June 2015 Issue of Isis Is Now Online

IsisThe latest issues of Isis is available by clicking here. In this issue, editor H. Floris Cohen on his vision for the journal; “The Prehistory of Serendipity, from Bacon to Walpole,” by Sean Silver; “Building Networks for Science: Conflict and Cooperation in Nineteenth-Century Global Marine Studies,” by Azadeh Achbari; “A Drifting Concept for an Unruly Menace: A History of Psychopathy in Germany,” by Greg Eghigian; “The Invisible and Indeterminable Value of Ecology: From Malaria Control to Ecological Research in the American South,” by Albert G. Way. This issue also features a free access section titled “The History of Humanities and the History of Science” edited by Rens Bod and Julia Kursell, with articles by Jeroen Bouterse and Bart Karstens, Julia Kursell, Rens Bod, and Lorraine Daston and Glenn W. Most. It also contains news of the profession, two essay reviews, and many book reviews.

Statement on Academic Freedom in Wisconsin

The American Historical Association and other scholarly associations recently issued a statement on academic freedom in Wisconsin. The HSS officers endorse this statement but the Society could not sign it due to the impossibility of gaining Council agreement in the short time span allowed.

The letter states that a “wide variety of disciplines are gravely concerned with proposals pending in the Wisconsin legislature that threaten to undermine several longstanding features of the state’s current higher education system: shared governance, tenure, and academic freedom.” Click here to read the whole letter on the AHA website.

April Newsletter Now Available

The April 2015 issue of the HSS Newsletter is now available and can be viewed here. A pdf of the full issue can be viewed here.
In this issue: HSS President Angela Creager reports on the activities of the Society in 2014; Executive Director Jay Malone describes his advocacy work in Washington D.C.; Editor H. Floris Cohen describes the new editorial management system for Isis; a festschrift for Mary Jo Nye; Richard Oosterhoff discusses the role of genius in K-12 science education, Xaq Frohlich reflects on the role of humanities in an era of transformative science and technology; Steven Wheatley discusses the potential impact of open access on learned societies; the 2016 3-Societies Meeting in Canada are announced, as well as member news, news from the profession, and other items.

The IsisCB Offers a Data Hacking Competition

If you had access to all of the data in the Isis Current Bibliography (IsisCB) for the last forty years, what could you do with it? If want to get your hands dirty for a day and play around with the IsisCB data, see what’s there, and what you can make it do for you, consider signing up for Hack-the-CB 2015!

Click here for more details!

HSS Signs Letter Regarding Georgia RFRA

The History of Science Society joined six sister societies, including the American Historical Association and the Philosophy of Science Association, in sending a letter to the Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau protesting the potential passage of a “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” in the state of Georgia. All of these organizations are planning on holding meetings in Atlanta in the near future, and the letter states that this legislation might precipitate moving the meetings to other cities where similar laws have not been passed. You can read the entire text of the letter by clicking here.

Social Science Funding Factsheets

The Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA), of which HSS is a member, has released state-by-state factsheets detailing the amount of federalCOSSA logo social and behavioral science funding available across the United States and the major institutional recipients.

Click here to find your state.

History of Science Society Strategic Plan – 2014

Early in 2013, the History of Science Society Executive Committee made a commitment to launch a structured strategic planning initiative to take on the tasks of reviewing the organization’s mission; agreeing on a vision; identifying and coping with changing circumstances; providing a framework of deliberate priorities to guide day-to-day decision-making and allocation of human and financial resources; evaluating performance and organizational effectiveness; and making a sound case for philanthropic support.

The 2013 annual meeting in Boston marked the first formal meeting for strategic planning. Much behind-the-scenes activity led to a planning retreat in Chicago, where 40 members of the HSS, from around the world, gathered to debate and discuss whom the HSS serves and, essentially, our raison d’être. The retreat members identified 6 goals that they considered paramount.

To view these goals, their objectives, action steps, and evaluation procedures, as well as the rest of the strategic plan, click here.

Isis Books Received Updated

The list of books received in the editorial offices of Isis through March 2015 can be found at the Isis Books Received page here. Any books purchased through links on the Books Received page will help support the History of Science Society.

HSS Awarded NSF Grant for Conference Travel

The History of Science Society has won a grant of over $200K from the National Science Foundation for a project titled “Eight Societies Travel Grants for Graduate Students, Independent Scholars, and Recent PhDs” (SES-1354351). The award will provide travel assistance to graduate students, independent scholars, and those who have recently received PhDs who wish to attend the professional meetings of the following eight societies:

•     the History of Science Society (HSS)
•     the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT)
•     the Philosophy of Science Association (PSA)
•     the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS)
•     the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH)
•     the International Society for the Psychology of Science and Technology (ISPST)
•     the International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology (ISH)
•     and the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts (SLSA).

Elizabeth Paris Endowment for Socially Engaged History and Philosophy of Science

The Elizabeth Paris Endowment for Socially Engaged History and Philosophy of Science honors the life and interests of Elizabeth Paris (1968-2009), a historian and philosopher of science and HSS member. The Endowment aims to provide for a regular public event that will bring to a wider audience an understanding of the value of the history and philosophy of science. The first event was a Baskes Lecture in History, presented by Peter Galison at the Chicago Humanities festival titled “From Einstein’s Clocks to the Refusal of Time.”

For more information on Elizabeth, the Endowment, and how to give, please click this link.