond-v-chakrabarty-at-40/

 

Real-time captioning (CART) for the live webinar will be provided. Please send an email to nmahprograms@si.edu with any other accessibility needs.

 

This webinar is co-presented by The Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, and the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School.

 

Inviting proposals from prospective ‘special editors’ for the next issue of The British Journal for the History of Science Themes

by Dominic Berry

Posted on behalf of Rohan Deb Roy-

 

Dear colleagues,

We are inviting proposals from prospective ‘special editors’ for the next issue of The British Journal for the History of Science Themes.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjhs-themes

BJHS Themes is a collaborative venture between the British Society for the History of Science and Cambridge University Press. It’s an open access journal. It is published annually. Each issue focusses on a particular theme in the histories of science (broadly defined).

Past issues can be found here https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjhs-themes/all-issues

Deadline for proposals from potential ‘special editors’: 15 July 2020. Further instructions for submitting proposals can be found here https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjhs-themes/information/information-for-proposals

We look forward to reading and learning from exciting proposals. Please get in touch (r.debroy@reading.ac.uk) if you have any questions.

Stay safe and best wishes,

Rohan Deb Roy

(Editor, BJHS Themes) 

Announcing the latest issue of Technology’s Stories: Aesthetics and Electricity

Aesthetics and Electricity

www.technologystories.org.

The aestheticization of electrical technologies was not a secondary afterthought in the history of electrification, but a major factor in the very shaping of the modern electrified world. A sensitivity to aesthetics in design was a necessary consideration to manage collective hopes and fears about an electrified future. Design schemes for electrical technologies were mediated through class, status, gender, spatial, national or religious values and identities linked to modes of consumption. This issue highlights how electricity was historically melded into culturally agreeably forms.

Daniel Pérez Zapico: Aesthetics and the Political Appropriation of the Electric Light

Michael Kay: “A Mighty Cobweb”: Electricity, Aesthetics and the Urban Public Space

Karen Sayer: Light ‘Pollution’: The Aesthetics of Modernity Vs Pastoral in Britain

Ying Jia Tan: Dreamscapes of Accelerated Development: Uses and Abuses of Artist Impressions in John L. Savage’s Yangtze Gorges Proposal, 1944-1946

Phil Judkins: Dreams and Visions: The Development of Military Radar Iconography and User Reaction, 1935-45

Abigail Harrison Moore: Electric Lighting: The Housewife’s Moral Challenge

Technology’s Stories offers innovative, sharp, and compelling storytelling about technology in society, past and present. It aims to engage scholars, students, and the interested general public with the usable past – with stories that can help us make sense of contemporary technological challenges and aspirations. Pieces are strong on content and light on academic jargon, making them especially suitable for undergraduates.

Interested in putting together an issue for Technology’s Stories? Or publishing a standalone essay? Please contact us at techstories@techculture.org. We invite contributions from across the spectrum, from graduate students to senior scholars.

2020 PSA Election Results

On behalf of the Governing Board of the Philosophy of Science Association, it is my pleasure to announce the results of the 2020 PSA Election. Thanks to all those who voted. We had an excellent turnout of 54.9%.

Michela Massimi of the University of Edinburgh has been elected President of the PSA. Michela Massimi will serve a two-year term (from 1/1/21 through 12/31/22) as Vice-President and President-Elect of the PSA, and then a two-year term (from 1/1/23 through 12/31/24) as President of the PSA delivering the PSA Presidential Address at PSA2024, followed by a two-year term as Past President of the PSA.

Anya Plutynski of Washington University in St. Louis (pictured below, left) and Jutta Schickore of Indiana University Bloomington (pictured below, right) were elected to the Governing Board of the PSA. Each will serve a four year term (1/1/2021-12/31/2024).

