July 2017 – Member News

Warwick Anderson (University of Sydney) has been appointed to the Gough Whitlam and Malcom Fraser chair in Australian Studies at Harvard University for 2018-19, to be held in the Department of the History of Science.

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Theodore Arabatzis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens) received the 2017 IUHPST Essay Prize in History and Philosophy of Science for his paper “What’s in it for the historian of science? Reflections on the value of philosophy of science for history of science”. View the announcement of the prize here. The paper will appear in International Studies in the Philosophy of Science.

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Carin Berkowitz (Chemical Heritage Foundation) served as co-editor (with Bernie Lightman) for the recently published Science Museums in Transition: Cultures of Display in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America (University of Pittsburgh Press).

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Laura Bland, who received her PhD at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed Visiting Assistant Professor of History and Liberal Studies in the Honors College at the University of Houston in Houston, Texas. Laura worked in the HSS Executive Office during her time at Notre Dame, and we are pleased with her appointment.

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Jimena Canales, the Thomas M. Siebel Chair in the History of Science and professor of history at the University of Illinois, has been elected a member of the board of directors of the American Council of Learned Societies for a 4-year term. The ACLS board establishes overall direction and policy, allocates funds, oversees investments, and reports on all major decisions to the constituent societies. The HSS has been a constituent society of ACLS since 1927.

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Bruce HuntBruce Hunt (University of Texas, Austin) will deliver the 2018 George Sarton Memorial Lecture in the History and Philosophy of Science at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The meeting is scheduled for 15-18 February.

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Gwen Kay (SUNY Oswego) has been elected SUNY University Faculty Senate president, a two-year position to represent all faculty and staff in matters of shared governance on the system and campus levels.

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Melanie A. Kiechle’s (Virginia Tech) first book, Smell Detectives: An Olfactory History of Nineteenth-Century Urban America, has been published as part of the Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books series with the University of Washington Press.

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Mimi Kim has released a new book: Mi Gyung Kim, The Imagined Empire: Balloon Enlightenments in Revolutionary Europe (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016). An electronic version of the book is now available.

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Roy MacLeod has been chosen by the Royal Society of New South Wales to receive the
Society’s History and Philosophy of Science Medal for 2016. The presentation was scheduled to be made by the Governor of New South Wales in Sydney on May 3, 2017. The honor was awarded for Roy’s “significant contributions to the history and philosophy of science” in Australia and around the World, including his pioneering scholarship in the history of Australian colonial science and for the biography of Archibald Liversidge, FRS, entitled Imperial Science under the Sun (Sydney University Press, 2009).

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Ronald E. Mickens and Charmayne Patterson have published “Systems Exhibiting Alternative Futures” in the Georgia Journal of Science, Vol. 75, Article 4 (2017).

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Mary Mitchell, an indefatigable volunteer for the HSS whose work focuses on the intersections of nuclear science and technology with environmental law and social movements, will join the Purdue University faculty as an assistant professor in August (congratulations Mary!).

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Gregg Mitman (University of Wisconsin, Madison) is one of 35 scholars selected for an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. The fellowships recognize an exceptional group of both established and emerging scholars, journalists, and authors with the goal of strengthening U.S. democracy, driving technological and cultural creativity, exploring global connections and global ruptures, and improving both natural and human environments. View the announcement here.

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Ainissa Ramirez, a new member of the society, received the Norm Augustine Award for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Communications from the American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES). Past recipients of the award include: Neil Armstrong, Henry Petroski, and David Sadoway. You can find out more about Ainissa’s work at http://www.aaes. org/awards .

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Alain Touwaide’s recent interview with Routledge Press can be found here. In it he discusses his recent publication A Census of Greek Medical Manuscripts: From Byzantium to the Renaissance.

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Tania Munz Moving to the National Humanities Center

The National Humanities Center (NHC), located in Durham, North Carolina in the U.S., has appointed Tania Munz as Vice President for Scholarly Programs, effective 1 August 2017.