As of January 1, 2021, the Governing Board of the PSA will be comprised of:

Name

Term

Hanne Andersen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

1/1/19-12/31/22

Alisa Bokulich (Boston University)

1/1/18-12/31/21

Hasok Chang (University of Cambridge)

1/1/18-12/31/21

Soazig Le Bihan (University of Montana)

1/1/20-12/31/23

Kareem Khalifa (Middlebury College)

1/1/20-12/31/23

Anya Plutynski (Washington University in St. Louis)

1/1/21-12/31/24

Jutta Schickore (Indiana University Bloomington)

1/1/21-12/31/24

Sean A. Valles (Michigan State University)

1/1/19-12/31/22

The officers of the PSA welcome and congratulate Professors Massimi, Plutynski, and Schickore on their election to the PSA Governing Board, and offer their gratitude to all the candidates who ran for election. The officers also express their appreciation to Sandra D. Mitchell (University of Pittsburgh), Past President of the PSA, Megan Delehanty (University of Calgary) and Edouard Machery (University of Pittsburgh), who will be stepping down from the Governing Board at the end of the year, for their dedicated service to the PSA.

The Officers of the PSA also thank the Nominating Committee, comprised of Sabina Leonelli as Chair (University of Exeter), Alan Love (University of Minnesota), and Kerry McKenzie (University of California, San Diego) for assembling a great ballot.

The 2020 PSA Election was conducted electronically using www.simplyvoting.com. PSA members were solicited to vote via email. Of 521 voters eligible to vote in the 2020 PSA election, 286 (54.9%) cast votes. Turnout in 2020 increased 2.5% as compared to 2019.

Finally, I thank those Full and Retired PSA members who took the time to vote in this election. Thank you for helping to shape the future of the PSA. This is your PSA. If you are a Full or Retired Member of the PSA and you encountered problems in voting electronically, or if you have any other comments, questions, or concerns about the 2020 PSA Election, please contact me at psa@umbc.edu.

Sincerely,

Jessica Pfeifer
Executive Director
Philosophy of Science Association

New director takes helm at National Science Foundation

Sethuraman Panchanathan commits to continued inclusiveness, advancement of fundamental research

Following in the footsteps of many great science and engineering leaders before him, Sethuraman Panchanathan has been officially appointed and begins work today as the National Science Foundation’s 15th director, sharing his vision for his six-year term and promising a continued push for inclusiveness in science and engineering.

“Right now, the world faces significant scientific challenges — most obviously a pandemic.” Panchanathan said. “But in addition to providing creative solutions to address current problems, our eyes are on the future, leveraging partnerships at every level and encouraging diversity that breeds new ideas for a robust pipeline of young scientists. It is only through that expansive perspective on the scientific and engineering enterprise that we can recognize the brightest ideas and nurture them into tomorrow’s world-class technological innovations.”

Panchanathan identified three pillars of his vision for NSF: advancing research into the future, ensuring inclusivity and continuing global leadership in science and engineering. He has a long history of doing exactly those things. His current position, which he has held for the past nine years at Arizona State University, has allowed him to lead the Knowledge Enterprise, which has advanced research, innovation, strategic partnerships, entrepreneurship and global and economic development.

“World-class science requires talented scientists and engineers drawn from every corner of our nation — from remote rural areas to the largest urban centers. The best science is shaped by a wide range of perspectives,” Panchanathan said. “I want people to get excited by science and have the opportunity to be part of the scientific enterprise. It is our responsibility to inspire talent and find ways to catalyze innovation across our country. NSF has a proven record in this area; the INCLUDES program and its emphasis on broadening participation is an example of NSF’s forward thinking.”

Panchanathan noted that it is NSF’s mission of funding basic research that has yielded groundbreaking discoveries over the years. “Seeding basic research across all fields of science and engineering is NSF’s core mission. NSF seeds discovery. NSF seeds the economy. NSF seeds the future,” he said. “Advancing basic research is our fundamental purpose and looking to cutting-edge areas such as artificial intelligence, quantum computing, and big data will accelerate our science and technology progress in the coming years. I am excited by the National Science Board’s (NSB) Vision 2030 strategic plan which is an excellent framework for advancing science and technology.”

Panchanathan began his career at Arizona State and founded the Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CUbiC), a group that designed technologies and devices to assist people with disabilities. He also founded and led the School of Computing and Informatics and the Department of Biomedical Informatics and was subsequently appointed as Arizona State’s Chief of Research and Innovation in 2009. During his tenure, ASU was named the Most Innovative University by the U.S. News and World Report five years in a row, and its research volume quintupled. He has also been serving as a member of the NSB since 2014. NSB establishes NSF policy and advises both the agency and the U.S. president.

Panchanathan is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. He is also a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Society of Optical Engineering. He served as a chair in the Council on Research within the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. Panchanathan was the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Multimedia Magazine and also served as an editor or associate editor for many other journals.

Since NSF’s previous director France Córdova finished her term, Kelvin Droegemeier has doubled as President Trump’s science adviser and acting NSF director.

“A big part of why the National Science Foundation has such a rich history of leading the way in science and engineering has to do with the people who work there,” Droegemeier said. “Dr. Panchanathan has the creativity, tenacity, and commitment to lead this agency successfully and continue moving the scientific enterprise forward on the endless frontier. I’m excited to see him make his mark and take the agency to the next level.”

President Trump announced Panchanathan’s nomination to serve as NSF’s 15th director on December 18, 2019. The Senate confirmed Panchanathan on June 18, 2020. Droegemeier will swear him in at a ceremony that will take place on July 2, 2020.

Pandemic, Creating a Usable Past: Epidemic History, COVID-19, and the Future of Health

Pandemic, Creating a Usable Past: Epidemic History, COVID-19, and the Future of Health

See the full program description here

Further reading and resources

In the face of COVID-19, historians of public health, nursing, and medicine come together to reflect on past epidemics and their implications for how we confront today’s unfolding crisis.

Those who study epidemics and pandemics in the past see powerful echoes in the present crisis. In the past as today, families and societies grappled with the sudden tragic loss of life. They debated the social and economic fallout from the epidemic. They struggled with tensions over the halting of commerce, the imposition of quarantines, and social distancing measures. They fought over the impact of public health measures on personal freedom and civil liberties. They tried to make sense of the different impact of disease across regions and populations, well-off and poor. They sought cures and prevention measures, even as dubious theories and fraudulent practices sprung up.  They argued over what forms of knowledge or faith would guide them through the calamity. They called for reinventing public health during the crisis, and for rethinking social priorities once the epidemic subsided. And, even as the toll of death widened, they planned for the uncertain future.

With history as our guide, this forum of epidemic experts explores how people and societies in former eras responded to pandemic challenges. What perspective does their experience offer for the present? What guidance does the past provide for the future of public health, health care, and public policy?

Sponsored by the American Association for the History of Medicine with support from Princeton University, Department of History

The Global Phenomenon of Phrenology A Conversation with James Poskett

In this podcast episode, we talk with James Poskett, author of Materials of the Mind: Phrenology, Race, and the Global History of Science, 1815-1920.

Phrenology was the most popular mental science of the Victorian age. From American senators to Indian social reformers, this new mental science found supporters around the globe. Materials of the Mind tells the story of how phrenology changed the world—and how the world changed phrenology.

This is a story of skulls from the Arctic, plaster casts from Haiti, books from Bengal, and letters from the Pacific. Drawing on far-flung museum and archival collections, and addressing sources in six different languages, Materials of the Mind is an impressively innovative account of science in the nineteenth century as part of global history. It shows how the circulation of material culture underpinned the emergence of a new materialist philosophy of the mind, while also demonstrating how a global approach to history can help us reassess issues such as race, technology, and politics today.

James Poskett is Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at the University of Warwick.

Materials of the Mind: Phrenology, Race, and the Global History of Science, 1815-1920 (University of Chicago Press, 2019)

Dissertation Abstracts 79-04 A and B

JHMDiss97-04-4444-

ISISDiss97-04-4444-ONLY

These are the latest batch of recent doctoral dissertations harvested from the issues 79-04 A and B of Dissertation Abstracts related to your subject area of the history of science and medicine.  Now that I have retired I have limited my dissertation harvesting to the last several years’ coverage-still plenty of items that may interest to you. These two issues for some reason had many more titles than normal.

You will find a number of duplicate citations-the ProQuest database is including over 30% duplicate titles, sometimes in multiple months.  I try and catch these duplicates but I am sure you will find that I missed quite a few.