Dr. Munz comes to the Center having most recently served as Vice President for Research & Scholarship at the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, MO, where she oversaw the library’s fellowship program and managed its collection of over half a million monograph volumes and more than 48,000 journal titles. She has previously held research and teaching positions at Northwestern University and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. She holds a BA in the history of science and medicine from the University of Chicago, an MA in the history of science and technology from the University of Minnesota, and received her PhD in history from Princeton University. Prior to pursuing her graduate education, Munz taught biology and chemistry in Berne, Switzerland, and worked as a museum educator and exhibit developer at the Bakken Library and Museum in Minneapolis. She also served as a guest producer on National Public Radio’s popular Talk of the Nation “Science Friday” segment.

Munz’s scholarship has focused on the history of animal behavior studies, especially the work of Nobel laureate Karl von Frisch. Her book, The Dancing Bees: Karl von Frisch and the Discovery of the Honeybee Language, was published in 2016 by the University of Chicago Press. Munz is also a member of the History of Science Society where she served as a member of the society’s council and strategic planning committee.

Robert D. Newman, President and Director of the National Humanities Center, noted Munz’s experiences as a dedicated scholar and administrator as well as her experience as a public advocate as qualities that distinguished her to the selection committee.

“Tania has a wonderful appreciation not only for how research is conducted and supported, but for how it must be championed,” he said. “Her scholarly and administrative experience make her an ideal choice to sustain and broaden the Center’s status as the premiere destination in which to incubate and accomplish advanced research in the humanities.”

“I am delighted for the opportunity to oversee the Center’s scholarly programs,” said Munz. “Over the past forty years, the Center has established itself as an ideal place for pursuing humanities research, and I look forward to helping ensure that reputation continues for years to come.”

Sara Schechner Receives American Astronomical Society Prize

Dr. Sara Schechner, History of Science Department and Collection of Historical Science Instruments at Harvard University has been awarded the highly prestigious LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy from the Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS). The Doggett Prize is awarded biennially to an individual who has significantly influenced the field through a career-long effort. This award recognizes both her scholastic achievements and her service to HAD and to the study of astronomical history worldwide. Sara is the first woman to receive the award.

The announcement reads: The HAD Prize Committee is pleased to announce that Dr. Sara J. Schechner will be the recipient of the 2018 award. Sara is a prominent member of the Historical Astronomy Division. She served as Vice Chair, Chair, and Past Chair during the period 2005-2011, and has served on numerous HAD committees. During 1990s she was an especially valuable member of the AAS Centennial Committee, and served as Chair of the Exhibit Subcommittee. She has also served on the Working Group on the Preservation of Astronomical Heritage since 2007.

Her influence upon the history of astronomy is felt worldwide. She received her PhD (supervised by Owen Gingerich and I. Bernard Cohen) in 1988, and since 2000 has been the David P. Wheatland Curator of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard. There she acts as chief curator for early scientific instruments and related books and photographs. She is widely published; her two most recent volumes are Sundials and Time: Finding Instruments of the Adler Planetarium (Adler Planetarium, 2017) and Tangible Things: Making History through Objects (Oxford University Press, 2015; co-authored with Laurel Ulrich, Ivan Gaskell, and Sarah Carter). She has prepared numerous exhibitions and received many awards, including the Great Exhibitions Prize from the British Society for the History of Science in 2014 and the Joseph H. Hazen Education Prize from the History of Science Society in 2008.

The award will be presented at a plenary session of the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society, to be held next January in National Harbor, Maryland.

Londa Schiebinger Recognized by the American Medical Women’s Association as the Presidential Recognition Award Recipient

The American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) honored Dr. Londa Schiebinger with the 2017 Presidential Recognition Award at its 102nd annual meeting award luncheon on April 1, 2017. This award is given by the AMWA President for excellence in science, medicine, clinical practice, leadership, humanitarianism, or philanthropy. Dr. Schiebinger was recognized for her inspiring work to raise awareness of the broad expanse of sex and gender differences and for launching the Gendered Innovations program at Stanford University.

Londa Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University. She currently directs the Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment project. She is a leading international expert on gender in science, and has addressed the United Nations on the topic of “Gender, Science, and Technology.” She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work on Gendered Innovations (genderedinnovations.stanford.edu) harnesses the creative power of sex and gender analysis to enhance excellence and reproducibility in science and medicine. Her prize-winning books include: The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science; Nature’s Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science; Has Feminism Changed Science?; Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World; with Robert N. Proctor, Agnotology: The Making and Unmaking of Ignorance; and with Andrea Davies Henderson and Shannon Gilmartin, Dual Career Couples: What Universities Need to Know.