I hope that some of the materials I am providing you will be of use to your journal/website/blog.  Feel free to share this material with your colleagues.

I expect to begin harvesting issues 79-05 A and B by the end of next week so I hope to send you this latest dissertation list by the beginning of July, 2020.

Jonathon Erlen
University of Pittsburgh-Retired
johnerlen@gmail.com

Call for Book Chapters: “Modern Theory and Metatheory of Defense Technology and Science”

Basil Evangelidis
Vernon Press

Vernon Press invites book chapter proposals on the thematic of Modern European and Atlantic Theory and Metatheory of Defense Technology and Science. The Pursuit of Power as an interaction between society, technology and armed forces, as the historian McNeill defined it, is the starting point of this problematic. This edited book, however, should try to supervene and unify the dispersed historical perspectives, by questioning its background methodological presuppositions and discussing the following theoretical directions: International and Strategic Studies, Modern Weapons Technology, Psychological Operations and Crisis Management, Mass Communication and Propaganda, Policy and Law Enforcement, Fortifications and Automation Technology, Air Force and UAV, Situational Awareness, Radar and Lidar, Innovation, Invention and Discovery, Centers, Peripheries and Technical Progress, Space Science, Technical Expertise and Training, Nutrition, Medicine, Transports and Engineering.

Relevant to the above mentioned theoretical research interests are also the metatheoretical topics of Innovation Projects in Scientific Reasoning, ranging from Quantum Logic to Space Exploration. A philosopher of modern science investigates many different types and modules of Innovative Reasoning, which has proved to be essential for planning Defense Technology Projects: Theory of Truth and Evidence, Logic of Relations and Semiotics, Modal Realism and Mathematical Philosophy, Ethics and Decision Making, Criteriology, Quantitative and Qualitative Methods of Research, Quantum Logic, Grades of Equations, Computational Networks, Non-Commutative Mathematics, Topology, Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Science, Neurobiology, Astrophysics and Cosmology. Such metatheoretical research hallmarks are indispensable for philosophical research on Defense Problems in present times and for the future scientific community.

The time scope of the chapters of the proposed edited book should focus on historical evidence from American Independence until the present, such as the bureaucratization of violence, the frontier expansion, the military impact of the industrial revolution, the industrialization of war, the emergence of the Military-Industrial Complex in Great Britain, the World Wars, the balance of power, the arms race etc. The aforementioned points of interest need deeper investigation, because they play a significant role in contemporary defense science, in the quest for realistic, anthropological, structural or many worlds interpretations of technological innovation, furthermore, in inductive and deductive logic, theory and metatheory of policy making in international levels. The dynamic linkages and the interdependency between induction and deduction, theory and metatheory is one of the most important research problems for the Philosophy of Physical and Human Sciences of Defense.

Please email proposals for chapters to Dr. Basil Evangelidis, by August 1, 2020.

Polio Across the Iron Curtain: A Conversation with Dora Vargha

In this podcast episode, we discuss the history of vaccines and public health with Dora Vargha, author of Polio Across the Iron Curtain: Hungary’s Cold War with an Epidemic.

By the end of the 1950s, Hungary became an unlikely leader in what we now call global health. Only three years after Soviet tanks crushed the revolution of 1956, Hungary became one of the first countries to introduce the Sabin vaccine into its national vaccination program. This immunization campaign was built on years of scientific collaboration between East and West, in which scientists, specimens, vaccines and iron lungs crossed over the Iron Curtain. Dóra Vargha uses a series of polio epidemics in communist Hungary to understand the response to a global public health emergency in the midst of the Cold War. She argues that despite the antagonistic international atmosphere of the 1950s, spaces of transnational cooperation between blocs emerged to tackle a common health crisis. At the same time, she shows that epidemic concepts and policies were influenced by the very Cold War rhetoric that medical and political cooperation transcended. This title is also available as Open Access.

Listen to the podcast, explore additional resources on this topic, and add your own questions or comments in the discussion forum.

Dora Vargha is a Senior Lecturer in Medical Humanities at the University of Exeter. She is the author of Polio Across the Iron Curtain: Hungary’s Cold War with an Epidemic.